For 321 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Private Fears in Public Places
Lowest review score: 0 Chapter 27
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 321
321 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    The intellectual aspirations of this series are just window dressing. Which left this viewer to enjoy the freeway chase sequence (which really is cool), Hugo Weaving’s smirk, and even the PlayStationish stuff.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    There's much visual inventiveness and a good sense of fun here. But I was expecting something more spectacular.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Singleton’s film is, in fact, pretty enjoyable if you look at it as the B-movie it really ought to be, rather than the E-ticket major studio release it actually is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Northfork feels like the work of a couple of ardent art students who, for whatever reson, are very keen on pleasing their teacher. [July/August 2003, p. 23]
    • Premiere
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Hobbled by weak argumentation, a character who winds up a complete muddle, and Sayles’s inclination to romanticize Latin American revolutionary types, Casa is as mixed an effort as the filmmaker has essayed in some time. [October 2003, p. 18]
    • Premiere
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    A modestly scaled film on every level, but Hedges and company manage to ring true on almost all the material's sweet and sour notes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    On the plus side, there are these super-scary mechanical octopus-type things with a billion eyes and metal tentacles that fly in great awful swarms and look like the non-organic versions of the flying-brain-and-spinal-cord monsters that made the otherwise laughable '60s sci-fi flick "Fiend Without aFace" so cool.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Depends on how you're feeling about Tom Cruise--as opposed to the character he's putatively playing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Proves more irksome than moving.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Unfortunately, the reach of The Return exceeds its grasp, and so this film of gruffly beautiful images didn't put a hook in me the way Zvyagintsev so ardently seems to want it to. [March 2003, p. 27]
    • Premiere
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    As a meditation of American life, Greendale is anything but coherent, but it is fluidly free-associative and shows bizarre wit, as when Young himself shows up to play Wayne Newton. [March 2004, p. 27]
    • Premiere
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    If there was ever an example of a movie's visual language leaving its verbal and narrative components in the dust, this, unfortunately, is it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    While brisk, informative, and entertaining, feels frustratingly sketchy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Scarlett Johansson looks lovely and hasn't much to do besides that, McGregor only starts having fun when he's playing the "original" of his clone.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Though this new Hills is both scarier and smarter than 95 percent of the other horror product out there, it's also indicative of everything that's wrong with horror movies today.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    All this stuff is enacted by a better-than-reliable cast (Griffin Dunne, Robert Downey Jr., Catherine O'Hara, Roger Rees, and more), so Game 6 is never a bore. But it's not much more besides never a bore.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    One of Cruise's most deeply cherished ambitions is to be a great actor, and this movie goes to great lengths to let him do that--sort of. You'll understand what I mean during the sequence in which there is more than one Philip Seymour Hoffman on the screen.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Compelling and exasperating in pretty much equal doses.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Diverting and often funny enough, largely thanks (as is not unusual in cases like this) to its cast.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Part of what makes these kind of war movies such cinematic comfort food (aside from the moral certainty they strive to convey) is their familiarity. But I wonder if said familiarity is what compels contemporary filmmakers to overstuff the material -- Flyboys is a good two hours and 20 minutes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    For my money, if I'm in the mood for the kind of aesthetic and emotional experience Saints is selling, I'll just blast Jim Carroll's more concise (and rocking!) "People Who Died" out of my iPod.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Understanding what McGrath is trying to pull off is not the same thing as McGrath pulling it off; as ambitious as it is, Infamous falters in execution too often to create a lasting impression.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    One casting wild card is the country singer Tim McGraw, and he's very solid in the role of Katie's horse-rancher dad, the kind of guy whose hard-headedness can't mask the size of his heart.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    If the resultant wreckage is a little underwhelming, and the film's coda useless and trite, the getting there is pretty absorbing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Chris Rock's I Think I Love My Wife is less interesting, and less successful, as a remake of a much-bruited '70s art film than it is as a compendium of Rockian observations on the current state of the African-American bourgeoisie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    It does move along at a nice clip, and delivers exactly what belligerent action fans on both sides of the political aisle want -- a wholly admirable figure blowing up a lot of bad s---.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Vacancy could have been some sort of satirical masterpiece had this whole scenario been finally revealed as an extreme form of couple's therapy designed to get Beckinsale and Wilson back together.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Those who still relish the sight of Anthony Hopkins portraying an evil criminal mastermind will get the most out of Fracture, which is not so much a whodunit -- we see Hopkins' character putting a bullet in his wife's head in the movie's first few minutes -- as a howdunnit.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Its punchline, imagining the worst that could happen to Auteuil's slimy exec, is weak and kind of dumb, but the rest of the film is genial, appealing, and brisk.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    This incarnation of Spider Man seems to forget that its source material was a comic book that wanted to transcend its genre. This is a movie that's content to be pretty good within its genre, with the main distinction of being much bigger than any of its competition.