For 143 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Miller's Crossing
Lowest review score: 0 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 85 out of 143
  2. Negative: 36 out of 143
143 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    The relationship between man and beast develops slowly and mystically - the island interlude, utterly without dialogue, lasts 50 minutes, and is one of the most sustained, lyrical, rapturous sequences in the history of motion pictures, a visual symphony whose beauty cannot be oversold. [15 Mar 1980]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    May be the best war movie ever made...Different is Kubrick's artistry and control, and his almost perverse, but philosophically progressive, refusal to impart to chaos a coherent narrative contour.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    Kramer vs. Kramer is one of the most sensitive and least judgmental film about relationships ever made in the United States.... One of the important films. [15 Dec 1979]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    Terms of Endearment is the rare commercial picture that sets audiences to laughing hysterically and crying unashamedly, sometimes within consecutive seconds, and then shoos them out of the theatre in contented emotional exhaustion. [23 Nov 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    No so-called serious gangster film has ever been more fun, or less dangerous, or more intrinsically feminist, than GoodFellas. Even "I Married the Mob" was scarier.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    Cinema Paradiso converts you to the credo that art can indeed be holy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    David Cronenberg's gelid masterpiece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    May be less than the sum of its parts, but its parts are more impressive than most other wholes around.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    Estimates of the movie's costs range between $35-and $70-million; whatever the price, it was not too much to pay. As gods go, Superman is one of the godliest; his movie is one of the best.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    Beyond Thunderdome is a masterfully directed fantasy, convincing down to the smallest detail in its vision of an alternate existence, and it has gone beyond the relentless sadomasochism of The Road Warrior; Max has now taken up with children, and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome is suitable for them. [9 July 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    A classic... Edward Scissorhands is a sharp salute to the oddball in all of us.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    A masterpiece, but of a unique kind... A gorgeously filmed, supremely well-acted, intricately written film noir about now.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    Kurt Russell has never seemed more clever, Mel Gibson more vulnerable nor Michelle Pfeiffer more goddess-like. Once upon a time, before the pictures got small and the hills were obscured by smog, the Hollywood sign read: "Hollywoodland." That was back when Tequila Sunrise, an intelligent, escapist epic for adults, wouldn't have seemed the anomaly it seems today. [2 Dec 1988, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Scott
    The Witches of Eastwick is an uproarious and entirely successful attempt to examine the differences between the sexes by couching the examination in mythological terms. [12 June 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Scorsese and Schrader have made a courageous film that people of all religions or no religion should be able to watch with identical fascination. [10 Aug 1988. pg. C.4]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Marshall elicits performances from Williams and De Niro that are exceptional. Awakenings is a small, simple movie about a large, complex issue, the waste of human opportunity. [19 Dec 1990, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Demme not only gives the script's nuttiness its due, he adds to it by filling the frame in virtually every scene with silliness - a motorcycle- riding dog, a harpsichordist, a man wearing a T-shirt that reads, "I don't love you since you ate my dog." [7 Nov 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Witness is satisfying on so many levels it stands with "Cabaret" and "The Godfather II" as an example of how a director in love with his medium can redeem its mainstream cliches. [07 Feb 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    A serious and funny and subtle work - a work of art - that was easy to confuse with exploitation teeny-bopper quickies because it did what the quickies had tried to do. But Diner did it right. [22 Apr 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Raiders of the Lost Ark (at the Eglinton) is a cinematic roller-coaster, thrilling and frightening in equal measure, a heart-pounding slide down greased lightning. [12 June 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    A non-stop, shoestring trip with more adventures and a helluva lot more smarts than you'll find in most American movies...All in all, there's more plain fun to be had here in 10 minutes than in a whole hour on the road with that jerk Indiana Jones.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Once you overlook the laborious contrivance of Jerry's background, Down and Out in Beverly Hills is a sharp, sweet comedy of affluent manners. [31 Jan 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The deployment of the hardware may be extraordinary, but it doesn't overshadow the human dimension of this summer sequel. [4 July 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    This happy daydream contains Coppola's most assured work since "Apocalypse Now;" save for its modesty, it is in no way inferior to his masterpiece, "The Godfather" Saga. [12 Aug 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The treatment of the Sioux is not only sympathetic, it's ethnographically exact. Neither Noble Savages nor Red Injuns, the natives in Dances With Wolves are differentiated human beings about to undergo cultural genocide.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The most amazing thing about this amazing movie may be that in the end it communicates the large uncertainties and small hopes of a twisted, inarticulate adolescent boy perfectly, and wordlessly. [14 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    If everyone in One False Move keeps making mistakes, there are no false moves from the technicians or actors; the only flaw is the slight taint of convenience that attends the plotting of so many contemporary thrillers. But the taint is superficial - it's eventually overwhelmed by the smell of corruption, the odour of pain, and the stench of hopelessness. [4 Sept 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Days of Heaven is so unapologetically beautiful, so calculatingly gorgeous, it is certain to arouse resentment in the minds of those who find visual hedonism a sin in movies, and to arouse suspicion, if not outrage, in those who require that movies have heart. [22 Sept. 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Ragtime itself twinkles with delight - perhaps only an immigrant, and a recent one, could have made this film, which looks squarely at the social problems gnawing at North America but which finds, within them and without them, cause for hope. [20 Nov 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Never before has Allen been able to integrate comedy and pathos as deftly as he does in Manhattan. [28 Apr 1979, p. 17]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Mesmerizing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    A loopy, loving nine innings full of comic curve balls, emotional home-runs and euphoric, summertime music.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Hair is entertaining - even fabulously entertaining - because it is so strange, so young, so innocent, so beneficent and adolescent, so lovable and so loving; it is entertaining because it is - all of it is - so impossible, so remote, so inconceivable in any place anywhere outside of a Hollywood musical. [28 Mar 1979]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The virtue of Midnight Run is not that it does anything new; the virtue is that it does everything old so well.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The intensity of the film verges on the intolerable.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, is certainly indebted to the plastic and neon schlock of Hollywood director Frank Tashlin, but the farcical epic of actress Pepa Marcos is closer in innovative energy to the transformations of Fassbinder than to the recycling of Spielberg and De Palma. [20 Jan 1989, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Inoffensive in its simplicity; its high, if naive, spirits send viewers out into the all too real streets clothed in the glow of a fantasy well-spun.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The Fly is a mass-market, horror- film masterpiece that is also a work of art; it is the very movie the timorous feared "Aliens" would be - a gruesome, disturbing, fundamentally uncompromising shocker that accesses the subconscious. [15 Aug 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    It's an unpredictable, mesmerizing journey nearly every shady second of the way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The Doors is excessive, unsubtle, emotionally brutal and stylistically sadistic, but that's exactly right for the dark side of the sixties Morrison and his band embodied. [01 Mar 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The intelligence and wit of this glass-slipper heart-of-gold fantasy are shocking.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Missing from Married to the Mob, written by Barry Strugatz and Mark R. Burns, is the freewheeling structure, but everything else that makes Demme one of the friendliest of major U.S. directors is in glorious evidence. [19 Aug 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    A quick and clever thriller as nasty as a piece of shrapnel snapping the sound barrier, 48 Hrs. is as violent as it is funny. It is very funny. [03 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, is decadent, overpoweringly erotic campiness coupled with soft-core pornography - blood, breasts, buttocks and big teeth. It's daring and those with a taste for the sexily sanguine will find it delightful. But it's not for the prudish. [13 Nov 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It is an agreeable example of how a picture conceived as "product" need not condescend to the audience it exploits. [11 Apr 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The film is a respectable, claustrophobic and slick piece of work, and cinematographer Nestor Almendros' color strategies - Rembrandt-like light at night, lemony tones during the day, desaturated sepia at Auschwitz - are arty to a fault. [14 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    In High Hopes, Leigh regularly expresses love for the very people to whom he is putting the boot... As a satire, High Hopes is an esthetic joy. [14 April 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The Lost Boys mixes comedy and horror with a dexterity that augments each. Dracula and Peter Pan were antipodal products of the same society: bringing them together has resulted in a marriage that would make Bram Stoker snicker and J.M. Barrie bawl. [1 Aug 1987, p.C5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Silkwood is a friendly, kooky and caring film. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    F/X
    In the hallowed Hollywood tradition of mindless flash, F/X turns the suspension of disbelief into airy entertainment. [7 Feb 1986, p.D3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The movie remains an embodiment of Spielberg's commercially cunning brand of clankingly retro filmmaking, despite the wit and charm brought to their Spiel-speak dialogue by the talented young performers, The Goonies is less a movie than an entertainment machine. [7 Jun 1985, p.E1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    For all its contrivance, it's lively and amusing and occasionally disconcerting in its reproduction of what life was like in the mid-to-late teens.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It's got thrills and chills and one of the most elegantly conceived monsters in the history of movies.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Buffy The Vampire Slayer should be a mess, but it's not. It's a mini-comic triumph, and although it's technically a teen movie, it's in the tiny genre of sophisticated, darkly funny teen films such as Heathers and Pump Up the Volume. [4 Aug 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    As torpedoes shoot through the seas and depth charges pass by, carrying their whining cargo of destruction, Das Boot brings the presence of death to within a whisper of the eardrum.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    One does not expect to find references to Bertolucci in a action movie distributed by American International, but Mad Max is no ordinary action movie: it's a B-movie classic on the order of Truck Stop Women, and when its director, George Miller, steals from established filmmakers, he steals from the best. [15 April 1980]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The cinematic strategies are energetic without being vulgar, the words are plain-spoken, and moony Mel's melancholy is what matinee idols are made of. [18 Jan 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Realism by nature offends the dogmatic, and Michael Mann, in a writing-directing debut that makes one want to see his next movie instantly, is a devotee of the realistic in factual essentials, if not in esthetics. [27 Mar 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    At two hours and 43 minutes, Eastwood's Bird is a hypnotic, darkly photographed, loosely constructed marvel that avoids every cliche of the self-destructive-celebrity biography, a particularly remarkable achievement in that Parker played out every cliche of the self- destructive-celebrity life. [14 Oct 1988, p. C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Kindergarten Cop is fast, loud and obvious, but there are unexpectedly delicate touches. [21 Dec 1990, p.C10]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    A surprisingly large portion of the picture is given over to a gritty and unexpectedly moving examination of a senseless but understandable feud between two wrongheaded, sincere people making all the wrong moves. [21 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    This low-budget horror film, sophisticated far beyond its budget, is the work of John Carpenter, an authentic prodigy whose style recalls both Martin Scorsese and the Brian De Palma of "Carrie," but who has a metaphysical, sophomoric sense of humor both of those directors lack.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Spielberg hooks us again with state-of-the-art craft, the director taps into powerful myths, both primal and pop, and makes them seem new. He allows grownups to return to childhood, but manages to catch fish in all generational waters.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    An efficient, cold-blooded sci-fi splatter movie that never makes the mistake of forgetting that on some level it is deeply ridiculous.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The movie blows through the Brat Pack smoke screen - it is superior to Colors in that regard - to reveal the troubled, lonely and sometimes crazy males behind the macho, misogynist posturing of men in groups. You couldn't find a nicer bunch of killers. [12 Aug 1988, p.C3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    An adolescent-oriented farce so finely tuned it projects beyond its narrow intended audience - it's not only for adolescents, it's for anyone who remembers what adolescence was like. [05 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It's an undemanding yet bright delight. [16 Mar 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Paradoxically cerebral and primal, reasonable and anti-rational, life- affirming and nihilistic, Naked Lunch is a sensual and intellectual feast. It will not be a meal to everyone's taste, but in its bizarre class, there is nothing classier. [10 Jan 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    In Hollywood terms, Beverly Hills Cop harks back to the semi- good old days, to the studio era when stars were not always relied on to fix everything - this is unquestionably a star vehicle, but the star, an employee of his own production company, has been smart enough to surround himself with other, by no means lesser lights. [4 Dec. 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Brooks' bravery is spiriting; in his debut he has written an unlikeable character doing unlikeable things to likeable people. One wishes his talent as a director matched his chutzpah. [17 Mar 1979]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The reign of the last emperor, a reign in name alone, was an exercise in style over substance; it is perhaps fitting that his cinematic biography should follow the same incarcerated course. [20 Nov 1987, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Days of Thunder relies on charm, loud noise and a few racing sequences to print money with Cocky's visage on the bills: there can be no suspense because there can be no possibility Cocky will lose. [29 Jun 1990, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The achievement of Educating Rita is a function of the distinguished performances, the agreeably archetypal situation and the scissor-sharp lines. [23 Sep 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Scarface is a B- movie with singularly silly psychological pretensions: its neo-primitivism is to the complex moral cosmos of Francis Coppola's "Godfather" saga as Disney is to Dickens. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Rocky V, for all its faults, is not awful. It is inferior to the charmingly naive, Cinderella-in-sweat-pants opener of 14 years ago, but it's far superior to every other overdetermined installment. [21 Nov 1990, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    There is something very wrong with the attempt of Nine 1/2 Weeks to excite the sensualists and appease the moralists at the same time. Most of the sex is fairly mild, but there are hints of what Nine 1/2 Weeks must have been before Lyne was forced to recut it. [21 Feb 1986, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Like Pretty Woman, Green Card doesn't aim high - comedy, sentimentality, sex and pathos are sufficient for its scheme of fantasy things - but with the exception of MacDowell, it achieves its modest aims unerringly. [11 Jan 1991, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Judged by the standards of the comedies that preceded it (and only by those standards), Ghostbusters is relatively sophisticated: it substitutes the silly for the gross, and even manages at the odd moment to take silliness into the sublime. [9 June 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    There is one thing you can say for the new horror film Phantasm (at the York): it certainly has its moment. [5 May 1979]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The frantic pleasures of this film add up to what used to be considered good fun; good Saturday morning fun; good Saturday morning fun to eat pancakes and pour maple syrup by; good fun that, once the day begins, is good fun soon forgotten. It's a pity Flash Gordon can't be screened at the breakfast table. [6 Dec 1980, p.E7]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Is it worth seeing? Yes. The ability to charm in the modern world is rare, and Ishtar does charm. Essentially, it's a teen film for adults, which is to say, it's mindless but not stupid good fun. And there are at least four times when the audience laughs out loud.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    What's wrong with The Color Purple - and nothing that's wrong with it keeps it from being a joy to watch - is what you'd expect of Spielberg: he chews on Alice Walker's hard edges until they're gummy. [21 Dec 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Despite some casting problems, director paints a convincing portrait of a frenzied world. [11 Dec 1987, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    No matter how many times the script instructs us that Valmont is "conspicuously charming," Malkovich is not charming, conspicuously or otherwise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The Dead Zone, from the book by Stephen King, a horror novelist whose prolific output is the scariest thing about him, is academic filmmaking all the way, a crafty Establishment tour de force. [21 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    There are individual sequences alternately amusing and touching. [08 May 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    First Blood is a gung-ho action flick fast enough and brutal enough to become Stallone's first non-Rocky hit; on the profound sympathetic levels it seeks to address, however, it is an emission of profound stupidity. [22 Oct 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Black Stallion Returns is not a magic monument - it's only a terrific film for kids. [26 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Mosquito Coast is a work of consummate craftsmanship and it's spectacularly acted, down to the smallest roles (Martha Plimpton as a classically obstreperous preacher's daughter, for example), but its field of vision is as narrow and eventually as claustrophobic as Allie's. [28 Nov 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The film is primarily an excuse for Chase to demonstrate that though he may be a movie star he has yet to learn how to create, let alone sustain, a character, and for director Harold (Caddyshack) Ramis and screenwriter John (National Lampoon's Class Reunion) Hughes to demonstrate that some movie stars get the colleagues they deserve. [2 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The plot is squeezed dry in this bloody Valentine from Hollywood and becomes annoyingly predictable. Thriller stumbles on its own success
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Writer-director Tommy Lee Wallace is not, as can be gathered, a born auteur, but he is crafty at timing the jumpies - despite a silliness that increases as the movie goes on, there are enough left-field shocks to please even the most discriminating fan of what American Film has dubbed the "genre non grata. [25 Oct 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Delicatessen is a carniverous sausage - lots of fat, a few meaty bits. [10 Apr 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    This is an honestly moving, ungainly film. [25 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Although Tom Stoppard's script lifts Ballard's spare dialogue directly from the page, the context in which it is placed is kitsch. [11 Dec 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Rob Reiner's not up to it: when the movie is meant to be romantic, the tone is frequently mushy and sexless, and when it's meant to be anachronistic and satiric, it's vaudeville-vulgar.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    If you see Clue only once, and it's hard to imagine seeing it more than once, even for the five different minutes, the "A" is by far the best, featuring as it does (this does not give away the identity of the murderer) a splendidly funny shtick from Madeline Kahn. [13 Dec 1985, p.D5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    When it's good, it's because it's imitating its predecessor (but it suffers from tired spilled blood) and when it's bad, it's because it's imitating its own imitators. [31 Oct 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Year of Living Dangerously is chic, enigmatic, self-assured - and empty. [18 Feb 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    There are lively, compelling scenes, particularly in the first hour - Raimi has an indubitable talent for camp mayhem - but the picture escalates into absurdity and the last half hour, essentially a chase sequence, is marred by suprisingly cheesy special effects. [24 Aug. 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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