Farran Smith Nehme
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For 261 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 43 out of 261
261 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is both elegiac and amazingly retro, like the nature specials that baby boomers were weaned on - although it's not for animal lovers, unless you have a specific grudge against sables. "Happy People" is the title, but it's virtually all men.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In the poignant, symmetrical end, Touré leaves the idea that the real yearning of these people is for a fair shake in their own home.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Directors Matthew Pond and Kirk Marcolina wisely keep this unrepentant charmer, in her 80s during filming, on-camera, save for when they’re interviewing fascinated writers and fed-up prosecutors.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    John Maloof’s documentary has an opening both apt and witty: Talking heads, one after the other, struck dumb by the mystery at hand.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    For those willing to lock into Reygadas’ mad wavelength, the beauty is worth the puzzlement.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Meier's tight focus on her primary characters pays off: Seydoux brings a strong array of emotions to a highly unsympathetic part. And Klein, whether plugging his ears with cigarette filters or suddenly embracing a woman he barely knows, is heartbreaking.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is built from moving, frank interviews with survivors from two families who hid, speaking over and around extensive re-enactments. Passages from the memoir of one family matriarch, Esther Stermer, in many ways the heroine of the tale, also are used as narration.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The evidence Jarecki amasses against the drug wars in The House I Live In is more than strong enough to withstand any excess rhetorical zeal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The on-camera experts make intelligent, earnest points, but the Web means there’s no such thing as a real ban. Indeed the movies have always been available, as two former neo-Nazis point out.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    These elisions give an odd feeling to a film so long in the making. Crewdson's work ultimately begins to seem less enigmatic than he is himself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Eerie and utterly riveting.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    For a long while, director Benjamin Epps goes for breakneck farce; at its best, this is a batty mixture of family-values editorial and teen spoof.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It's never dull though, and the familiar characters and stock motivations are convincingly put across. And there's always Xu, who's turned to acupuncture to suppress his empathy, as you wait for the inevitable moment when suppressing it won't be enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This film loves its characters, but loves their ideals even more.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A remarkable attempt to portray what might turn soccer-playing boys into fanatical murderers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Swift and often compelling, it’s also blessedly unbiased.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Brooklyn Castle is an engaging tale, and the principal is wrong: These kids are much more lovable than the Yankees.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The conceit is slight, but Hong's playful structure conceals sharp observations about fantasies, communication, and how foreigners and natives interact.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beautiful to look at, with its burnished interiors and magnificent Turkish steppes, this long film builds to a powerful conclusion. Ceylan’s characters grind each other to a powder while hardly raising their voices.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In short, the crows are pests, but the movie shows them great affection, as do the humans who discuss the ways they must accommodate the crows. After a while it is impossible not to admire the birds’ intelligence and resilience, and see that perhaps it’s the other way around: The crows are the ones putting up with us.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Tamhane’s quiet techniques build to pure, cold fury.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is the penultimate film of Albert Maysles, who died on March 5, and Iris has a bit in common with “Grey Gardens,” his masterpiece. Apfel, unlike the Edies of that movie, is sane — so much so that the movie’s main flaw is lack of conflict. Iris’ marriage to Carl, who turned 100 during filming, is incredibly sweet.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Europe’s immigration dilemma was also the focus of Aki Kaurismaki’s winsome “Le Havre,” and the Africans themselves were front and center in Moussa Touré’s “La Pirogue.” This film is somewhat less effective; Crialese’s message seems to take priority over a deeper sense of individuals.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Technically, the film isn’t terribly exciting: talking heads interspersed with shots of young people making their symbolic “leap of faith” from the walls. But the directors have chosen eloquent interviewees, and the passionate attachment they feel for their city gives the film heart.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winocour skillfully films Augustine being exhibited for other doctors in several disturbingly erotic scenes, but elsewhere Soko’s stolid, one-note demeanor takes a toll. The script, which gives Augustine no background and mostly shows her either being “treated” or having an episode, doesn’t help.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are no surprises, but for once there’s a set of artsy millennial characters who feel like real humans, and Berlin looks great.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Dolan embraces passion and melodrama to a refreshing degree, and Dorval and Clément are terrific. But Mommy can be exhausting; the structure and plot rhythms are all over everywhere. A montage to “Wonderwall” (every last note of it) seems to sum up the movie; too much, but exhilarating all the same.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s endearing how this glorified haunted-house movie tries to reclaim all the old tools, and do so with a straight face and a PG-13 level of violence.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The final scenes, when Mancini meets Kim’s son, have the awkward feel of an “Oprah” episode, with the editing and music suggesting a catharsis that isn’t always backed up by what’s on-screen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s sprightly, funny and at times piercingly sad.

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