For 842 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Ratatouille
Lowest review score: 0 Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Score distribution:
842 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    The bohemian paradise of this environment had a dark side, and the movie doesn’t give it short shrift. Nevertheless, a genuine exhilaration holds throughout.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    A low-key and intelligent character study, Miss Stevens doesn’t escape from its indie-film commonplaces often enough to become really distinctive, but it has enough conscientiousness about its people that it doesn’t let the commonplaces fester into movie-sinking clichés.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Despite its best efforts, Tanna drifts into a mode of exoticism that renders it an ultimately frustrating experience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    By the jaw-dropping climax (an argument over a family portrait), and the film’s not-entirely unpredictable denouement, you aren’t sure whether you are witnessing an investigative family chronicle or an act of revenge.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    The depredations of the Nazis are depicted in a way that will make viewers want to declare war on Germany anew. But Come What May is also too pretty of a movie. It is often sentimental and, worse, schematic.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Glenn Kenny
    As conventional and stiff as Max Rose itself is, Lewis’ performance in it is full of virtues: he’s committed, disciplined, and entirely credible.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Kenny
    Some of Mr. Smith’s prior work made me laugh so hard that I cried; Yoga Hosers made me want to cry for different reasons.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger is a challenging, sometimes poignant engagement with the man and his work.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie does pretty well as a treatment of identity and selfhood in a social landscape that grows increasingly alienating as it becomes more transparent. But it somehow fails to wholly satisfy.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Glenn Kenny
    Mechanic: Resurrection suffers from a storyline and script that strains credulity and insults intelligence even by the low bar set by the majority of contemporary action movies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Hands of Stone...is absolutely a boxing movie. A corny and sometimes clumsy one, it scatters pleasures here and there, Mr. De Niro’s alert performance among them.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    I’m not qualified to say whether it’s an effective delivery system for its Christian message, but I think I can credibly pronounce it a good popcorn movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Kenny
    The action is gorgeously fluid, the idiosyncratic 3-D visual conceits (including floating eyeballs undersea) are startling, and the story and its metaphors resolve in unexpected and moving ways.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The issues presented in When Two Worlds Collide are so crucial that it feels churlish to characterize it as a dutiful, and ultimately pedestrian, documentary. There is something evasive about it as well.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Anthropoid has one hell of a story to tell, a story that once again reminds us of a savagery that is not so far in humanity’s past that we need to stop being reminded of it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    An efficient and pleasurable bad-man-tries-to-go-good exposition that gives Gibson ample opportunity to flex his now-somewhat-grizzled movie-star muscle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    Mr. Baena (who, with David O. Russell, wrote the tricky 2004 “I ♥ Huckabees”) is more accomplished than many microbudget filmmakers, and the looseness with which he imbues the middle section of Joshy is deceptive, creating a sense that the necessary emotional crash might not actually occur.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    This sentimental, nearly genteel movie demonstrates there’s a world of difference between invoking magic and conjuring it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    This is not a picture about which extravagant claims ought to be made; it really is, in the end, an hour and change in a London disco in 1984. But as a page from an artist’s notebook, and a time capsule curio, it rates pretty high.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s prime mover, Rogen, is a doge of stoner humor, and he shows incredible discipline in this film by saving the first weed joke for twenty minutes in. I commend him for that.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s relentless one-note tone makes its final twist, such as it is, entirely predictable and pat.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    While not an earth-shaker, this movie is an amiable and informative look at a guy who is shaping up to be, yes, one of the major American directors of the last fifty years.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The Land won’t win any awards for originality of premise. And the movie, after that premise comes into play, tends to meander more than a suspense story ought to. It meanders for the best reason, though, which is to help the viewer get to know the characters.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Kenny
    Schamus’ commitment to a style, and to the material, yields potent results.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    Each individual shot creates a frisson of desolation that resonates far beyond the facile irony suggested by the movie’s title.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    Gleason is incredibly frank about Gleason’s physical suffering and the toll his terrifyingly implacable physical deterioration takes on his marriage.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The performances in the picture are all solid, but what makes Summertime really refreshing is that it doesn’t treat its central romance as anything but wholly normal, despite the attitude of other characters, or indeed, the tenor of the time in which it is set.
    • 2 Metascore
    • 0 Glenn Kenny
    According to a certain interpretation of the auteur theory, a film’s value derives from the extent to which it communicates the personality and character of its director. Judged by that standard alone, I suppose “Hillary’s America” is some kind of masterpiece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    The betrayal of Native Americans by larger forces looms over this powerful movie without ever being explicitly discussed.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s actual entertainment value rises considerably during the dialogue-free sequences.

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