For 684 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Frozen Planet: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Hart of Dixie: Season 1
Score distribution:
684 tv reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Orphan Black has apparently just scraped the surface--not only with the overall narrative arc but with the depth of character development in each of the clones that Maslany plays.... [However] It is chewing so voraciously through its story lines--at such a rapid pace--that it often verges on collapse.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Ostensibly an objective inquiry into the tragedy, the film is perhaps better interpreted as a study in the infinite and even seemingly inappropriate ways that people experience profound grief.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Even with the cross-pond cultural differences, young adults who are perennially baffled by their aging boomer parents will feel right at home here.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    A plainly told, tenderly acted and well-intentioned two-hour movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Mad Men is fading away as beautifully--even indifferently--as one would expect.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Empire’s one and only problem remains the ethical hollowness of its characters--even the “good” ones are prone to cruelty. Co-creators Lee Daniels and Danny Strong and their crew either can’t locate or do not wish to introduce an underlying moral tone to this story. That’s part of what makes it so rich and watchable, but it also leaves viewers used and abused.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The fun here comes without that extra layer of philosophical fanaticism. In that sense, The Strain is an enjoyable (and sufficiently sicko) episodic diversion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The new series is compelling in its own way, but it will take a while to see how it congeals. Or, more aptly, if it coagulates.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Fallon complies, respectfully and skillfully, with The Tonight Show's apparently inviolable formats (the opening monologue of jokes; the fact that at least part of the show must be conducted from his desk) as a bridge to the more goofy and innovative sketch comedy he prefers. He keeps looking for ways to delight us, surprise us. It can so easily stray into irritation--and the yawning brought on by all the fawning--but you can’t really fault the guy for trying to send people to bed happy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show seems markedly improved from its earlier efforts and somehow more confident in its writing and sense of nuance. It's also funnier.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show misses its mark--but not by much and not in any objectionable way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Go On moves quite breezily--much like an NBC-flavored take on premium cable dramadies such as "The Big C" and "Enlightened." It's not as good as either of those, but it has the same happy-sad aura, with just a dash of "Community"-like absurdity to keep the speed limit up.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Overall, Late Show seems to be in good hands. If it was too busy, it was a busy-ness from the heart.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Henderson gives a lunky, forgettable performance, coming nowhere near anyone's idea of a stronger, meaner version of J.R. Thanks to the rest of its ensemble, however, the new Dallas gains some traction and kicks up a little dust.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Foster makes for an energetic and engaging lead, never missing a beat; the rest of the cast is equally snappy-snippy, thanks to scripts and story lines that keep everyone prancing along like trained poodles.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    This is by no means the first Comedy Central show about a guy comedian in Hollywood engaged in convenient pseudo-sketches about the rain clouds hanging over him. But it’s the first one in a long time that feels like it has something real to say.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    It’s a well-meaning, good-humored, hospitable hour of television, reminiscent of the nascent days of cable reality shows in the early 2000s, before everyone figured out that ratings success meant being nasty, famous and selfish.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    While it's not perfect, Bunheads is a happy find, a ray of authenticity on a summer TV schedule filled with so much artificial light.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Just a dose of the show leads to sweaty palms and heightened anticipation--always a good sign. It's funny how little it takes: Everything about the way Million Dollar Money Drop is built relies on one modern game-show trope after another.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    If it’s even partly a put-on, Seduced and Abandoned is nevertheless a fun, larky travel essay and commentary on the film biz, an exquisite wallow in the most rarefied sort of first-world problems.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show makes an admirable effort at transcending gayness without compromising it. Groff is fine but not fascinating as the naive yet manipulative Patrick, and Alvarez gives Agustin a certain bohemian flair. The real standout--and best-realized character so far--is Bartlett’s Dom. Actually, the more I think about it, the show’s real standout is San Francisco itself.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    It’s good to know there’s something more to Baskets than a creep in greasepaint. The delicious misery here is evenly spread.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    All of which is to say that even for the most open minds, Game of Thrones can be a big stein of groggy slog. On the plus side, the first six episodes are impressively free of sorcery and special effects, and instead rely on the stuff of any deeply dark HBO epic: corruption, deceit, illicit sex (incest in this case), unflinchingly gory violence, and a willingness to kill off a prominent character or two in the service of plot.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    National Geographic Channel’s sullen but entertaining two-night miniseries Saints & Strangers earnestly underlines our most American principle, telling a warts-and-all story of that hodgepodge of passengers on the rickety English ship known as the Mayflower.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Shows like those lean more toward seriousness and away from the colorfully ridiculous old comic books. Although this often strikes non-fanboys and non-fangirls as woefully atonal, it mostly works here, but it would be nice if No Ordinary Family had more humor about it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Everything that’s excellent about The Normal Heart--including compelling performances from its stars, Mark Ruffalo and Julia Roberts, with an especially strong turn from "White Collar’s" Matt Bomer--is also merely just fine; very good but not great; a tear-jerker but not a bawler; and probably beyond reproach.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Every detail has been attended to, every format and traditional segue honored; there is absolutely nothing to quibble over with the show's tone and pace. Which is, itself, a quibble.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Tennant is once again terrific at juggling a lot of emotions from one moment to the next. The supporting cast is also sufficiently fine, including a steely performance from Sophie Okonedo.... Plodding on too far, The Escape Artist becomes a revenge story. And yet, for the ineffably eurocentric reasons I was describing earlier, you keep watching and waiting for the surprise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    With an efficient and alternately clumsy and eloquent screenplay by Walon Green, Killing Jesus does not vary much from the Via Dolorosa. As a result, the lavish NatGeo treatment works a lot better than it did on the channel’s adaptations of O’Reilly’s earlier books, “Killing Lincoln” and “Killing Kennedy.”
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    After a skittery and slightly tedious start, which is heavy on Carter’s need to keep infusing Mulder and Scully’s world with a convoluted master theory, The X-Files settles in and starts to relocate some of its creepy vibe and playfulness.

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