For 135 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Eric Hynes' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Little Fugitive (re-release)
Lowest review score: 20 Hot Summer Days (Chuen sing yit luen - yit lat lat)
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 135
  2. Negative: 15 out of 135
135 movie reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Eric Hynes
    There's influential, and then there's this 1953 microbudgeted beauty, one that's made its way into the DNA of everything from cinema vérité to the French New Wave.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    With tinkling thriller music and dramatic voiceover narration, this modest but engrossing first-person documentary comes on like a true crime caper.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    The Law is everything that this season’s lackluster blockbusters are not: a damn good time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Uniting Sacha Baron Cohen's daredevilry with Werner Herzog's bombast, Brügger aims to expose "the evilness of North Korea" with a gloriously incoherent, kazoo-and-whoopee-cushion–inflected stage show starring a self-proclaimed "spastic."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    What elevates The Sky Turns beyond a lovely little elegy and into the realm of greatness is Álvarez's refusal to shape the film as a tragedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    It's a sickening but stunning portrait of combat that looks past notions of bravery or brutality, guilt or innocence, to bear witness to a thoroughly besieged humanity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    What Lost Bohemia lacks in aesthetic presentation - first-time filmmaker Astor seems to have gathered footage without much forethought - is made up for by an intimacy familiar from home movies, revealing eccentric neighbors at their most frank and endearing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    The first major motion picture to come out of Congo in decades happens to be one of the best neonoirs from anywhere in recent memory.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Majewski's film is a dazzling master class in visual composition.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    The unveiling is unnerving, and suggests that some dangers are now permanently beyond our control.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Armed with archival footage and wrenching interviews, filmmaker Chad Freidrichs revisits one of our nation's darkest hours - and emerges with a scrupulous, revelatory consideration of the varied factors that turned a worthy plan into a horrific, state-sanctioned nightmare for a generation of working-class African-Americans.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    The only time a subject directly addresses Takesue, it's with a doozy of a query: "Why are you taking my story to USA, New York?" The answer is as complex as the film itself, and as simple as deciding to not look away.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Attenberg shares with the Oscar-nominated "Dogtooth" a weakness for overgrown innocence and deadpan perversity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Brazilian filmmaker Júlia Murat's first narrative feature is a mesmerizing, slow-build marvel.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Alice Rohrwacher's debut fictional feature is an uncommonly insightful portrait of nascent womanhood, assisted in no small measure by Vianello's disarmingly naturalistic performance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    There are subtler, more allusive films about stormy conflicts of the heart, but A Burning Hot Summer wisely knows when and how to surgically slice directly to the bone. It's a bad romance of the highest order.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Truthfully, watching septuagenarian whores spank mildly titillated johns and test-drive sex toys has never seemed so ho-hum - or so oddly familiar.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    The most "Naked City"–worthy aspect is the film's temperature, fixed precisely between cool posturing and broiling anomie. Its vision of contemporary Thailand is recognizable as another society undeserving of redemption, but worthy of poetry.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Despite being the subject of nearly every shot in the film, Hoss maintains an air of mystery, simultaneously projecting severity, sensitivity and sensuousness throughout.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Miller’s ace in the hole is the hulking, regal Harper, whose round face vacillates between childlike mirth and lung-stomping sadness. His casual charisma not only commands our attention and affection, it sidelines every social or thematic concern to this singular, tentatively aspiring life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Plays like a gothic prequel to David Cronenberg's "A Dangerous Method," one in which human flesh is viewed as both horrific and erotic terrain.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    What elevates the film is a pervasive, palpable sense of loss — between lover and beloved, young and old, stage and screen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    It’s a human-size tragedy, one that shows how deadening it can be to remain subject to those who give us life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    he wild-eyed Celedón and stealthily empathetic Saavedra introduce a farcical element to this otherwise mournful milieu, but the tonal clashes yield something genuinely cathartic, if also ultimately irresolvable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    It’s a film defined by momentum, by the spectacle of an unformed young man rapidly becoming someone.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Working from a script by playwright Darci Picoult, Dosunmu fashions a tale that’s realistic, melodramatic and culturally specific (we spend as much time ogling colorfully patterned dresses as we do admiring Gurira’s endlessly expressive face), yet unmistakably archetypal.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    From the sun’s surface to the deep earth, Hawaiian volcanoes to Detroit’s decay, Mettler explores the different ways that we experience and define time, using his own documentary as a mind-bending demonstration of its mutability.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Mike Eley’s gorgeously saturated cinematography helps elevate the boys’ struggle into the realm of the heroic, but it’s the two young stars — one a whirlwind and the other a quiet protector — who make this only-slightly tall tale into something towering.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    A train station finale is textbook tearjerker territory, but it still teems with exquisite sorrow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Director Madeleine Sackler favors an agenda of advocacy over complexity, making The Lottery an effective, if unapologetically one-sided, piece of agitprop.