Farran Smith Nehme
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For 211 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 A Hijacking
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 211
211 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ultimately, this film reveals the Israeli self-image, but not much more. The people with the cameras pass by Arab neighbors, and what the Palestinians’ home movies might look like remains unexplored.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a compelling story, and Minac has told it before, notably in 2002’s “The Power of Good: Nicholas Winton.” This new documentary seems aimed at a classroom audience.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie was largely improvised, which lends itself more to scenes than a feature-length film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beck expressed dismay that “Pimp” was taken as a glamorization of his life, and not a warning. By omitting the experiences of the women who worked for him, the filmmakers risk the same thing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Cardinale’s few brief scenes are the ones with the most depth; her facial lines really did come along with some wisdom.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Farahani determinedly underplays her character, and is often very touching. But while there is a satisfying final scene, The Patience Stone is essentially a monologue, and Atiq Rahimi (directing the adaptation of his own novel) doesn’t have what it takes to make the story more dynamic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Una Noche is intriguing enough, however, to make you hope that both Mulloy and her actors are heard from again, sooner rather than later.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The tone teeters between delicate and affected, and there’s only so much flitting around and soulful stares a movie can sustain before an audience starts wanting something more earthbound.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The second half is therefore much more interesting than the first; even so, the whole movie suffers from a lack of narrative momentum and a surfeit of wordless shots of men exchanging deep, meaningful glances.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a mildly interesting thriller — Paris through the eyes of a director who doesn’t know how to make its beauty menacing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The densely plotted Generation War sweeps past implausibilities and offers the can’t-put-it-down qualities of a superior airport novel; its last third is affecting. But a bold confrontation with the past? Not so much.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The New Black often feels like a polished but uninspired op-ed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a slickly plotted ticking-time-bomb thriller with a crisp look and one standout debut performance, by Hitham Omari as a ruthless leader of a terrorist cell.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The filmmaking style is practically nonexistent: interviews and static shots of the performers onstage. They are thoughtful and often funny, especially Mat Fraser, a British man whose arms were damaged by Thalidomide, and Julia Atlas Muz, the off-stage partner with whom he often performs.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Pretty and pleasing, but no more. A bon-bon, not a meal.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    As reactions to budding sexuality go, it’s a little extreme. And it’s also contrived; Isabelle’s decision never makes any emotional, let alone logical, sense.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Directors Aron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly overload their too-long film with subplots. Yet the actors — including a terrific Aiden Gillen (“Game of Thrones”) as Casper’s no-good father — perform as though unaware that any of this is a cliché.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    More a tribute to youth and its discontents than a fresh exploration.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The photographs on view are dazzling; the way they are shown here is somewhat less so.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cast, so packed with talent that Jean Reno and Cherry Jones barely register, is stuck with stagey dialogue. Juliet Rylance, in the Nina part, has a particularly hard time. But there are good points, including Janney’s obvious pleasure in her part.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Aside from an additional 30 minutes or so of plot, Trade of Innocents offers no more than a middling episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit."
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    It's deeply frustrating to discover that this 2012 movie has precisely the same concerns as the ["The Women"] - appearance and men - with raunchy frankness about sex added and every trace of real wit siphoned out.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot, however, comes with twists you can spot as far off as a Himalayan peak. The dialogue is heavily expository, and the actors are not up to the task of breathing life into characters meant to symbolize the Spirit of the Afghan People or the Nature of Evil.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot is predictable, as complications line up like jets awaiting takeoff. Even the camera work is predictable: The attractive-girl's-scary-boyfriend-suddenly-pops-up shot; the morning-after, face-in-the-pillow shot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    What you get instead of soccer is almost two hours of late-stage syphilis.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Allegiance works better as a way of reminding us who does the fighting in this age of outsourcing than it does as a human drama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The director has cited "Inglourious Basterds" as paving the way for his own movie; but for all his boldness, Quentin Tarantino avoided the camps altogether. My Best Enemy shows the camps only briefly, but once it does, it becomes both too much, and not enough. Once you see even a long shot of such a place, the impulse to find humor in much of anything is gone.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Part of the limp-rag ambience is due to Talt, who seems to be channeling Sarah Jessica Parker — which, unsurprisingly, does not work. Mostly it’s due to the script, which fails to meet the major romantic-comedy requirement of being clever about keeping lovers apart. All by itself, “The hero is kind of a drip” doesn’t cut it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is like an hour and a half listening to someone bellyache about her landlord.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The last topic is the hook for audience members not related to Gregory or Kleine, but just as insight appears, back we go to Kleine's tediously selfreferential narration.