For 948 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J. Hoberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Police, Adjective
Lowest review score: 0 A Hole in My Heart
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 74 out of 948
948 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 J. Hoberman
    Mildly tasteless (natürlich), if not exactly uproarious.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    May not be the movie of the year, but it is a seasonal gift to us all. Sweet and funny, doggedly oddball if bordering precious.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 J. Hoberman
    Iranian director Jafar Panahi's Crimson Gold is an anti-blockbuster--a deceptively modest undertaking that brilliantly combines unpretentious humanism and impeccable formal values.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    Up and Down is not exactly the toughest movie on the block, but especially compared to most American comedies, it conveys a sense of scrofulous rue.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    Neither a debacle nor a bore, The Departed works but only up to a point, and never emotionally--even if the director does contrive to supply his version of a happy ending.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    Go
    A showy exercise in nervous grit, Go never strays too far from a sense of itself as stunt.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    Any investigation into Hollywood inevitably mutates into a noir.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A movie of elegant understatement and considerable formal intelligence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    Hand it to Lawrence and Christian. Jindabyne is a soberly, if sluggishly, crafted movie in which the bitterness never stops.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 J. Hoberman
    Playing the young Coleman with the requisite intelligence and ambiguity, Wentworth Miller contributes the sole viable characterization.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    In a sense, Millennium Mambo is a mildly prurient portrait of Shu moving, drinking, smoking, and changing clothes -- it's analogous to one of Andy Warhol's Edie Sedgwick films, but without the existential drama. Who really cares what costume this poor girl will wear to all tomorrow's parties?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    An intelligent, viscerally intellectual exercise in ensemble acting and associative montage, enlivened with some terrific visual and dramatic ideas.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    As directed by Gidi Dar, Ushpizin has a disarming folk quality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    Enigmatic from the get-go, The Fall of Otrar builds to a series of spectacular battle scenes, but the mood is never less than sardonic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    Fond, funny documentary.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    A notably confident and achieved debut.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    The Decay of Fiction is less a narrative than a monument. In its abstract movie-ness, this 74-minute carnival of souls exudes a wistful longing to connect, not so much with Hollywood history as with the history of that history.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    More affecting than affected.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 J. Hoberman
    The Dreamers is bad, but unlike the similarly camped-up "Little Buddha" or "Stealing Beauty," it's not exactly boring.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 J. Hoberman
    Summer sequelitis is upon us, but the season is unlikely to bring anything more remarkable than Richard Linklater's sweet, smart, and deeply romantic Before Sunset.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    Single-minded, sometimes harrowing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    The climactic Christmas Day dinner of dreadful retribution is a terrifying prospect, but for anyone with a yen for our great lost genre, it's also some sort of gift.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Complex, superbly rendered, and wildly eccentric anime-even by Miyazaki's own standards.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Enriches a deceptively anecdotal plot with a combination of observational camerawork, strong narrative rhythms, and deft characterization.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    Inside Man certainly functions as a genre film, but the backbeat of inane banter and schoolyard trash-talking serves to promote an infectious sense of levity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 J. Hoberman
    High-powered and gory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 J. Hoberman
    A more materialist (and successful) ensemble film than the mystical "Babel," in that everyone is connected through the same economic system, Fast Food Nation is exotic for being a movie about work.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 10 J. Hoberman
    From the end to the beginning--or is it from the inadvertently ridiculous to the would-be sublime?--Noé's stunt is an exploitation movie with a gimmick, not to mention a vacuous philosophy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    The spectacle of pretty people floating languidly across the screen notwithstanding, Laurel Canyon is short on conviction and long on contrivance. McDormand, however, has a ball.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 J. Hoberman
    Deb Ellis and Denis Mueller's fond portrait, less documentary than infomercial, is unrelentingly and in the end self-defeatingly positive--albeit effective in showcasing Zinn's charismatic personality.

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