For 372 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Hard to Be a God
Lowest review score: 0 Chapter 27
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 36 out of 372
372 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    What to make of it all? Hard to say. Just to take in the fact that its soundtrack is made up of music by both J. Spaceman and Sun City Girls is to understand that this is a picture that's divided against itself in a way that's perhaps too hermetic to be comprehended.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    For whatever its flaws, Redbelt offers up a good deal of Mametian red meat while also trying to break out of some of the strictures that Mamet's erected around his own work.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    This is not a film occurring in an alternate or imaginary reality; rather, it is a film of NO reality, that is, a picture that changes the rules of its universe strictly according to its creators' whims.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The drama Dom Hemingway explores involves a vicious lout finding a form of redemption, and while that's an all-too conventional scenario, Shepard's movie plays it out in a brisk, inventive fashion and delivers a moviegoing experience that's almost equal parts stingingly sharp and genuinely sweet.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The Signal continues to get weirder, and creepier, and to bring up unusual questions for the viewer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    While it doesn’t hit the highs of the very best movies based on the author’s works — those would be Steven Soderbergh’s “Out of Sight” and Quentin Tarantino’s “Jackie Brown,” two outstanding examples of American narrative cinema of the ‘90s—it’s also far less slick and ingratiating than the watchable but very Hollywood-processed likes of “Get Shorty” and “Be Cool.”
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Even though Wetlands is absolutely, brutally unrelenting in its depictions of bodily functions and searching adolescent sexuality, it’s also an inventively sharp, briskly edited, spectacularly-acted post-adolescent coming-of-age story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    My Old Lady is pretty compelling viewing, mostly thanks to Kline, who gives a career-high performance here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The Homestretch invites you to empathize with its subjects, to worry with them, to laugh with them, to worry about them. It’s engaging and compelling viewing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    That the filmmakers are able to pursue their theme to the extent that the true story on which the film is based obliges them to somehow has to be credited to Renner. His performance is very good, despite the somewhat stereotypical bro characteristics with which the Webb character is here endowed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The terrific cast all delves into the material full-bore, which contributes to its peculiar resonance. Perry may hate everyone and everything, but in making a show of it, he’s thoroughly entertaining.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    To tell you the truth, The Better Angels, as pictorially beautiful and emotionally evocative as it is, is so bereft of conventional narrative momentum that you have to consider it a miracle it got made.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The Way He Looks is a modest and good-hearted film that leaves a clean impression: you’re glad to have spent time with the people in it, for sure. But if you’re someone whose own specific circumstances are substantively different from those of the characters, the sense of a pleasant visit is pretty much it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Haupt’s film moves along agreeably enough for a while, and the intercutting between the film’s real-life subjects, now at an advanced age, and their dramatized adventures almost 60 years ago, convincingly creates a rooting interest.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Whatever its shortcomings, “Magician” accomplishes quite a bit as a corrective, and it also gives one an hour and a half in the company of Orson Welles. That in and of itself is worth at least a three-star rating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    There’s a lot of good awkward fun to be had as the viewer simultaneously laughs at Otto’s expense and hopefully commiserates a bit with him.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    A very nearly epic romance, one that approaches the idea of a ménage-a-trois as emblematic of a particular idealism on the part of its participants rather than a hotsy-totsy taboo-busting arrangement.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Match has enough meaty and engaging character material to effectively sidestep the very theatrical contrivance of its plot premise, which does have a great deal of potential for reversal and counter reversal and indeed takes full advantage of that potential.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The irony of Peck’s position is, while he’s on the rise as a choreographer, as a dancer he’s in a rather more plebian position, which provides the movie with a punchline that Lipes neither overstates nor shrugs off.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    A Danish revenge Western starring Mads Mikkelsen, is a very real movie, and it is directed by Kristian Levring (“The King Is Alive”), whose sensibility is a little more nuanced than that of the sensationalist Refn, which is all to this movie’s benefit.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The consequences of seemingly innocuous careless moments, the inexorability of fate, and the possibility of grace or just mere reconciliation in the face of disheartening catastrophe: these are the themes of Bluebird.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Throughout the picture, Bernstein interacts with genteel folk who quietly deplore what they see as the American perception of art and art-making.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Genre fans ought to check it out post haste. I’m one myself, and my admiration for the superb conception and execution of the film goes hand in hand with disappointment and irritation.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    A tart, funny, moderately over-the-top hijinks-and-snafus yarn.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Strikes me as more of a thesis piece than anything LaBute has put his name to thus far. Its characters don't seem to be people as much as they are stand-ins for ideas.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    The intellectual aspirations of this series are just window dressing. Which left this viewer to enjoy the freeway chase sequence (which really is cool), Hugo Weaving’s smirk, and even the PlayStationish stuff.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    There's much visual inventiveness and a good sense of fun here. But I was expecting something more spectacular.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Singleton’s film is, in fact, pretty enjoyable if you look at it as the B-movie it really ought to be, rather than the E-ticket major studio release it actually is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Northfork feels like the work of a couple of ardent art students who, for whatever reson, are very keen on pleasing their teacher. [July/August 2003, p. 23]
    • Premiere
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Hobbled by weak argumentation, a character who winds up a complete muddle, and Sayles’s inclination to romanticize Latin American revolutionary types, Casa is as mixed an effort as the filmmaker has essayed in some time. [October 2003, p. 18]
    • Premiere

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