For 173 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 A Fish Called Wanda
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 173
173 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The most amazing thing about this amazing movie may be that in the end it communicates the large uncertainties and small hopes of a twisted, inarticulate adolescent boy perfectly, and wordlessly. [14 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    If everyone in One False Move keeps making mistakes, there are no false moves from the technicians or actors; the only flaw is the slight taint of convenience that attends the plotting of so many contemporary thrillers. But the taint is superficial - it's eventually overwhelmed by the smell of corruption, the odour of pain, and the stench of hopelessness. [4 Sept 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Days of Heaven is so unapologetically beautiful, so calculatingly gorgeous, it is certain to arouse resentment in the minds of those who find visual hedonism a sin in movies, and to arouse suspicion, if not outrage, in those who require that movies have heart. [22 Sept. 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    It may be true that in gambling money won is twice as sweet as money earned, but inart, only the earned has savor; The Color of Money earns enough of it to turn most other movies persimmon with esthetic envy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Ragtime itself twinkles with delight - perhaps only an immigrant, and a recent one, could have made this film, which looks squarely at the social problems gnawing at North America but which finds, within them and without them, cause for hope. [20 Nov 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Never before has Allen been able to integrate comedy and pathos as deftly as he does in Manhattan. [28 Apr 1979, p. 17]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Mesmerizing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    A loopy, loving nine innings full of comic curve balls, emotional home-runs and euphoric, summertime music.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Hair is entertaining - even fabulously entertaining - because it is so strange, so young, so innocent, so beneficent and adolescent, so lovable and so loving; it is entertaining because it is - all of it is - so impossible, so remote, so inconceivable in any place anywhere outside of a Hollywood musical. [28 Mar 1979]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The virtue of Midnight Run is not that it does anything new; the virtue is that it does everything old so well.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The intensity of the film verges on the intolerable.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, is certainly indebted to the plastic and neon schlock of Hollywood director Frank Tashlin, but the farcical epic of actress Pepa Marcos is closer in innovative energy to the transformations of Fassbinder than to the recycling of Spielberg and De Palma. [20 Jan 1989, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Cat's Eye is a slickly efficient and very funny omnibus of tongue-in-cheek menace, reminiscent of the best Twilight Zone episodes. [20 Apr 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Inoffensive in its simplicity; its high, if naive, spirits send viewers out into the all too real streets clothed in the glow of a fantasy well-spun.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The Fly is a mass-market, horror- film masterpiece that is also a work of art; it is the very movie the timorous feared "Aliens" would be - a gruesome, disturbing, fundamentally uncompromising shocker that accesses the subconscious. [15 Aug 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    It's an unpredictable, mesmerizing journey nearly every shady second of the way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The Doors is excessive, unsubtle, emotionally brutal and stylistically sadistic, but that's exactly right for the dark side of the sixties Morrison and his band embodied. [01 Mar 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The intelligence and wit of this glass-slipper heart-of-gold fantasy are shocking.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Missing from Married to the Mob, written by Barry Strugatz and Mark R. Burns, is the freewheeling structure, but everything else that makes Demme one of the friendliest of major U.S. directors is in glorious evidence. [19 Aug 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Spader, the actor who rose to prominence in sex, lies and videotape, is excellent at delineating the erosion of Michael's conventionally celestial ethics, while Lowe, the actor who rose to prominence in the home version of sex, lies and videotape, is equally good at delineating the solidity of Alex's unconventionally sulphuric sadism. Sadistic or not, Alex knows how to give good time. So does Bad Influence. [12 Mar 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    A quick and clever thriller as nasty as a piece of shrapnel snapping the sound barrier, 48 Hrs. is as violent as it is funny. It is very funny. [03 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    La Bamba may in many ways be a catalogue of cliches, but they are cliches that Valens was able to live for his people for the first time, and they are cliches that Luis Valdez has been able to film for his people (for all people) for the first time.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, is decadent, overpoweringly erotic campiness coupled with soft-core pornography - blood, breasts, buttocks and big teeth. It's daring and those with a taste for the sexily sanguine will find it delightful. But it's not for the prudish. [13 Nov 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It is an agreeable example of how a picture conceived as "product" need not condescend to the audience it exploits. [11 Apr 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The film is a respectable, claustrophobic and slick piece of work, and cinematographer Nestor Almendros' color strategies - Rembrandt-like light at night, lemony tones during the day, desaturated sepia at Auschwitz - are arty to a fault. [14 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    In High Hopes, Leigh regularly expresses love for the very people to whom he is putting the boot... As a satire, High Hopes is an esthetic joy. [14 April 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Timeliness aside, it's an electrifying and erotic film-noir thriller in the Hitchcock tradition - James Stewart could have been cast as Tom Farrell - right up to the final five minutes, which feature a surprise ending that is a shock primarily because it makes little logical sense; surprise endings should click satisfyingly into place once the shock has worn off, but this one stirs up questions that refuse to settle. [14 Aug 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Peggy Sue is by no means a masterpiece of movie art, but it is an example of the sort of thoroughly enjoyable middle-brow Hollywood picture - clever, thoughtful, literate - that went missing about the time Peggy Sue got married. [10 Oct 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The Lost Boys mixes comedy and horror with a dexterity that augments each. Dracula and Peter Pan were antipodal products of the same society: bringing them together has resulted in a marriage that would make Bram Stoker snicker and J.M. Barrie bawl. [1 Aug 1987, p.C5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Silkwood is a friendly, kooky and caring film. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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