Farran Smith Nehme
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For 240 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Act of Killing
Lowest review score: 0 Sirius
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 240
240 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The young, novice actors are charming, but they haven’t completely mastered the art of natural-sounding dialogue.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In a way, this marvelous movie does show that the Mekons have declined, because they’ve become the one thing punk rockers never ever want to be: lovable.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Soviet era is more interesting than the NHL years, but still, the film is entertaining even for ardent nonfans.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Hoogendijk ends the movie just before the museum reopens; but her last, soaring image is a stirring vision of what made all the agita worthwhile.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are so many echoes of “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” that it starts to feel like a barely disguised sequel. But those reminders, and the rather trite journey-of-self plot, are just decoration. This tender film works to remind us of how much we still love Deneuve, and succeeds in scene after scene.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Lore is the sort of movie you’d already expect to rip your heart out, but that doesn’t diminish the tragedy when it does arrive.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Terry’s talent is so magical that you may wish there were longer snippets of his playing. Still, this is a wonderful portrait of two artists strengthened by friendship.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A groundbreaking, highly influential film, A Man Vanishes is a fiercely brilliant piece of work, but it's more intellectual challenge than pleasure.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The results are remarkably intelligent and entertaining, even for someone who (like this writer) finds Cave’s music rather dirge-like.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Darci Picoult’s script renders all of these characters, if not always sympathetically, humanly and fully.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Breakup at a Wedding works, because Quinaz has come up with a concept that lets him skewer directorial pretension alongside wedding hysteria.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The closing subtitle says that no one was ever prosecuted for this madness. The pure-archive approach leaves a taste of despair; civic governance, it seems, can’t even promise not to kill you.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    If this documentary is swift and witty, that’s in part because it relies heavily on clips of Orson Welles talking. And oh, how Welles could talk, that beautiful voice wrapping itself around tall tales and wine commercials with equal grace.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is nominated for this year’s Best Foreign Film Oscar, and it doesn’t deserve to snatch the prize from the towering likes of “Ida,” “Timbuktu” or “Leviathan.” Yet in its gaudy, predictable way, Wild Tales is enormous fun, and the consistent wit of the quiet stretches shows there’s more to Szifrón than shock tactics.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Wall winds up as a captivating fable, an end-times scenario that’s more about the survival of the spirit than the body.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a sympathetic portrait of an artist whose heart lay more with new work than old glories, right up to the end.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a truly interesting slasher fest; in this one, the heroine gets to be both beauty and beast.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie's most exciting when the precision and jaw-dropping nerve of the gang holds center stage.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a film heavily dependent on tone and atmosphere for its charm, the budding relationship shown through things like a lovely twilight bike ride down a hill to the shops below.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    We know Paris never went anywhere, and the film’s a little too flashy and theatrical, with too-neat ironies. As a duel between acting talents, though, this is first-rate.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The bright palette of Reality is an obvious way to underline the hero’s unraveling, but it looks good, and it works.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In addition to the magnificent music, the movie takes its rumpled charm from Fry's unfeigned fanboy manner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is both elegiac and amazingly retro, like the nature specials that baby boomers were weaned on - although it's not for animal lovers, unless you have a specific grudge against sables. "Happy People" is the title, but it's virtually all men.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In the poignant, symmetrical end, Touré leaves the idea that the real yearning of these people is for a fair shake in their own home.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Directors Matthew Pond and Kirk Marcolina wisely keep this unrepentant charmer, in her 80s during filming, on-camera, save for when they’re interviewing fascinated writers and fed-up prosecutors.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    John Maloof’s documentary has an opening both apt and witty: Talking heads, one after the other, struck dumb by the mystery at hand.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    For those willing to lock into Reygadas’ mad wavelength, the beauty is worth the puzzlement.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Meier's tight focus on her primary characters pays off: Seydoux brings a strong array of emotions to a highly unsympathetic part. And Klein, whether plugging his ears with cigarette filters or suddenly embracing a woman he barely knows, is heartbreaking.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is built from moving, frank interviews with survivors from two families who hid, speaking over and around extensive re-enactments. Passages from the memoir of one family matriarch, Esther Stermer, in many ways the heroine of the tale, also are used as narration.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The evidence Jarecki amasses against the drug wars in The House I Live In is more than strong enough to withstand any excess rhetorical zeal.

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