Jaime N. Christley

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For 38 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jaime N. Christley's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Deep End (1970)
Lowest review score: 0 Wrath of the Titans
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 38
  2. Negative: 10 out of 38
38 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Jaime N. Christley
    Deep End is as soaked in pheromones and nervous electricity as Mike, but he's as much a product of the world of desire that surrounds him as one of its participants, and when the end finally comes, there's only a reprise of earlier dream imagery to suggest that there was anything other than a spasmodic, hormonal twitch involved in bringing about its conclusion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jaime N. Christley
    The lightning in the film’s bottle isn’t some generic feel-good humanism, but a complicated one, fighting for its own existence, sometimes angry, sometimes despondent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    The geometry of human relationships is the main theme of Hong Sang-soo's The Day He Arrives.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    After a few turns in the modest narrative, an unlikely sense of structural resilience begins to emerge.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    Regarding Michel Piccoli's Max, Claude Sautet's film resists judgment, neither condoning nor signposting the despicable nature of his choices.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    At this point in the franchise, Anderson is content to alight the saga on a perpetual rewind loop, ever-ending, ever-rebooting, all subsidized by his nonpareil compositional sense.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    Triumphs when David Chase's empowerment as a kind of autobiographical historian is balanced with the thrill of submersing the viewer in the tidal pool of his memories
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    The film turns what at first seemingly appears as Kodak moments into a study of a soul in transition.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Jaime N. Christley
    Metropolitan celebrates and mourns the specific character of a place and time, youthful associations and crushes, a toolkit of values, even if those values are not exactly shared by, say, housewives in Duluth and auto mechanics in Albuquerque.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    Like many almost-great comedies, 21 Jump Street is frontloaded with the best go-for-broke gags and lines.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    After what seems like an eternity of inanity and incompetence in the realm of Cats & Dogs and Squeakquels, the Farrelly brothers' direction is downright classical.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    In spite of its lazy, cookie-cutter screenplay, simple narrative mechanics are only dutifully observed to the extent that they step aside to make way for numerous flights of madness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    Glides from a mildly off-putting opening across several scenes that waver between sitcom superficiality and sudden, unexpected gusts of feeling, ultimately ending on a note of perfectly judged emotional ambivalence.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    It's a final film in the specific sense of Raúl Ruiz designing the larger part of it around a metaphorical contemplation of his own, imminent demise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    The essayistic remembrances provide the filmmakers with a brilliant exit strategy when the noir business has nowhere to go but in circles.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    In order to make the walk, and in order for it to matter to him, Philippe Petit has to comprehend it as real and impossible. Zemeckis teaches us the same lesson.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jaime N. Christley
    The premise of the film is simple, but it's a simplicity that can only attract complications, as simple plans are apt to do, in an atmosphere of foreboding and the macabre.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Jaime N. Christley
    This mostly no-nonsense, floor-by-floor ass-kicking panorama is admirably humble.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Jaime N. Christley
    The Cabin in the Woods, regardless of its many genealogical links to prior Whedon creations, is an ideal Hollywood film in the Age of Pixar: spectacle for spectacle's sake, but infiltrated by intelligent commentary and an atmosphere of generosity and inclusion.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Jaime N. Christley
    While The Avengers exhibits exemplary craftsmanship, Joss Whedon hasn't made a great film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Jaime N. Christley
    One successful set piece in 135 minutes, and it involves very little running, no parkour, and no genetically enhanced superheroes from clandestine government projects.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Jaime N. Christley
    Joy
    David O. Russell proposes that there may be no real barrier between the caustic worldview he wears and the sense of childlike wonder he sells.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jaime N. Christley
    What ultimately hobbles War Horse is a two-pronged attack, with Spielberg's soft-sell producing an unfortunately dramatic flatness in almost every scene, while an 11th-hour scramble for picture-book catharsis doesn't seem to work either.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jaime N. Christley
    Madeleine Olnek has a limited repertoire of jokes, so it's fortunate that the film, at 76 minutes, is fairly amusing, even if it's never quite laugh-out-loud funny.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jaime N. Christley
    It's only natural that Abel Ferrara's vision of the end of the world should take corporeal form as a quasi-autobiographical hangout movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jaime N. Christley
    As funny and batshit insane as the movie often is, the fact that 22 Jump Street knows it's a tiresome sequel doesn't save it from being a tiresome sequel, even as Lord and Miller struggle to conceal the bitter pill of convention in the sweet tapioca pudding of wall-to-wall jokes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jaime N. Christley
    One may feel dissatisfied by the 11th-hour turn toward lyrical fatalism, and mildly insulted by the presumptuous attitude it seems to choose as it sends us on our way.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jaime N. Christley
    The film goes in for the idea of texture and tics and human behavior, but there's no conviction, and no real push for eccentricity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Jaime N. Christley
    There's something about these films, something about the working-over these songs suffer--a wrongness that's intangible but inescapable, like the unseen menace of a bad dream.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Jaime N. Christley
    The script is a hot mess of the highest order, taking some of the stalest chestnuts in the long, venerated legacy of the framed-cop-trying-to-clear-his-name genre and somehow f---ing it up, in scene after scene after scene.

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