For 393 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diane Werts' Scores

Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Detour: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 58 out of 393
393 tv reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    Tonight's preview/pilot can get so intoxicated with hip-hop scratching - jump-cuts, slo-mo, video backtracking - that it forgets to remember style best serves substance. [14 Apr 2003]
    • Newsday
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    Quinn radiates enough sincerity to make us keep reading this uneven book, just to see how it shapes up.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    While we've got to be grateful that last season's tone-deaf Applewhite saga has seen its end, this year's "DH" still is sounding the occasional flat note, sometimes by repeating its past and other times by ignoring it altogether. [22 Sep 2006]
    • Newsday
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    The wit can get a little heavyhanded sometimes - yes, it's another series with voiceover narration (can anybody say "Sex and the City"?) - but its heart, and head, are in the right place.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    Murphy's concept in its basics is already beautiful. But he pushes the show to be a breathtaking knockout. Like some plastic surgery patients, Nip/Tuck initially gets such a pleasing result that it doesn't seem to know when to stop.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    [The episodes are] smarter than you might expect but not quite as clever as they work at being. Like the family unit it portrays, this dark/lighthearted drama tries to have everything at once and struggles under the far-reaching effort.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    If only the delicacy of these two character actors [Alfred Molina and Michael Keaton], were matched by that of The Company's central figures and the production's overall arc.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    We haven't had a good dishy time-waster in awhile. Maybe this is it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    "Flight of the Conchords" isn't brilliant, but it isn't awful, either, just familiar, with two likable stars who seem to be channeling the deadpan dry wit of an old Beatles movie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    This Fox series is smartly written and acted, and it's even evocatively filmed in New York locations that lend it a gritty city flavor. But.... Less persuasively entwined is a heavy-handed romance whodunit.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Diane Werts
    This isn't "Friends," after all. At its hour length, "Related" asks us to take the Sorelli saga somewhat more seriously. Yet it provides sitcom incidents that can't stand the significance test.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Colorfully drawn. But all inside the lines.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Its rambling storytelling starts to reveal distinct shape in these people, their relationships and the show's quirky comic perspective [in the second episode].
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    If only it were more interesting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Its hasty pace frequently muddles precisely who's who where, when or why. Even the zippy sex scenes play like another gratuitous burst of firepower.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    The first two episodes prove as tiresomely pleased-with-themselves as my run-on sentences. A half-hour is too much of not enough.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Sure, Thursday's pilot is junk, but it's pretty, diligent junk, essentially The Whopper of action TV, heaped high with mayhem condiments.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    There's little here that hasn't been dramatized to death already.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    So pleased with itself, it doesn't seem concerned about pleasing us.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Consider Seed the cutoffs and flip-flops of the comedy dress code. Acceptable in summer. But just barely.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    While The Neighbors sketches something genuinely creative--and truly weird--its comedy doesn't really come together.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Roseanne's Nuts isn't awful. It just is. There's "nut" much happening.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    About a Boy yearns to be good. Yet it relishes being bad. And Katims--guiding hand to "Parenthood" and "Friday Night Lights"--doesn't fess up to that dichotomy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    de Cadenet's interesting. Her talk show is much less so.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    The target viewer wouldn't watch all this predictable--I mean, impulsive--bickering and button-pushing while thinking: I wonder why all the paintings and posters on the walls in the background are blurred out? And then think: Geez, why am I even wondering about that? The audience for Joan Knows Best? will be loving Joan's visits to three plastic surgeons Tuesday, not fretting.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Maybe the Thursday pilot's portentous whispers in candle-lighted spaces will seem less pretentious and more profound as Dominion moves past initial exposition from a cast trying not to sound like they're from all over the planet.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Diane Werts
    Families can watch this together nightly. The pace isn't exactly taxing. And it's summer.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    This hour is focused as much on standup craft as sitcom-building, and fails to put the comics' genre-expanding series concepts into the context of their times.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    With "Satisfaction" an hour later proving even USA now knows what adult TV can really be, Rush doesn't deliver one.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Greetings From Tucson tries the high-wire act of both avoiding and exploiting Mexican-American stereotypes, and falls flat on its back in the desert sand next to the tire swing and the El Camino. [20 Sept 2002]
    • Newsday
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Lynch can be as goofy-delightful here as in the ensembles of “Party Down” and “Glee.” But she’s all over everything, all the time, in a show that just won’t let up.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    TV fave Daly is more personally accessible than Janssen and Harrison Ford. And his show is beautifully produced. But we've seen it all before. CBS must figure this old-style genre-single- lead hero, chase drama, closed-end action-is primed for a comeback, though it's hard to imagine younger viewers sitting still for this Diagnosis Pursuit. [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • Newsday
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    "Drive" is less the sort of textured character study we've come to expect than an action-packed joy ride. That's not to say you won't wanna hop in. But it's hardly a journey you've gotta take.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    With all this time spent checking off genre boxes, there’s scant space for the narrative to breathe beyond them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Nothing is left unspoken in dialogue as blandly obvious as "I am the only other person who knows" and "She had a lot of secrets."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    To steal from the old beer slogan, (this show) looks great, (but it's) less filling (than it intends).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Bull is sleek in look, pace and technique--and crafty enough to indulge CBS’ trademark dollop of human feeling amid the flash. But it’s essentially breezy TV junk food, leaving behind a prefab aftertaste.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Not that I think The CW has any grasp of the mental mojo that made its WB network predecessor such a pop-culture kick. Really? This twaddle? Every single week?
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Despite Salomon's efforts at visually stylish filmmaking, Justice for Natalee Holloway never puts any real meat on the bones of the much-hyped saga.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    While it's nice to see a show that isn't cops/docs/lawyers, it'd be nicer if the show was better.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    ABC's new computer animated Shrek half-hour seems to disqualify itself from the timeless category almost immediately by insisting on being "hip" (which means anti-hip), usually at the expense of feeling real.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Surface fashion styling can't cloak the underlying framework of yet another CBS procedural.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    If only I were 12 again. The tween in me would have loved the scruff and the cute and the “wild” antics.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Their [Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon's] Odd Couple feels like the kind of time-filling time killer that's chasing viewers to other options.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    At first glance in the two-hour pilot, none of the actors comes close to the robust presence of "SG-1" star Richard Dean Anderson, while the show relies on the technology and special effects that can send noncultists fleeing. (Good luck trying to fathom the setup, too, if you're not already "Stargate"-versed.) [11 Jul 2004]
    • Newsday
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    If only the series works its way toward more effective show than tell, Las Vegas might find itself with a winning hand.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    The episodes’ hectic “action” often lands perfunctory or incongruous, and character development languishes in favor of sex scenes and left-field encounters “to be explained later.”
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    So the show seems either a subversive deconstruction of the laugh-track sitcom blueprint or a stupefying misfire built around the blandest star ever.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    I did catch enough of "Hart of Dixie" to tell it's formula absurdity for the "princess" demographic of magical thinkers who now imagine being lifesaving doctors as well as rescued royals.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Pathos may make for a more positive reality TV experience than a parade of lying, backstabbing and physical torture. But the basic appeal remains pathetic. Perhaps in more ways than one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    "The Tudors" could actually use a touch of the over-the-top wildness that undermined the substance of HBO's "Rome." If we could blend the two together somehow, we might have a kickily effective history mash-up.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Lehman is good, most everything's OK, but nothing is especially fresh or compelling.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Though American tastes are mocked here, too, laughing at your own group doesn't necessarily excuse laughing at others.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Stamos' half-hour goes on to indulge such other TV trends as black lesbian confidantes, "BuzzFeed listicle" Web checks and the single camera's incessant progression of "witty" repartee jumping to quick-cut "gags" jumping to "awww" sentiment.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    The stories may hardly be innovative... but their very familiarity becomes comforting.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    This show lurches along, all its sitcom puzzle pieces laid out without being assembled into even a Hollywood picture of life.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    Most of Luis so far is underdeveloped and oversold. [19 Sept 2003, p.B48]
    • Newsday
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Diane Werts
    We've seen this show before, in fresher settings, with stronger comic structure --from, in fact, the same creators: Merchant and American "Office" writers Lee Eisenberg and Gene Stupnitsky.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    Conviction is so into overkill, it’s hard to tell what to take seriously.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    Bob's Burgers might be meatier if it gave us some reason to watch these characters. The title isn't the only thing that feels generic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    Married, in particular, is one-note with character tone: clueless people acting heedlessly.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    There's no "here" here.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    There's no authentic life to Saint George beyond the setup/joke/laugh formula and its witless, gamy punchlines.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    There might be something smartly contemporary buried deep inside Manhattan Love Story, but the pilot is too busy demonstrating its cognizance of connected devices and social media.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    The pilot's accumulation of cute - oh, for the straightforward simplicity of bowling alley lawyer "Ed" - feels overbearing long before Kelley's courtroom summation turns societal sermon.
    • Newsday
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    Crawford and Wayans display little rapport. That leaves racing cars, speeding bullets and wannabe wit to prop up an essentially superfluous show.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    There's cheese (i.e., all Syfy flicks) and then there's cheese--Velveeta vs. Brie. But guess what? Ghost Shark is both! How victims die, which body parts are left and where, the perfectly predictable dialogue and straight-faced performances, even a historical nod to Roanoke--we're just not worthy of this much smartly executed satisfaction.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 42 Diane Werts
    These guys are so bland and their together time so contrived, it's more fun to watch the gears turn on the tired docusoap machine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    The first hour manages to feel both mechanical and manipulative, without feeling truly exciting or even grounded anyplace.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    Whoa, pardner. Calm down. There's too much struttin' and puffin' in the pilot for our taste. Rich casting and drama possibilities get mired in improbable events. And the basic premise -white father rides in to save black city? -is asking for trouble. [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • Newsday
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    Yikes, this is calculating. Ouch, is it way too self-aware (even for teens). There's a caste system in high school? Are you shocked to learn this? [29 Sept 1999, p.B03]
    • Newsday
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    The women's friendship radiates authentic undertones, beneath all the gooed-up personal drivel, although it's way too convenient how they always show up simultaneously at the same crime scenes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    The pilot serves up flashy ooh-ah instead of anything tangible to wrap our arms around.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    There's greatness begging to be grasped here, and nobody has a handle on it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    An energetic attempt ... What there isn't, unfortunately, is enough character development to make you care about anybody or anything. [1 Jan 1998]
    • Newsday
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    There's nothing to relate to here, just to observe from afar, and only Tambor's as-always deft comic distraction gives us anything worth glancing at.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    There's just too much shtick and not enough personality, especially when the stars' previous hits found their funny in relatable human behavior.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    So much of tonight's series pilot feels so glib and rings so false, it's hard to believe this soapy saga comes from the quality-not-quantity production team of Tom Fontana and Julie Martin.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    Alex O'Loughlin is bogged down by trite dialogue, half-hearted support, perfunctory exposition, and better-to-look-good-than-make-sense production priorities.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    Tonight's "Skating" debut glides onto the air in a weird sort of middle zone, not quite cheesy enough to skewer, yet too much a cheese-product to take seriously.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Diane Werts
    This canned stew is further flavored with too-snappy comebacks, too-slick repartee and too-clever contrivances. Making it bearable are cast members who do somehow manage to seem like people next door.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 33 Diane Werts
    Narration clunkily tries to fill the narrative void. But it's blandly delivered.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Someone must believe the allure of "CSI" lies in its "look" - Cold Case also offers time-tripping flashbacks blending the past incident into present time - along with the behavioral "cool" of its central character. But even when William Petersen plays reserved, his "CSI" cop seems to be seething at his core. That suppressed fire makes him worth watching. Morris is barely an ember.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Where "Batman" played it straight, and was therefore kinky, Scorpion smugly thinks it's cute, and therefore isn't. Its cops are Keystone, its star is personality-free and its plot progressions are dippy-dumb. But Lintel's poppin' chest is always well-lit, gunfire is frequent and spectacular explosions keep topping themselves. [4 Jan 2001, p.B31]
    • Newsday
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Eli Stone is fated to flounder.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    There's certainly comedy to be found in these basic situations, but not in "Lucky Louie's" confounding approach or stilted presentation.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    This show is slickly packaged and unchallengingly trite in its slavish reality-show construction.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Despite the storylines' incessant emotional and psychological delvings, the result is an inert if not annoying muddle among unpleasantly profane people whose prospective salvation isn't worth wading toward.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Carpoolers is like a flimsy "Saturday Night Live" skit pounded home and running on beyond endurance. Actors sputter their lines, dither and whimper like some 1950s sitcom.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    A second-rate knockoff of what's not quite a first-rate fabrication itself.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    ABC must be loco throwing Lopez to the critical wolves like this. [27 Mar 2002, p.B31]
    • Newsday
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Make a list of sitcom cliche shtick, and you'd find it all here. The eye-bulging hard-trying line sell. The ba-dum-bum punch line rhythm. The motormouth babbling to signify "wackiness." The louder- the-better sense of comedy. Even the family visit where members enter a room precisely a peculiar eight paces apart so each has time for an entrance "joke." [27 Feb 2003, p.B31]
    • Newsday
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Diane Werts
    Too many moments feel false, overblown or contrived.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    All the eyeliner in the world can't make Cleve intriguing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    TBS' entry only lacks "Sex and the City's" craft in writing, characterizations, plot, production and wit.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    Some amusing bits, but for every one of those, there are 10 misfires.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    What this show isn't: fresh, witty or even well constructed.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    This new version looks like Franco moved on to something else long before he finished it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    Blunt Talk aspires to "Network's" kinetically brilliant madness. It arrives a limp and muddled mess.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Diane Werts
    Not worth sitting through for the scenery when you can switch to Travel Channel.

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