For 604 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Back in the Game: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 99 out of 604
604 tv reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    HBO’s mildly funny yet thematically redundant half-hour series.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The humor is smart-ish and has more bite and suggestive raunch than you’d expect.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The Event is an intentional mess, daring you to go wherever it thinks it's going. Within the first five minutes, potential viewers will have to make their own personal choice: Am I up for this?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Though I do not begrudge Ray Donovan its sense of momentum or tension, I was immediately struck by a desire to simply see more of Ray doing his job for a few episodes rather than seeing him deal with his brothers’ various problems.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The Show With Vinny, a contrived hybrid of a reality series and a talk show, is a surprisingly sweet exercise in hospitality and good cheer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Although no expense has been spared, House of Cards appears to suffer from the same ambitious but weighty seriousness that afflicted Starz's "Boss."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Perhaps Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt will eventually find a way to be a show worthy of all this talk and expectation, rather than the B-/C+ attempt at a network show that Fey and Carlock have delivered. There’s not much special about it, so far, except the lucky circumstances of its survival.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    A sharply-made if slightly off-putting reality series that follows different advertising agencies each week as they compete for new accounts.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    It’s hard to believe that Grease was once subversive; what viewers saw on television Sunday night seemed somehow cleaner and more perfunctory and cute. It was a fabulous, well-scrubbed and flawlessly executed show that could have been just a little bit greasier.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    An intriguing but often clumsy new movie about the making of the TV show.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The new episodes push the saga in a few initially intriguing directions, but the cast keeps expanding into an overpopulated mishmash of disparate story threads that no longer weave together as a whole.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The result is a gentle, respectful and thorough biography that is 100 minutes of no news and no fresh insights.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    1600 Penn comes off as a fairly formulaic yet occasionally bright return to an old premise.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    It’s hard to deny that The Leftovers can be both visually and emotionally arresting. It is also hard to deny that it is absolutely no fun to watch, a fact that doesn’t necessarily lead one to abandon it. The addition of a new family in Jarden/Miracle, the Murphys--headed by strong new cast members Kevin Carroll and recent Emmy-winner Regina King--is reason enough to tread lightly and see if Lindelof, et al, have worked out some of the kinks when it comes to pacing and payoff.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Hallmark Channel’s warm but sometimes thin adaptation of The Watsons Go to Birmingham, based on Christopher Paul Curtis’s award-winning children’s book, is at first a welcome departure from the network’s usual Slanket-ready movies.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Under the Dome does have an air of King’s more sinister tendencies, but not enough of them in the first hour to suggest the sort of horror that’s worth sticking around for.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Believe works best as a relentless chase scene. The first episode (directed by Cuarón) has some limberness to its movement, but, like so much else in this particular genre, produces a lukewarm result.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The show gets off to a serviceable start--coolly conceived and professionally directed, at least in the one episode shared with critics. Where it goes from here is anybody’s guess at this point, but Extant’s creator and cast seem to be taking things seriously enough as a work of sci-fi origami, folded and layered with a certain precision.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Allegiance’s real mission, like “The Americans,” is to draw us into a believable family crisis and, in that regard, the show’s results are mixed. Some performances are strong (particularly from Davis and Stenhouse) and the first three episodes demonstrate a knack for getting everyone — viewers included--to hang together off the same cliff right at the 57-minute mark.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Darabont and his cast excel at conjuring up a taut social study, but let the horror scenes fall oddly flat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    [An] ambivalent but mildly engrossing new docu-series.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    There is something to like in Alcatraz's smooth momentum. The show has a spirit that comes through in spite of the flavorless cheese crumbles piled atop it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    It isn't brilliant television, but everyone in it seems to be giving it their all--even the corpses.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    House of Cards is almost willfully and sadistically atonal. Its schemes and subplots and internecine politics undulate and intertwine with a suffocating kind of flatness. I find these new episodes watchable yet sterile.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Meant to celebrate innovation and entrepreneurial can-do spirit, Quirky instead eerily reflects the vapidity of the American economy and employment picture, where ideas trump labor and success is measured by top-level paydays instead of actual toil.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Homeland is wearing a bit thin even while it nobly stays the course.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    All of these characters and situations are mildly interesting, but it's difficult to know from just a couple of episodes if they're ever going to become desperately interesting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Coven is the first time American Horror Story gets started with the unmistakable feeling of timecards being punched, as an ensemble of big-name stars dutifully carry forward the show’s trademark fixation on style over substance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Scouted gives the first impression of merely being a show about models, it turns out to be a watchable session of human sacrifice lite.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    It is, as always, beautifully filmed and patiently assembled. Everyone in it clearly believes in the project (and the city) down to their bones, even if the writers have shortchanged their best actors this time. What comes through most is a feeling of over-indulgence--one drink too many, one plate of etouffee too far, one too many hangovers and five too many episodes of an otherwise memorable series.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The first four episodes of this new season have the same raw and gritty-cool feel as the first season's (it takes no time at all for Dunham to bare her now-famously doughy naked body in a sex scene), but the show has become significantly more predictable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Vice seems to be in search of some sweet spot between “60 Minutes” and “Jackass,” and there’s enough here to suggest that such a spot may exist. The concept could work, especially if Smith and his correspondents were more inclined to point the cameras away from themselves.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Ascension is a handsomely made riff on an irresistibly interesting story pitch.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    For its epic investment, Living in the Material World still feels like only part of the story.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    It’s as watchable as ever, and also as unsatisfying as ever, as it veers toward the helter-skelter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The script can be remedially hokey, but Saldana turns in a feisty and believable performance as a mother fighting for the life of her unholy spawn.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Viewers who stuck with Peter Pan Live! for three hours were treated to a technically adequate, charmingly performed night of retro theater-on-television.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Circus has no difficulty finding all the usual, romantically enthralling ideals contained within circus life, which unfortunately causes a lot of the series to feel predictable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Luck is suffused with brilliant acting and amazing scenes, but in a few unfortunate ways, it remains impenetrable almost until its last hour.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The show is best when it busies itself with messy bucolic details--the milking of goats, the shearing of llamas, the wallowing of pigs--instead of wallowing in the dysfunctional mud and frantic entrepreneurism that render Josh and Brent blind to the beauty and love around them.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The results are, of course, compelling but also assiduously sterilized.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The show offers an excess of mildly clever yet sincere goofiness. It’s as if someone set out to make a Spamalot for an audience that can’t quite grok Python, would find Into the Woods too morose and maybe missed half the pop-culture references in the Shrek movies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    While Web Therapy is certainly clever and occasionally funny, it lacks both the nerve and verve of "The Comeback."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    I'm slightly more taken with Fox's sweeter absurdedy, Raising Hope, though I still mourn the original title: "Keep Hope Alive."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    There is something still lugubrious and overwrought about True Detective, but there’s also a mesmerizing style to it--it’s imperfect, but well made.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Having watched the serviceable but flat opening episodes of this new season, I think now is as good a time as any to ask if it’s worth going on with The Walking Dead, when all it does is underline its message of futility over and over and over.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    As a drama, The Americans struggles to crack a certain code; the concept is tantalizing, but the follow-through lacks the momentum that gets viewers to commit.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Public Speaking often seems to be trying to relaunch the Fran Lebowitz brand, 25 years past its expiration date. It feels like the kind of movie that old friends would make about an old friend. Which is precisely what it is.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Detailed, but not terribly illuminating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Timbaland produces the original songs that give Empire its real oomph, while the actors try to figure out what kind of characters they’ve agreed to play.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Though deliberately and even artfully paced, Lights Out also feels protracted. It has difficulty establishing momentum in its first few episodes, even with a smattering of intriguing subplots and story lines, and no one character exerts that intangible ability to make us keep watching.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Too Big to Fail has momentum and a certain wonky remove, but is too epic in scope, as Gould's script struggles to match the breadth of the original journalism while the actors try to convince us that they understand all their lines.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    On the whole, Intelligence trafficks in the usual request to suspend your disbelief and then some, but it’s also mildly intriguing--especially in the idea that its macho lead character is also treated as a vulnerable prize who needs to be protected at all costs.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Heroes Reborn, a 13-episode “event series” on NBC, may or may not satisfy fans of the original series (which ended in 2010). Judged on its own, Heroes Reborn doesn’t make an airtight case for its revival. Nevertheless, the first three episodes (including the two-hour Sept. 24 premiere) demonstrate that “Heroes” is/was an often stylish way to tell tales of the super-abled.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    The show suffers from the same banal characteristics of most paint-by-numbers network sitcoms.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Throughout the pilot, you’ll wonder why this couldn’t all be handled in a mediocre two-hour action movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Once you get past the utter silliness of the idea, Reign is kind of a kick.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    It's more of a character sketch than a fully realized story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Janney and Faris seem to have fun, even when the material in the pilot episode is a tad too seedy and even off-puttingly icy. If Mom could dial it down a notch, it would find a better balance between bawdy and snide.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    The tepid laughs here are already in need of a jolt, as Partners cries out for its Karen.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Everyone here, including "Oz's" Eamonn Walker as the battalion chief, is working from the same medium-grim setting, with medium-grim dialogue, which quickly drags the story and action into the still-smoldering ruins of other fire-and-rescue dramas.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Barry takes off so fast that a viewer hardly gets a chance to know him--or care much about where he’s headed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    It takes at least five episodes for Indian Summers to gain a steady momentum, which detracts from its merits, which are seen in its acting, production values and notably adult sensibilities.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Boss works hard to resist the usual "this is how we do things in Chicago" nonsense and dutifully aims for a somewhat "Wire"-esque believability. Yet it can also feel like a burden to watch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    An arty and somewhat entertaining movie with a muddled message.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    There's perhaps the coppiest cop show of the century so far, the soppy and self-satirizing CBS melodrama Blue Bloods, about an entire family--"the Reagans" yet!--involved in the crime biz.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    As Russ, Faxon is a one-note.... but it’s Greer’s performance as Lina (as well as Jenny Slate’s supporting role as Russ’s friend, Jess) that keeps Married alive.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Mad Men is that rare thing that can be as infuriating as it is perfect. I’ve gone back and forth (and hot and cold) on it as much as a critic can; I warmed to it last season but feel a familiar chill this time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    If Rectify was winnowed down to the length of a feature film and shown at a festival, we could better judge whether or not it accomplishes what it set out to do. Delivered this way, as a meandering, weekly TV show (with commercial breaks), it has spread itself too thin.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    No one can survive Surviving Jack’s hollow and formulaic dialogue, which is bursting with jokes that are half-funny at best.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's a handsome study in perfect mediocrity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    With the line between documentary and amusement-park ride now crossed, it's easy for a critic to start noticing Vietnam in HD's other narrative and technical shortcuts with filler and stock footage, splicing in wherever needed the images we have seen before, including those familiar payload-perspective views of bombs being dropped over the hills and villages.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's D'Elia and the other cast members who rescue the show from a wretched Whitney overload.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The Diplomat does its stylish best to make the elder Holbrooke’s biographical details--the clip job, basically--zing with ambitious exploit and achievement.... As the film nears the two-hour mark, the son seems not much more closer to finding the father he seeks.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Once assembled, Mob City has a slick sheen and a sure trigger finger that unleashes a stream of bullets. But the guns here are the kind that go “ho-hum” instead of “bang-bang.”
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's a whole lot of techno-hooey, relying on screenwriter-friendly leaps of logic. Emerson turns out to be a one-note actor, but Caviezel is appealing in a particle-board sort of way.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    For the most part, Girls is still wickedly written and, for some viewers, the best hate-watch around. Yet it too easily runs on fumes from a hipster era (circa 2012) that is already ossifying.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    You'll vaguely remember several shows that went pretty much like this one.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s difficult to escape the show’s plasticky veneer and misplaced exuberance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The pilot episode is stylish and swiftly paced, but that’s all it is, and despite some intriguing plot twists, there’s not a lot of motivation to keep coming back.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    SyFy routinely demonstrates that today’s tricks have gotten too easy, which is why Dominion feels like it is unintentionally telling a separate story of a world in which humanity is held captive by quickie CGI.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It prefers action at points where it could really stand to slow down and build out a slightly more creative story. It's the very definition of a guilty-pleasure series.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's precisely what the title says: just new iterations of the same spit-up and teething jokes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Humans does have that pleasingly antiseptic feeling of euro-cool about it (think of how the Benedict Cumberbatch “Sherlock” series looks, or BBC America’s “Orphan Black”), which can sometimes lure viewers into the belief that they’re watching something classy and sophisticated, when really they’re just snacking on the TV equivalent of rice cakes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    With this vague sensibility and some outdated ideas about the music industry, Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll becomes the very thing Johnny claims to loathe most: It is inauthentic and forgettable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s hard to tell whether Ballers means to make the high life seem as rote and empty as it does (my hunch is that the producers and writers are given more to bouts of envy than sermonizing), but the show and its actors are so much better when zooming in on serious matters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's strange how a show meant to generate excitement and promote thriftiness can leave one with a sense of remorse and shame.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Where the original series had a clear through line and a strong sense of the grief that surrounds murder, the new Broadchurch unsuccessfully juggles several more plots and characters, grafting an older case onto the (surprisingly still ongoing) Latimer case.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    This new, more mild Upstairs Downstairs, which makes its American premiere on PBS on Sunday night, is a three-part epilogue that feels more like an unfinished afterthought.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    For sitcom's premise sake, Kat reluctantly offers Caroline a place to stay, and before you know it we're watching a lukewarm revamp of "The Odd Couple."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    An ambitious--yet disappointingly stiff--staging of the original musical.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    In some parts, Touch is pleasantly moving and even tightly woven, until it becomes too blunt in its purposeful yanking of heartstrings.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    For a while you can sense Hannibal’s noble urge to stick to a long story arc--why does there have to be a new case every episode?--but eventually it gives in to a proven formula.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The set-up is fine and the humor is mostly mac-and-cheese-flavored, but the first few episodes of The Jim Gaffigan Show struggle to nail down the “Modern Family”-like precision that seems to be the desired goal.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The cast is certainly talented enough to overcome We Are Men's shortcomings, if the writing improves.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Impastor’s cleverest lines and riffs on religiosity are somewhat overwhelmed when the show gives in to temptation and becomes a zany caper
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s all done with a cold efficiency and a gloomy, disinterested tone.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s all good, clean fun that is not quite good, not quite clean and not quite fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Future television and movie historians will know us mainly by our enjoyment of stories about sad sacks who further their own misery by trying to impress those around them. It’s a threadbare shtick, but Merchant... has mastered it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Derivative of sci-fi and superhuman dramas we’ve seen plenty of times before, up to and including the slo-mo 'Matrix' bullets flying out of a gun.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Freak Show is certainly telling a weird story, but it’s not all that scary and, worse yet, the characters are already launching into tedious monologues about civil rights for geeks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Only when it has 20 minutes left to live does Killing Lincoln knock it off with the hokey structure and melodrama and let the story itself take charge.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    There’s nothing new going on here, either (people sitting around in a bar insulting one another is as at least as old as “Cheers,” if not much older), but in Undateable’s case, it makes for accidental perfection.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's rare for Burns and Novick to get lost in their own material, but it happens here.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It fixates on the familiar, sullen murkiness similar to recent procedurals (“The Killing” and “Broadchurch,” for example) and adds several more layers of its own artistic yet unfulfilling murk.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s rare to see a show get its style so right and its story so backwards.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    That path [Will Ferrell/Jack Black/Zach Galifianakis school of oddballery] is fairly well trod at this point, as is the "New Girl" vibe Ben and Kate reaches for. Some funny lines still manage to peek through.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Owing more to its overambitious breadth of material than any overt political agenda, The Kennedys necessarily compresses, stretches, distorts and otherwise crams itself into a soap opera that is occasionally elegant and even moving near the end.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's a fine line with Coco. For every funny line he squeezed from his anger Monday night, he missed the point of pathos.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Although Sevigny brings some of her flair for playing stubbornly outré characters to this role, Those Who Kill fails to distinguish itself from “Hannibal,” “The Following” and so much else in TV’s corpse-strewn imagination.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Fashion Star's debut lasts 90 minutes but feels as though it's about five hours.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Frank’s screeds will be familiar to anyone who has caught Burr’s superior stand-up act, but something gets lost when bringing that voice and sensibility over to a scripted, animated format. F Is for Family spends too much time working itself up to a full boil--which arrives only in the last episode-and-a-half.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The show is so tight--maybe too tight--that it starts to choke on its own power-tie premise in the first three episodes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The exteriors overplay Portland’s constant gloomy rain (it’s the wettest crime show since “The Killing”), but a couple more episodes might offer a ray of hope as the writers start to find ways to turn Backstrom into a person you’d want to spend an hour with each week.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Both shows ["Storage Wars" and Discovery's Gold Rush: Alaska] also have their moments of absorbing drama and distasteful levels of bullheadedness, set against an American backdrop that once again seems mere steps away from the full-on, Cormac McCarthy-style apocalypse.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    From the writing to the performances to some overly artistic visuals and camera cuts, the first episode could not be more crammed with self-seriousness if it tried.... Some strong performances peek through anyhow, especially from Manhattan’s star, John Benjamin Hickey.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    As lovingly written and organized as it is, the viewer must divide his or her time picking up on different scenarios and moods, caught between rather ho-hum murder cases and this other, more beguiling attempt to craft a show that is about the nature of loss and grief.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Schumer’s sharpness comes through best in such moments, when she’s in stand-up mode and taking significant risks beyond the genre’s still-customary boundary lines of gender.... Meanwhile, her sketches and woman-on-the-street interviews with passersby feel burdened with the task of pleasing a male audience (while enlightening them a scoch).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Detroit 1-8-7 comes across, despite the strong performances, as wan and halfhearted. Dividing each episode into two cases, and labeling them onscreen (as Tuesday night: "Pharmacy Double" and "Bullet Train") may be convenient, but it seems part of an especially unimaginative approach.
    • Washington Post
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Dice is mostly a warmed-over attempt to ape Larry David’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” with just a dose of the existential despair seen in Louis C.K.’s “Louie.”
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The show has a sincerity about its silliness and light spookiness; for a moment there, it’s almost as if 'True Blood' tried to conceive a demon baby with 'Bunheads.'
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A ribald but bumpy road-trip comedy that wants to be more than just a slapstick retread of “National Lampoon’s Vacation” (which already got a retread last year in theaters). But after several episodes, the show can’t quite find its way.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The title tells you all you need to know.... The rest is pretty much gumbo from a can.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A conceptually smart but only moderately funny comedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Robust but repetitive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A watered-down and considerably less meaningful iteration of the 2002 Steven Spielberg science-fiction movie
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Whatever hopes "Arrested Development" fans may have held for a new Will Arnett series begin to dissipate by Episode 2--even with another "Development" funnyman, David Cross, on board as Emily's annoying eco-terrorist boyfriend. This tiny horsey has no giddyap, but there's still a chuckle or two.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    You'll blow a gasket if you watch this show with any trace of superiority or outrage. Instead, bafflement is a good resting spot; a guilty-pleasure glee works even better.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Halt and Catch Fire suffers from a common case of style over substance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Both shows [Storage Wars and Discovery's "Gold Rush: Alaska"] also have their moments of absorbing drama and distasteful levels of bullheadedness, set against an American backdrop that once again seems mere steps away from the full-on, Cormac McCarthy-style apocalypse.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The first three episodes are all hints and shadows and squandered time, while the show’s most intriguing context and premise--life in a forgotten and neglected tribe--gets lost in all the meandering.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Produced and directed by Sheila Canavan and Michael Chandler, Compared to What? spends too much of its 1 1/2 hours cementing Frank’s legacy as one of the last lawmakers on the Hill who understood the art of compromise.... The film is too admiring of its subject. Compared to What? is more entertaining (and revealing) in a present tense, capturing Frank as an inveterate schlub septuagenarian.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Selfie’s addiction to topical techie satire tends to get in the way of Gillan and Cho’s attempts to convey an unlikely chemistry that might help the show rise above a concept that already feels like yesterday’s clicks.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Downton Abbey lacks surprise and is stretched precariously thin, a house full of fascinating people with not nearly enough to do, all caught in a loop of weak storylines that circle round but never fully propel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The special isn’t as funny or inventive as one might hope. The set-up is cheesily self-aware.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Red Oaks is no better or worse than its peers in this genre; certainly it will trigger fond and awkward memories for those who lived it or something like it, but the pilot episode released earlier this year doesn’t make a case that these feelings have much thematic potential beyond the usual cliches.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    By the second hour (both of Monday’s episodes adhere to the minute-by-minute chronology; the fast-forwarding will happen later), it’s clear that Live Another Day is not much interested in broadening the show’s scope, feeling or characters. It does, however, have an abiding interest in the latest news about spying, vis-a-vis its own version of notorious document-leaker Edward Snowden: Chloe O’Brian.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Sometimes it’s fun to get utterly lost in a drama like this; sometimes it’s better to turn around and keep driving.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s refreshing to see NBC bring out a comedy that values subtlety over slapstick, but the situations and dialogue here are just a little too subtle to draw viewers in.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A sometimes sharp but painfully predictable Constantine premieres Friday night.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    There are moments in which the acting and the dialogue in A.D. achieve a quiet and entirely believable beauty, suitable for devout and secular audiences. But as soon as I say that, here comes the “Constantine”-esque angel riding the blazing meteor down to the tomb in the middle of the night for the rolling away of the big, round stone. The flashiness is reminiscent of cheesy megachurch passion plays.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Despite some initial problems with pace and a bland idea of suspense, The Last Ship is at least a break from all the detective and lawyer shows that characterize cable TV’s long summers.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Formulaic but fashionable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Becoming Chaz is one thing--and it's occasionally fascinating to watch--but being Chaz gets old pretty fast.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Tveit is kind of an underwhelming Officer Opie here, while Sunjata brings a menacingly ambivalent character to life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    So far, several story lines of small-town secrets and drama have fanned out and fizzled, making it hard to tell if “Bates Motel” wants to be compellingly chilling or just tediously unnerving.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    I Am Cait is, on some level, the most respectful melding of television’s notion of cinema verite and Hollywood’s highest form of top-notch, controlled publicity. Rarely could a show be so completely about the management of reactions.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Blunt Talk is a muddled but sometimes endearingly dirty comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Even with its ample servings of va-va-boom, a lot of edgy potential is wasted in Nikita, the CW's retinkering of the much-tinkered-with story of the sexy assassin who is betrayed and hunted by "the Division," the top-secret government agency that trained her.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Snail-paced and difficult to relate to, Parade’s End feels twice as long as its total running time. And yet it’s an exquisite and thoughtful sort of slog, with sound British pedigree and bone structure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Dreyfuss gives a performance that is merely serviceable rather than memorable, while Danner copes with a version of Ruth Madoff that seems regrettably underwritten and underexplored. (Same goes for the sons.) The story is still quite a corker, though--certainly enough to fill four-ish hours of prime-time commercial television, filled with sadness and schadenfreude.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    A laughably over-serious pilot episode makes it difficult to take Zoo on its own terms.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    An ambitious but ultimately weak attempt to set an ensemble drama inside Hugh Hefner's hallowed, smoke-filled nightclub of early 1960s Chicago.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    Nothing about Sean Saves the World is off-putting, but not much about it is welcoming either.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    A new but forgettable TV treatment for an old story, with results that look very "CW."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    The cast is adequately charming (if completely cliche), and the show is perky and occasionally sharp, but “A to Z” is also a prime example of the sort of perfectly acceptable yet thoroughly mediocre fall TV show that’s all too easy to ignore.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    All of this occurs against the backdrop of the make-believe New York of the mind and is aimed mainly at simple folk who understand romance only through the broad strokes of gender stereotypes. They’re both adorable enough that you’ll feel just the slightest twinge of remorse as you kick them to the curb.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    Although there are a few snarky laughs in the pilot, they can’t compete with the uncomfortable feeling that Mulaney, bless his heart, isn’t ready for prime time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    At times Black Sails feels like it wants to be taken seriously as a complicated, premium cable drama (a la “Game of Thrones”). At other times, it feels more like cheesier, more niche material (a la “Spartacus”).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    The pilot is woefully lacking the nuance and inventive wit that would help make The Mysteries of Laura more worthy of [Messing's] talents.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    The whole show runs medium-medium, with humor plainer than Dr. Ken’s khakis.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    The show vacillates between hokey and clever as it mines the Brothers Grimm for contemporary analogues.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Despite its meandering soapiness, there are passing moments of enjoyable "Downton"-like momentum wherein a viewer can eventually let go of the Cameron version (and "A Night to Remember" and the many, many documentaries in cable rotation) and simply enjoy the tilt.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The old clips are still a hoot, but there's a limit to how much compressed air a viewer can take, listening to a bunch of old men talk about how funny their friend was.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The film is a sturdy but ultimately stifled exercise in the most polite methods of interrogation--to which its subject is entirely immovable and not prepared to surrender anything, even a smile.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    What Pelosi has here is the start of a more meaningful film about second chances and forgiveness, but what she ends up with looks more like a greeting card.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    A lushly produced but ultimately unthrilling dramatic miniseries version of the story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Though handsomely assembled from the spare parts of a dozen other evil-twin stories that came before it, Ringer quickly downgrades itself to a fairly ho-hum night soap.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The network has brought back Hart and Lawrence, who are both 34 (whoa!), in a sitcom called Melissa & Joey, premiering Tuesday night, which isn't half-bad. You could do worse--say, "Hot in Cleveland."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Yet another dystopian vision with Steven Spielberg's brand name affixed to it (as executive producer), this time as a cheap-looking but occasionally intriguing sci-fi social study called Falling Skies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    GSN's new game show, The American Bible Challenge, is just as dull as it sounds, like mandatory fun time at Sunday school.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Banshee has the audacity to behave as though its bloody violence, implausible set-up and studied ugliness is somehow vanguard television. In fact, it's just more of the same.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The always-appreciable Dana Delany does her level best to lift Body of Proof, a paint-by-numbers morgue drama premiering Tuesday night on ABC, from its stale premise and up to the level of a beautifully-flawed-character study, something more akin to Julianna Margulies's legal procedural, "The Good Wife."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The Brink is a little too stale and disorganized to act as the “Veep” of foreign diplomacy, but it does provoke a chuckle here and there.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There's barely a show here at all. Reed Between the Lines is instead a totemic analogy, bemoaning in sitcom form the lack of well-adjusted black families living in upper-middle-class splendor on network TV.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Here it is, uncooked at the center.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The dialogue is flatter than usual and, for all the techie attempts at whiz-bang-pow, the stories are facile. Arquette’s not the only one smart-phoning it in here; everyone on CSI: Cyber has the look of someone who’s in it for the direct deposit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Countdown has transported itself from MSNBC to Current without major incident or much innovation.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Same Name prefers the usual bunk of the genre, smoothing over significant matters of a class chasm that is an everyday reality for all Americans with dreamy ideas of how we're all not really so different from one another.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Unsupervised doesn't explore emotional story threads. It's mainly a Beavis and Butt-head echo.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There's a bit of banter well-delivered and some artful action, yet Breakout Kings lacks a certain vim and chemistry required for a real breakout series.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There’s a chuckle here and a chuckle there, but it’s impossible to escape the feeling that you’ve just been forwarded a stale Internet meme from your dad.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    McKellen and Jacobi seem to have a fun time slinging the insults, but before long, the show starts repeating itself, almost as if it’s going senile right before our eyes.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Dig bears the telltale scars of hack TV assembly--a little of this, a little of that, all of it meant to tie together eventually for the viewer who can endure all the hammy setup and self-seriousness (and stale ideas) seen in the first few episodes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Both Restaurant and "Millionaire" stir similar pots of self-pride, entrepreneurship and the psychic reward of sharing one's good fortune. But because the medium is television--reality television--each show collapses under the pressure of showing off its sense of nobility and higher purpose.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Almost everything about Life's Too Short somehow echoes pieces of all of Gervais's previous TV work, which makes this show seem particularly limp.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It’s as if someone looked up instructions for making a period cable TV drama and followed them to the letter--and wound up with something like a “Boardwalk Empire”-style story arc set in an old-timey “E.R.,” only with a much weaker pulse.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Does Someone Have to Go? provides little in the way of a grand statement or meaningful takeaway.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It's still pretty blah and rarely rises above a relative's chatty slide show of vacation pictures.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Monday Mornings, TNT’s new hospital drama from David E. Kelley, takes what might have been a fresh angle and overdoses it with the usual sappy storylines and cheap, melodramatic editing style.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Teen Wolf bounds so wildly between its main plot points that I began to wonder if my press copy of the show had skipped some scenes or if they'd been assembled out of order.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There's no time for anthropology, psychology or cultural criticism. Whisker Wars, it seems, is no different from those shows about extreme couponers or the woman who eats the stuffing out of sofa cushions.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It is filled with weak attempts at sketch comedy, resulting in a few funny moments here and there, but not enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Hemingway & Gellhorn is overly enamored with its ridiculous sense of sweep.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Both "Restaurant" and Millionaire stir similar pots of self-pride, entrepreneurship and the psychic reward of sharing one's good fortune. But because the medium is television--reality television--each show collapses under the pressure of showing off its sense of nobility and higher purpose.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Whatever triumphant feeling it initially evokes, Weed Wars drags as the lackadaisical attitudes of both the suppliers and the customers begin to grate on a viewer's nerves.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It’s a lot less fun now; when watching these new episodes, I found it impossible to complete any sentence along the lines of “I hope [blank] happens to [blank],” not counting my hope that poor Adam (Hannah’s increasingly complex boyfriend, played by Adam Driver, who now provides the show’s only gravitational pull) will come to his senses and flee.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Phil Spector is a wordy and unappealingly clinical character sketch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Despite an honest attempt at a fresh concoction, the results taste watered-down.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Comic Book Men's idle chit-chat about comics comes off as remedial and boring.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Skins is so determined to relate to hardened kids--without sermon, theme or context--that it accidentally discovers a new frontier in phoniness and filth. Even if I could warp time and watch it as my teenaged self, I'm pretty sure I would have been bored by it back then, too--even with all the sex.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    In its overall sweep and style, Into the Badlands struggles to find a bigger idea or compelling narrative that could really draw a crowd and keep it entertained.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The writing is merely serviceable; the acting is uninspired; the scary stuff comes off as silly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There's something blandly nutrition-less and sugary about Mike & Molly, CBS's new Hostess Twinkie of a Monday night sitcom.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Try as I might, Mad Men fails to resonate, settle in, tell me something. It can no longer get out of its own way so as to allow its multiple story lines to experience actual forward momentum. (Only the calendar does that.)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Although it has some nice moves and the occasional tense moment, the show's visual allure quickly leads to aggravation.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Nothing in Anger Management is all bad, but not much of it is better than half-good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Every setback endured by Vince and his entourage (box-office bombs; girl trouble) is smoothed over by the arrival of six-figure paychecks and the bromantic ideal. It's pretty to look at, but stagnant all the same.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    By episode six, Flaked throws a real curve that’s nearly worth seeing through to the end, as Arnett’s performance deepens and the show becomes something more than just an excuse to loaf. The problem is getting there.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The show dawdles in a long and empty corridor that separates edgier, topical character studies such as Amazon’s brilliant “Transparent” from a traditional comedy series such as “Friends.”
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Morose aesthetics aside, it also feels as if Gobert and company are pawing around in the dark, looking for a way to extend The Returned and not coming up with anything other than to further puzzle the viewer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    In the first four episodes, there isn't anyone or anything to root for, other than history's corrective hand.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Mercy Street’s problem is an ineffable lack of cohesion and oomph. The blood is spilling, but the heart’s not pumping.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    As revealed by the first four episodes of the second season, even a tweaked Newsroom is a still pretty much a bore.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    I think its jokes are predictable and its '60s-era styling is tired.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Further criticism would be like taking a Slurpee to task for tasting too sweet. And in spite of my pasty self, there’s something I liked about all the relentless mugging and frugging.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Morgan's first show turned out to be a fawning and completely unnecessary interview with a successful businesswoman named Oprah Winfrey.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Even people with Romney stickers still clinging to their bumpers will fidget through the stultifying middle chunk of director Greg Whiteley’s sympathetically observant but journalistically incurious Mitt, the product of six years of friendly, unfettered access to Romney and his family.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Every creature and person is a threat to Alice and vice versa. Characters like the rabbit and knave are uppity and untrustworthy; they steal and lie. There are no ready-made friendships here like there are in, say, Oz. As soon as you get there, you feel like you’re ready to leave.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Every scene in School Pride feels like the seventh or 10th take and too contrived, even by the low standards of reality TV....I will say that School Pride seems less manipulative and showy than its forebears.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Even when the pacing and writing and performances seem to line up, some intangible quality fails to quite hit the spot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Although it is 90 minutes long, it feels much longer, and the truly smart laughs are few.

Top Trailers