For 132 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 A Fish Called Wanda
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 78 out of 132
  2. Negative: 34 out of 132
132 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Witness is satisfying on so many levels it stands with "Cabaret" and "The Godfather II" as an example of how a director in love with his medium can redeem its mainstream cliches. [07 Feb 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    A serious and funny and subtle work - a work of art - that was easy to confuse with exploitation teeny-bopper quickies because it did what the quickies had tried to do. But Diner did it right. [22 Apr 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Scorsese and Schrader have made a courageous film that people of all religions or no religion should be able to watch with identical fascination. [10 Aug 1988. pg. C.4]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The Doors is excessive, unsubtle, emotionally brutal and stylistically sadistic, but that's exactly right for the dark side of the sixties Morrison and his band embodied. [01 Mar 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Marshall elicits performances from Williams and De Niro that are exceptional. Awakenings is a small, simple movie about a large, complex issue, the waste of human opportunity. [19 Dec 1990, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    The deployment of the hardware may be extraordinary, but it doesn't overshadow the human dimension of this summer sequel. [4 July 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Days of Heaven is so unapologetically beautiful, so calculatingly gorgeous, it is certain to arouse resentment in the minds of those who find visual hedonism a sin in movies, and to arouse suspicion, if not outrage, in those who require that movies have heart. [22 Sept. 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Scott
    Once you overlook the laborious contrivance of Jerry's background, Down and Out in Beverly Hills is a sharp, sweet comedy of affluent manners. [31 Jan 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It's got thrills and chills and one of the most elegantly conceived monsters in the history of movies.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    For all its contrivance, it's lively and amusing and occasionally disconcerting in its reproduction of what life was like in the mid-to-late teens.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    This low-budget horror film, sophisticated far beyond its budget, is the work of John Carpenter, an authentic prodigy whose style recalls both Martin Scorsese and the Brian De Palma of "Carrie," but who has a metaphysical, sophomoric sense of humor both of those directors lack.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    As torpedoes shoot through the seas and depth charges pass by, carrying their whining cargo of destruction, Das Boot brings the presence of death to within a whisper of the eardrum.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    An efficient, cold-blooded sci-fi splatter movie that never makes the mistake of forgetting that on some level it is deeply ridiculous.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    At two hours and 43 minutes, Eastwood's Bird is a hypnotic, darkly photographed, loosely constructed marvel that avoids every cliche of the self-destructive-celebrity biography, a particularly remarkable achievement in that Parker played out every cliche of the self- destructive-celebrity life. [14 Oct 1988, p. C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Missing from Married to the Mob, written by Barry Strugatz and Mark R. Burns, is the freewheeling structure, but everything else that makes Demme one of the friendliest of major U.S. directors is in glorious evidence. [19 Aug 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, is decadent, overpoweringly erotic campiness coupled with soft-core pornography - blood, breasts, buttocks and big teeth. It's daring and those with a taste for the sexily sanguine will find it delightful. But it's not for the prudish. [13 Nov 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Paradoxically cerebral and primal, reasonable and anti-rational, life- affirming and nihilistic, Naked Lunch is a sensual and intellectual feast. It will not be a meal to everyone's taste, but in its bizarre class, there is nothing classier. [10 Jan 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    A quick and clever thriller as nasty as a piece of shrapnel snapping the sound barrier, 48 Hrs. is as violent as it is funny. It is very funny. [03 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The film is a respectable, claustrophobic and slick piece of work, and cinematographer Nestor Almendros' color strategies - Rembrandt-like light at night, lemony tones during the day, desaturated sepia at Auschwitz - are arty to a fault. [14 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Buffy The Vampire Slayer should be a mess, but it's not. It's a mini-comic triumph, and although it's technically a teen movie, it's in the tiny genre of sophisticated, darkly funny teen films such as Heathers and Pump Up the Volume. [4 Aug 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    A surprisingly large portion of the picture is given over to a gritty and unexpectedly moving examination of a senseless but understandable feud between two wrongheaded, sincere people making all the wrong moves. [21 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    An adolescent-oriented farce so finely tuned it projects beyond its narrow intended audience - it's not only for adolescents, it's for anyone who remembers what adolescence was like. [05 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It is an agreeable example of how a picture conceived as "product" need not condescend to the audience it exploits. [11 Apr 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Silkwood is a friendly, kooky and caring film. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It's an undemanding yet bright delight. [16 Mar 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The cinematic strategies are energetic without being vulgar, the words are plain-spoken, and moony Mel's melancholy is what matinee idols are made of. [18 Jan 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Kindergarten Cop is fast, loud and obvious, but there are unexpectedly delicate touches. [21 Dec 1990, p.C10]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The movie blows through the Brat Pack smoke screen - it is superior to Colors in that regard - to reveal the troubled, lonely and sometimes crazy males behind the macho, misogynist posturing of men in groups. You couldn't find a nicer bunch of killers. [12 Aug 1988, p.C3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The Lost Boys mixes comedy and horror with a dexterity that augments each. Dracula and Peter Pan were antipodal products of the same society: bringing them together has resulted in a marriage that would make Bram Stoker snicker and J.M. Barrie bawl. [1 Aug 1987, p.C5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The movie remains an embodiment of Spielberg's commercially cunning brand of clankingly retro filmmaking, despite the wit and charm brought to their Spiel-speak dialogue by the talented young performers, The Goonies is less a movie than an entertainment machine. [7 Jun 1985, p.E1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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