Jeannette Catsoulis
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For 987 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Out of the Clear Blue Sky
Lowest review score: 0 Prince of Swine
Score distribution:
987 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Good Ol’ Freda celebrates an intensely private witness to four of the most public lives in pop-culture history.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie’s biggest entertainment, however, is not the market-share rivalry between MakerBot Industries, in Brooklyn, and the younger Formlabs, in Boston, but its fearless dive into dweeb-culture head space.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite excellent stunt work and a too-brief appearance by Orlando Jones as an unflappable cop, the movie -- unlike Mr. Douglas’s hairdo -- never rises above mediocrity.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Embracing outraged victimhood the way Angelina Jolie embraces a close-up, Ms. Basinger, doing double duty here as an executive producer, appears oblivious to the script's idiocies.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Shot with some wit and considerable speed, its short, sharp beatdowns are a refreshing change from the bloated action sequences favored by some of Mr. Kang’s genre contemporaries.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Tasteful to a fault, Berlin 36 turns real-life controversy into disappointingly tepid drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the developing bond between the two men — one of whom is virtually nonverbal — is credible and even touching, the storytelling is too oblique to reel you in.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Placing sex and gender identity at the center of almost every conversation, the writer and director, Eric Schaeffer, is so keen to demythologize that the film’s potentially most affecting moments are too often smothered by the hackneyed characters and setups that surround them.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Quaintly old-fashioned in style, plot and special effects, this familiar tale of female derangement and institutional abuse is too tame to scare and too shallow to engage.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Having devoted much of their lives to combating lupine myths by introducing Koani to wonder-struck schoolchildren, Mr. Weide and Ms. Tucker are ill served by a director who reduces the anti-wolf lobby to caricature and the debates over reintroducing wolves to the Northern Rockies to grossly biased clips.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Well-intentioned but philosophically timid, For My Father wants to meditate on the moral reshuffling that can accompany imminent death. But the director, Dror Zahavi, is ill served by a screenplay (by Ido Dror and Jonatan Dror) too attracted to coincidence and too repelled by the existential brink.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If you can resist the urge to run for the exit, you may leave the theater feeling a lot more hopeful than when you went in.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Your enjoyment of Paper Heart will hinge almost entirely on your receptiveness to Ms. Yi and the extreme iteration of social awkwardness she represents.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Purports to be a documentary about the American public school system. In reality, however, it’s a bludgeoning rant against a single state — New Jersey — which it presents as a closed loop of Mercedes-owning administrators, obstructive teachers’ unions and corrupt school boards.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A forest of talking heads and pointing fingers, The Empire in Africa is a noble but failed attempt to explicate the tragedy of the 11-year civil war in Sierra Leone.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Relies less on the novelty of its premise than on the positioning of solid actors in minor roles (including Melissa Leo and Martin Donovan as the tortured parents of a murdered child) and the intelligence of its star.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If making a decent movie required only good intentions, then Pray for Japan would be off and running. As it is, though, this muddled collage of random impressions and personal histories, emerging from last year's destruction of the Tohoku coastline by the earthquake and tsunami, doesn't document a tragedy so much as repeat a mantra.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Featuring the usual fractured visuals, generic victims and pinballing cameras — both hand-held and mounted on bike helmets — Exists nevertheless has an unusually dreamy opening and a few surprisingly entertaining tweaks.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though buoyed by Anthony Marinelli’s moody score and Denis Maloney’s gutsy cinematography, Self-Medicated suffers from severe dramatic droop.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An unabashed sales pitch for international adoption, Thaddaeus Scheel’s Stuck aims for the heart much more than the mind.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Radiating a distinctly retro vibe, this throwaway thriller from the German director Christian Alvart tosses a bone to Renée Zellweger, who chews it to a nub as Emily Jenkins, a harried social worker.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Information leaks into the film via the radio and a few flashbacks, but Wrecked is mostly free of dialogue - and, unfortunately, suspense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Best enjoyed as a sampling of Ms. Zorrilla's combustible energy and still dazzling screen presence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Soon becomes tiresome, but it’s emblematic of a film that is dancing as fast as it can to entertain.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fat, Sick may be no great shakes as a movie, but as an ad for Mr. Cross's wellness program its now-healthy heart is in the right place.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Form and content fight to the death in Wondrous Oblivion, Paul Morrison's defiantly gauzy tale of racial friction in 1960s England.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Has a friendly, blue-collar vibe (Cody is an ex-fish-sorter from the Shiverpool, Antarctica) and some sly, low-key humor. Nevertheless, a moratorium on penguins might be called for, despite the inevitable anthropomorphic void.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Free of blood, bruises and visible trauma, DOA revels in its fakery. And though the film presents more exuberant female flesh than hiring day at Hooters, it's strictly for titillation.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offered only hints of life away from the barre or of Sy’s relationship with his coolly poised benefactress, viewers will see either a very fortunate young man or a beautiful protégé, dancing as fast as he can to please everyone but himself.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A gay tragedy in three acts and more than a dozen excellent songs, House of Boys conveys an emotional honesty that overrides its dated style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Glinting white vistas and endless light blanket On the Ice, a frigid drama that's tough to warm up to.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A “Decalogue” for special-ed students, The Ten leans too often toward the bizarre and the bewildering. And though rough sex is a recurring motif, the movie’s overall tone is less blasphemous than raunchy.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There is something cozy and a little claustrophobic about Henry Jaglom's indulgent Hollywood satires.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Clogged with court transcripts, medical records and repetitive (if moving) patient testimony, Burzynski tickles the mind only at the cost of trampling the eyes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Why, then, do we care not one bit when Pulitzers are won and bullets unsuccessfully dodged? The answer lies partly in Mr. Silver's refusal to elucidate the racial politics or engage with the world outside the film's incoherently chaotic bubble.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Little more than an archipelago of historical set pieces linked by a syrupy causeway of sentiment, JK Youn’s Ode to My Father may have slain them in South Korea, but its packaged pain and bullet-point structure are likely to leave Western audiences cold.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Pitching uncertainly between cute and creepy, engaging and weird, this farcical story draws energy from a wickedly eccentric Ann-Margret, having a high old time as Ben's doting mother.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A minor chiller and major downer from the talented Alexandre Aja.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A charmingly sentimental but ultimately pointless hommage to the sci-fi classics of yesteryear, Alien Trespass proves only that while styles and technology have moved on, the affection for corn is everlasting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite the film’s sketchy aesthetic and barely animate lead, its tone is carefully contrived: I’ll wager no one in your circle is as dryly funny or spontaneously surreal as Harmony’s nonsupport group.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The writer and director, Mark Goffman, sticks to a no-frills style that makes the film feel longer than its 1 hour 24 minutes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A documentary that purports to chronicle the sober and urgent work of those who ferret out human-rights abuses, but instead plays like a portrait of a rather glamorous marriage.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Everyone’s sorry about something in Forgiveness, a glum drama about the way repentance can do more damage than the sin that precedes it.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A moody thriller with more emphasis on mood than thrills.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A minimalist mood poem to loss and alienation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Spurred by the medical and emotional problems of her own three children, Ms. Abeles embarked on a deeply personal inquiry into the insanely hectic lives of too many of our offspring.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A lesbian-foodie fairy tale that keeps its appetites well under control. The title may hint at naughty pleasures, but the director, Pratibha Parmar, is more interested in pappadams than passion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This scattershot investigation of the effects of Internet pornography on female behavior only ruffles the surface of a complex issue, one that demands a much larger sample than three white, educated women.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ms. Weisman offers a deluge of information. But for those not already versed in the lingo or the people involved, the movie plays like a blurry primer to an anarchic, mysterious world.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Belle and Sebastian fans will be fully sated; everyone else might feel as if they’d consumed a meal consisting entirely of meringue.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Feels passé and lacks a charismatic lead. Too bad Daniel Radcliffe is an only child.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a talky, predictable, less-audacious-than-it-thinks romantic comedy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Korean director Hong Sang-soo unleashes yet another emotionally stunted antihero in Night and Day, a rambling study of male arrested development.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A brief appearance by Joey Lauren Adams adds a welcome warmth to the standard therapist role, but otherwise all is bewilderment and repetition.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A mildly engaging lowlife odyssey that struggles not to choke on its own style.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Falling back repeatedly on in-your-face symbolism — especially with regard to the specter of decline — Mr. Salvadori seems content to idle in neutral.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For all its many irritations, You Wont Miss Me has undeniable punch, a frayed energy that feels janglingly unstable. Is Shelly crazy or just a pain in the neck? We're not really sure, and neither is she.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unless you're among those who still drop acid as a midnight-movie apéritif, your enjoyment of this retro oddity remains far from guaranteed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film takes 70 minutes and a lot of silly chatter to conclude what every woman well knows: wearing hooker heels will have most men eating out of her hand. Or, if she's lucky, licking her aching feet.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At its best when merging shocks with social commentary, this halting compilation improves significantly as it nears the end of the alphabet.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The swings from goofy to gory and jokey to tragic cancel one another out, and Mr. Diliberto’s near-constant voice-over is irksome. As is the pivotal romance.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Directed with extraordinary empathy by Aaron Katz (who also wrote the story), Dance Party, USA is an admittedly slight movie, but one that is given heft by a yearning tone and a camera fascinated by the emotional shifts and shadows on a young person's face.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Arcady’s reliance on heavy-handed melodrama, on screaming women and on worried-looking men, winds everything so tightly that the anguish plateaus and the characters begin to seem like chess pieces in an argument.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A sugary, aggressively anthropomorphized story of one avian interloper and a whole bunch of human obsessives.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Milk of Sorrow is constrained by a rarefied screenplay and a near-mute central performance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This stylistic restraint may help deflect accusations of exploitation (though the film's two pivotal sex scenes both feel uncomfortably extended, the initial crime lasting a squirm-inducing six minutes), but it also impedes our connection with the victims.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As an interrogator Ms. Ismailos is no Torquemada; she lobs softballs that her subjects genially accept.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Documents courage, but steers clear of character.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At least 30 minutes and several scams too long, the plot passes from amusing to confounding long before the final double-cross.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A well-meaning but inexpertly dramatized account of the roundup of 13,000 Parisian Jews in the summer of 1942.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Saw IV is bloody proof that Jigsaw may be dead, but his well of corporeal abuses has yet to run dry.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While at times fascinating, this trudge through statistics, graphs and grainy film of cholesterol bubbles and arterial plaque may challenge even the most determined viewer.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Grim, intelligent and vividly photographed by the director’s father, Philippe Lavalette, Inch’Allah works best when the camera alights on Ava and Rand, whose marvelously mobile faces convey all the complexity that Chloe lacks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Horror without suspense is like sex without love: you can appreciate the technicalities, but ultimately there’s no reason to care.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a frustratingly superficial look at a smart, driven and sometimes frightened young man who always felt as though he were "racing against time."
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though not without its charms -- the scenes in Mumbai are comically chaotic -- Offshore might have raised more chuckles when it was made, in 2006, than in the economic chill of 2009. And not only in Michigan.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Johnson doesn’t give fateful weight to the breadcrumbs that guide James forward. Glancing encounters and faltering conversations unfold lightly and with a visual seductiveness that the cinematographer, Adam Newport-Berra, crescendos in the film’s drifting, transformative middle section.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a narrow, albeit intriguing window into a technological revolt that deserves a more far-reaching film than this one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The plot of Mars owes at least as much to bodily fluids as it does to science fiction.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What makes the journey compelling is the relaxed chemistry between the young actors and an insistently apprehensive tone that pervades even the most prosaic exchanges.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Working with four interchangeable Deweys, the filmmakers create a sufficient number of lively stunts to keep the kiddies amused, though the film's wittiest moment -- a canine parody of Dudley Moore's first glimpse of Bo Derek in "10" -- will be appreciated only by their parents. In trying to straddle both age groups, however, Firehouse Dog proves decidedly less nimble than its furry star.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Audiences will be either captivated or irritated, depending on their tolerance for high-concept whimsy and high-energy theatrics. By the end of the wake itself, they may be wishing Binew’s illness were running ahead of schedule.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hectic and harebrained, this galloping French thriller tosses a potpourri of plot points - crooked cops, sleazy gangsters, stolen drugs and an underage hostage - into a packed-to-the-gills nightclub, and stirs. Repeatedly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Does little but raise an alarm, then leave it jangling.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As the film picks up speed it also accrues a socially progressive agenda. If only this were half as well developed as the female leads.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Technically innovative but narratively moribund, Metropia is all stasis and shadows. Perhaps Mr. Saleh could have listened to a lighter voice.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 45 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Playing like a mashup of tropes from far superior small- and large-screen entertainments (Scandal, House of Lies, Ides of March), this clunky feature from Bill Guttentag is satire at its most soft-bellied and toadying.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By anyone's reckoning, Predators is a middling 1980s B movie; too bad this is 2010.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    You may see scarier movies this year, but none so redolent of decomposition.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Too leaden for adults and too baffling for kids.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Creepy, silly, startling, irritating, and black-vomit-and-multicolored-urine disgusting, The Oregonian wears out its welcome within 30 minutes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even those viewers who share the film's conviction that preparing a collection for New York Fashion Week is inherently fascinating may lose interest long before the final frock is fitted.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Preachy and pretty, Heaven is a classy-looking product with a vanilla flavor and a pastel palette.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    We've heard it all before, if not in the schoolmarmish tones of Glenn Close, whose patronizing narration ("The earth is a miracle") makes the film feel almost as long as the life of its subject.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Neither educational nor engaging.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Burdened by a ludicrous script and messy direction, Ms. Kirkland — a headstrong veteran performer who is nothing if not game — has proved that she can play this kind of role in her sleep. If only the movie around it were worthy of her efforts.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This archipelago of maneuvers, however jaw-dropping, never coheres into a real movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A Michael Keaton outing is always cause for celebration, no matter how ramshackle the vehicle ("First Daughter," anyone?) or paper-thin the role.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More tired than the fantasy it promotes, A Previous Engagement aims at middle-aged women with the subtlety of a pitch for bladder-control medication.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Uninvolving and cliché-ridden (even shape-shifters, it seems, deserve a falling-in-love montage), Blood & Chocolate is "Romeo and Juliet" with fewer manners and more exotic dentition.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An extravagantly corny ode to the collapse of the Cleveland mafia in the 1970s.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A balloon of cuteness that makes you yearn for a pin, What If is Saturday night comfort food for those who need to believe that even the most curdled among us can find a mate.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Banker teases us with a dizzy, dislocating shooting style that throws up a succession of eerily arresting images. Even so, his film never overcomes the fact that watching drugged-out wastrels is rarely interesting — unless, of course, you’re one of them.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even more inadvisable was the decision (whether made by Mr. McLean or his backers) to transform the mercurial psychopath Mick Taylor (a truly menacing John Jarratt) into a roguish cartoon.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This poor-surfers-make-good drama from Morgan O’Neill and Ben Nott relies more than it should on toned thighs and taut gluteals. Be grateful; there’s nothing to see on dry land that’s anywhere near as compelling.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Playing characters with no real substance, the actors struggle to develop a sense of shared peril.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s all a bit precious and predictable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dignified to a fault and crammed with historical worthies (like a pre-deportation Emma Goldman), this dry tour of union hall strife and kitchen table sentiment wears its sympathies proudly.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Crisply shot and surprisingly well acted, Mother's Day suffers from an overly long script (a tornado hovers off screen to no apparent purpose) and annoying glitches in continuity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smothering insightful moments in verbal and musical treacle (courtesy of Harriet Schock’s sticky songs), Mr. Jaglom displays an endearing lack of cynicism but an equal lack of discipline.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A modern-day noir weighed down by redundant narration and a forced plot, The Girl Is in Trouble feels like a tug of war between the actors, who understand the need for lightness, and dialogue that emerges in expository clots.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite Ms. Janssen's fine taste in music - it's lovely to hear Jorma Kaukonen's "Genesis" on the soundtrack - her film's downfall was ensured by a leading lady who will always be more credible chasing zombies than the American dream.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s a riveting story lurking inside Holly, a documentary-fiction hybrid about sex trafficking in Cambodia. It’s just not the one the filmmakers want to tell.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Essentially, we’re watching dead people refuse to lie down, yet the acting isn’t terrible, and Scott Winig’s photography is satisfyingly bleak and grimy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This drippy dramedy embraces every inappropriate-oldster cliché with depressing calculation.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Narratively and emotionally, this weirdly becalmed trifle by Maria Sole Tognazzi ends up almost exactly where it started.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    To experience Chimpanzee, the latest piece of gorgeously shot pablum from Disneynature, is to endure an orgy of cuteness pasted over some of the most asinine narration ever to ruin a wildlife movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A muddled morality tale more interested in coming of age than getting of wisdom.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Written and directed by Sean Mullin, a comedian and onetime Army officer (he plays a comic in the film), Amira & Sam is more successful as a portrait of veteran alienation than as a romance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offsetting its outlandish premise with believable performances, Rage (Rabia) delivers a heavy-handed metaphor for immigrant invisibility.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Whether on a Middle Eastern battlefield or the streets of New York, characters converse in stilted, expository mouthfuls that smother emotion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This gentle comedy, while entirely unmemorable, releases a genuine warmth that deflects harsh judgment. It doesn’t, however, excuse characters that are little more than props for embarrassing fashion or delivery systems for dated slang.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The most depressing thing about this series is not the creativity of the bloodletting but the bleak view of human nature.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Plays less like a documentary than an E! exposé of lowlife skulduggery.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An exhausted pileup of rock-movie clichés, The Perfect Age of Rock 'n' Roll presents artistic self-destruction with the solemnity of a movie that has invented a spanking-new genre.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A faux documentary grounded in ethnicity and mired in absurdity, Finishing the Game is a terrific idea still waiting to be fashioned into a real movie.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A raunchy romantic comedy that, like its heroine, rarely has both feet on the ground.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Proceeding in a tone of unrelieved misery, Coldwater is a punishing, predictable drama that’s almost rescued by strong acting and good intentions.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What could have been a moderately entertaining short film is yanked to intolerable lengths in Killing Bono, a shapeless rock-music caper that, like its deluded antihero, just doesn't know when to stop.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Reuben is a whiny and uncoordinated prodigal son. His constant chafing at himself and the world is the film's biggest problem; by the midway point we're all wishing him back in Finland where he belongs.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though not without substance, National Security is marred by writing that’s not nearly as creative as the torments it portrays.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Intermittently beautiful but frustratingly leaden, Shutterbug labors ineffectually to promote authenticity over artifice. A heavily stylized paean to undoctored images, the movie never quite clicks as a succession of moving ones.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Imagine spending an afternoon watching a bunch of vagrants putter around on an abandoned city lot, and you've pretty much nailed the viewing experience of Earthwork, a painfully dull account of a year in the life of the Kansas crop artist Stan Herd.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfocused and repetitive, this feature-length commercial by Jeremy Snead uses a muddled timeline and bargain basement graphics to produce a horn-tooting, “Aren’t games awesome?” tone.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An awkward blend of anti-Semitic atrocities and identity-swapping absurdity, the World War II drama My Best Enemy struggles to find a convincing tone.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Defa and his cinematographer, Mike Gioulakis, are united in their disdain for information over mood: as the camera skitters spastically around its troubled schlub, the film becomes a muddy, minimalist moan of desperation.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With slapstick smothering the scares, [REC 3] is further marred by a plot in which the muted Catholicism of its antecedents is turned up to full blast.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This mawkish rom-com mines class, ethnic and ambulatory boundaries for cheap laughs and cheap-looking visuals.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Puzzles more than it pleases.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Employee of the Month is more tired than a Wal-Mart greeter at the end of a Saturday shift. One can only hope its halfhearted suggestion that winning isn't everything is some comfort if the movie's grosses are as disappointing as its jokes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Pairing a dull romance with an even duller sport (at least as represented here), this cliché-ridden vanity project is more suited to the ABC Family channel than to the inside of a movie theater.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If some of the characters won't be returning for the sequel, no matter. In all likelihood, neither will the audience.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Puberty causes an exponential increase in evil -- and in incoherence -- in The Grudge 2.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Too much of the film feels like shorthand, a trail of teasing crumbs to lead us to the inevitable sequels.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This well-acted debut feature from Michael Connors (a former Army captain) is too limited in ambition and scope to satisfy our expectations.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A movie singularly lacking in rock-doc unpredictability and verve.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Taking place almost entirely inside computer-simulated global locations, "Retribution" moves closer than ever to its airless video game roots.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A low-budget horror anthology with segments both ghastly and moronic.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Red Hook Black crawls forward by means of stilted conversations and vacuous exchanges.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Easy on the eyes but brutal on the ears.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The turtles themselves may look prettier, but are no smarter; torn irreparably from their countercultural roots, our superheroes on the half shell have been firmly co-opted by the industry their creators once sought to spoof.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An intermittently interesting but fatally clichéd comedy of personal and professional suicide.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The best antidote to all the glowering and posing is Eva Green: As Ava, the titular dame, she’s nothing short of a godsend.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Idolized in some quarters and reviled in others, Mr. Korine, now 37, may be a bit long in the tooth for the enfant terrible act.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hounddog is never more than a sluggish dawdle from shack to swimmin' hole and back again.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Part infomercial, part public-service announcement, Trade of Innocents carries such a suffocating human-rights burden that it never had much chance of becoming an actual movie. Yes, child trafficking is horrific; but embedding your raise-the-alarm mission in a film this inept runs the risk of arousing more amusement than activism.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This is screenwriting by numbers. Unlike, say, Ken Loach’s marvelous “Bread and Roses,” Under the Same Moon is too busy sanctifying its protagonists and prodding our tear ducts to say anything remotely novel about immigration policies or their helpless victims.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The journey from page to screen may have battered Mr. Welch’s novel, but its lamenting heart beats loud and clear.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offering neither balance nor solutions (a segment on the overuse of medications like Ritalin is especially powerful, but especially in need of counterargument), The War on Kids questions what kind of citizens we are producing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A warning to parents everywhere about the dangers of indulging irrational behavior, Opal Dream is a sickly sweet tale of deep dysfunction masquerading as family solidarity.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This crackpot thriller from the usually competent Jim Sheridan leaves only one mystery unsolved: what on earth was he thinking?
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The women share their dreams, their thoughts on relationships and some of the hazards of their work. The serious, thoughtful responses carry the film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Notable at least in part for its fumbled potential, this health-care-industry melodrama possesses all the right ingredients: an idealistic young lawyer, a corrupt corporate villain and a sympathetic victim. It just fails to assemble them into a compelling whole.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a feature-length version of the television sitcom “My Name Is Earl,” only Canadian -- and not funny.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Jack & Diane offers a glaring example of a writer and director, Bradley Rust Gray, unable to trust in the simple strength of his material.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Say what you like about "America's Next Top Model," any single episode of Tyra Banks's campy confection offers more insight into objectification and disposability than this film in its entirety.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Donaldson has proven deftness with panting plots and knife-edge tension, but this cobbled-together noir does him no justice at all.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Whether viewed as empowerment tools or aphrodisiacs, stress relievers or deadly bodyguards, these weapons and their owners never cohere into an actual point.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mundane conversations and outings drag on while the central mystery takes baby steps forward, suggesting that a shorter running time or a more developed script might have better served the originality of the premise.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sincere performances elevate an underdeveloped script and awkward filmmaking in The Dry Land, a coming-home drama as inexpressive as its traumatized lead.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This debut feature from Matthijs van Heijningen is as stiff as the Antarctic tundra. Where the earlier film pulsed with precisely calibrated paranoia and distinctly drawn characters, this inarticulate replay unfolds as mechanistically as a video game.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Placidly photographed and lacking in urgency, "Survival" shows us the living flailing at fate and the dead just flailing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An animated twist on the Frankenstein story that never sparks to life.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The message may be clear -- suppress the past at your peril -- but the execution is a mess. As for the line-dancing soldiers, your guess is as good as mine.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A coming-of-age tale so treacly it doesn’t just tug your heartstrings, it attempts to glue them to your ribs.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a movie that isn't crummy, exactly, just blah: when the freakiest teeth on screen belong not to one of Walt Conti's animatronically realized sharks but to a good-ol'-boy called Red, you know you have a problem.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Set in North Florida and based on a book by Harry Crews, The Hawk Is Dying is a dreary study of male angst groaning beneath the weight of its own symbolism.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For the thickheaded thriller Assassin's Bullet the Bulgarian actress Elika Portnoy dreamed up a story with three roles for herself and fails to convince in any of them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie imprisons its talented cast (including Alia Shawkat as Danny’s overlooked soul mate and Brandon Hardesty as his worldly best friend) in roles that leave little room for anything but caricature.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Reeking of self-righteousness and moral reprimand, Michael O. Sajbel’s Ultimate Gift”is a hairball of good-for-you filmmaking.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The sledgehammer message is clear: Best friends can help when you need a McMansion, but only God can help when your husband needs a man.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This pointless parody dumps us in the fictional town of Sporks, Wash., a location lousy with vampires and werewolves.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In this blood-splattered wasteland, neither original ideas nor acting skills flourish.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Political menace stalks youthful idealism in Putin's Kiss, a portentous, rather creepy documentary that masks its lack of historical context with an atmosphere of accumulating threat.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    However good the intentions, this sluggish documentary about the stigma of substance abuse and the barriers to recovery never comes close to catching fire.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite smatterings of wit and a stable of skilled performers, C.O.G. struggles to find a consistent tone, its episodic structure veering from farcical to poignant to dangerously raw.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfortunately, in keeping its inflammatory subject matter at arm’s length, Provoked does exactly the same to its audience.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sluggish and derivative, I Am Number Four is another elaborate puberty metaphor with superpowers substituting for testosterone.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    His (Jackson) doleful revenant is in almost every scene, and this hardworking actor seems to know that the film around him should be a light-footed caper instead of a grim noir with a side order of deviance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A love triangle with fangs but no bite, the German import We Are the Night is mostly infatuated with its own stylish excesses.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offensive only in Mr. Wortham's dreadful acting, Now & Later is part of a series at the Quad called "Unrated: A Week of Sex in Cinema" - a title that should ensure plenty of backsides on seats.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Self-consciously edgy and romantically limp.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Flash Point”attaches coldly professional visuals to a narrative so baffling that it’s rarely clear who is pounding on whom or why.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s precious little to laugh at in The Sasquatch Gang, a sad attempt to board the loser-nerd comedy bandwagon.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Louder and more literal than its inspiration, The Eye benefits from a spiky performance by Alessandro Nivola as Sydney’s rehabilitation counselor. “Your eyes are not the problem,” he tells her at one point. He is so, so right.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The problem with these my-family-was-messed-up-and-I need-to-share projects is that they require an audience of complete strangers to give a damn. And while we sometimes do, it’s usually because the material is inherently compelling (“Tarnation”) or the filmmaking uncovers truths beyond the template of family therapy (“51 Birch Street”). Sadly, Phyllis and Harold fulfills neither requirement.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If the 20-odd seconds of blank screen squatting pointlessly amid the opening credits aren't enough warning that you're in for some seriously sluggish storytelling, then the adoption of a snail as one of the central motifs should drive the point home.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exhaustive and exhausting, the new energy documentary Switch is so monotonous it makes "An Inconvenient Truth" look like "Armageddon."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This latest recycling of foreign-grown frights shows less interest in horror than in healing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    the Australian drama Felony proves only that skilled actors and slick photography can tart up even the most problematic script.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An ostensible romantic comedy that's really just a grating portrait of an irredeemable jerk.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An ill-advised sequel to "Are We There Yet?" and a feeble fable of better parenting through home improvement.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Trotsky runs 20 minutes too long and several rungs above the head of its target audience. And though Mr. Baruchel can be very funny in small doses -- a slacker sidekick in “Knocked Up,” a gung-ho kid in “Tropic Thunder” -- here he swiftly becomes insufferable, a neurotic nudnik in funeral director attire and John Turturro hairdo.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If wallowing in the creative hiccups of tortured scribblers is your moviegoing goal, there are much better options.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Belonging more in the realm of tragic melodrama than true crime, The Sicilian Girl is hobbled by sluggish direction (by Marco Amenta, who previously addressed Atria's story in his 1997 documentary, "One Girl Against the Mafia: Diary of a Sicilian Rebel"), and a revulsion to nuance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Heartfelt but enervated, Song One noodles around the Brooklyn music scene without stirring up magic.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unable to shape these events into a dramatic structure, the director, Camilo Vila, resorts to a meandering tale of random indignities suffered by a lead so bland he comes across less as principled than as stupendously naïve.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like one of those machines that can inhale a car and spit out a tidy cube of squashed components, Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles is a near-indigestible lump of clips and quips and snipped opinions.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Eyes popping and mouths agape, Martin Lawrence and Raven-Symoné mug their way through College Road Trip as if it were a silent movie -- which, come to think of it, would have been a lot less irritating.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a movie that feels more like a free-market sales pitch than like a critical look at one weapon in the poverty-fighting arsenal that may or may not offer long-term hope.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stagy, stiff and marinated in egg cream.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Leaving no cliché unturned, Coffee Date provides cheesy music, chats about "gaydar" and the obligatory are-you-looking-at-mine? urinal scene.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though both actors deliver performances more credible than the plot that frames them, their authenticity only highlights the script's affection for improbable coincidences and an ending even Garry Marshall might consider too pat.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The best thing about Small, Beautifully Moving Parts is its admission that a positive pregnancy test is not always cause for giddy celebration; the worst thing is that, even at a lean 73 minutes, this flimsy road movie feels at least 43 minutes too long.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Alien invasion is just an excuse for romantic farce in Extraterrestrial, a tiresome roundelay of lies, lust and leaping paranoia.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 35 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Whichever side of the aisle you inhabit, you will leave The Iron Lady feeling disgusted; you will also feel cheated - of information, insight or even an identifiable point of view.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film version is now being granted a limited release. Exactly how limited will depend on your tolerance for tasteless behavior, extravagant overacting and a decibel level to rival the unveiling of Oprah’s Favorite Things.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Seriously depleting the skanky-villain bin at central casting, the moronic thriller Gone stars Amanda Seyfried as Jill.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie's amoral momentum is fatally slowed by an acronym-heavy script and flimsy characterizations that offer fine actors -- including Rip Torn as Tom's contemptuous father and Naomie Harris as his missed opportunity -- little to play.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Newlyweds are slaughtered, a child kidnapped and a suicide bombing foiled, all of it advanced by chunks of clumsy dialogue and embarrassingly labored acting.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie speeds up and slows down as though controlled by a director in the grip of competing medications. For those who make it to the final beatdown, however, the only pill worth taking is the one that makes you forget.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Maddeningly muddled and frustratingly counterintuitive... the story shuttles between Hong Kong and mainland China without a noticeable gain in logic or reduction in decibels.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    James Cameron upstages the ocean in Deepsea Challenge 3D, a shallow vanity project that invites us to join him in marveling at his own daring.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As depressing as the résumés of its 9-to-5 characters, The Strip sweats to wring laughs from overworked themes and underwhelming performances.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Aiming for a moody portrait of psychological distress, Mark Jackson directs with a sluggish pace, an abstract style and a dismal aesthetic that rebuff involvement.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Without Mr. Roberts and his grinning insouciance, this well-meaning mess would have no heartbeat at all.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A painfully gauche, galumphing attack on factory farming, meat eating, animal experimentation and human supremacy.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smooth and folksy, it traffics in broad, unchallenged claims that serve a single purpose: to persuade us that the only thing wrong with today’s farming methods is our misinformed perception of them.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In grabbing for the heart this one-size-fits-all fable sadly ignores the mind.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    From its "once upon a time" beginning to the anticlimactic end, Footprints remains fatally lodged in La-La Land.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Harnessing mostly fine actors to a wholly asinine script, the directors, Melisa Wallack and Bernie Goldmann, have created a movie as spineless and dithering as its benighted namesake.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Pointing at everything and elucidating nothing, Hello Herman arrives freighted with the anti-bullying agenda of its director, Michelle Danner.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A dreary, interminable drama written and directed by Eva Aridjis, is exactly one-third of a good movie. That third is Frank Wood's beautifully modulated and modest central performance.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Underdog may have been originally created to sell cereal for General Mills, but this latest incarnation couldn't sell Frisbees at a dog park.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unevenly directed by Isaac Feder, Sex Ed droops.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The entire film seems to be happening on the other side of a dirty window - good news for the dreadful computer-generated effects, if not for our eyes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Rehashing characters and plots from the "Law & Order" playbook, the director, Rafal Zielinski, supplements his material with religious iconography and more gauzy close-ups than a Barbra Streisand marathon.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This bizarre sort-of satire featuring insane characters doing incomprehensible things might be forgivable if it were even mildly amusing. It's not.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The writing is so poor and the visual embellishments so few that some of the violence, like the frequent attacks on the base by local villagers, make little sense.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gives you the creeps, the giggles and the groans in almost equal measure.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sweetness and whimsy fill the screen to capacity in I'm Reed Fish, a rural coming-of-age tale that's so laid-back that its cast is almost horizontal.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Saving most of its special-effects pennies until the final five minutes, Hangar 10 struggles to build a science-fiction movie from little more than a ghost of an idea and an infamous location.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A shallow commentary on how an artist’s talent can be subsumed by the desire for fame and fortune. Or maybe just by the need to make a movie.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Kitamura, an action enthusiast who prefers to show rather than tell, seems unaware that the film’s dialogue is laughable, its characters unfathomable and the acting often less than optimal.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smothered by a storm of visual tics — and the tiniest of nods to “Rear Window” (1954) — any social commentary takes second place to multitasking gimmickry.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film has a bare-bones look that only intensifies its nearly painful sincerity.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This soulless, sterile romantic comedy has slipped under the wire to give audiences a headache and Matt LeBlanc’s reputation a relapse.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Expelled is an unprincipled propaganda piece that insults believers and nonbelievers alike.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie has been thoroughly eclipsed by "Captivity" the marketing.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film never finds its dramatic footing. Nor, sadly, its common sense.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This dissociation leaves the supporting cast to its own devices, with no one suffering more than the appealing Eva Mendes as Johnny's true love, Roxanne. If Ms. Mendes ever finds a director willing to allow her to perform with her shirts fully buttoned, there will be no stopping her.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Feeding over-the-top language to underdeveloped characters, Deon Taylor’s Supremacy dramatizes racism with an unvarying intensity that quickly becomes wearing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A lackadaisical dive into backwoods barminess and masculine neuroses, this low-budget paean to indoor plumbing and rampant facial hair doesn't unfold so much as unravel.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Not even a dewy heroine and a youth-friendly vibe can disguise the essential ugliness at its core: like the bloodied placards brandished by demonstrators outside women's health clinics, the film communicates in the language of guilt and fear.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Screaming "vanity project" from every hackneyed frame, Drawing With Chalk is yet another example of midlife American males doing all they can to avoid acting their age.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    To borrow RuPaul’s delightful catchphrase, the only possible response to a project like this is to advise it to “sashay away.”
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Filmed on Hatteras Island, N.C., Vacation! meanders like an endless summer's day; even its tragic conclusion feels incongruously fragile.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This quivering effort from the director John Erick Dowdle only increases in impenetrability whenever anything mildly curious occurs.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Features annoying characters navigating unbelievable situations.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett direct with competence but a dispiriting lack of originality.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As artificial as the inseminations it celebrates, Delivery Man is a soggy comedy more focused on stimulating your tear ducts than your funny bone.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Captive seems tailor-made to explore the psychological damage that a child can suffer over a lengthy confinement, but instead leans too heavily on the chilly desolation of Paul Sarossy’s cinematography. What’s going on in the victim’s mind, or anyone else’s, is as invisible as what lies beneath the snow.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The writer and director, Joby Harold, claims to have been inspired to write the film while suffering from a particularly painful kidney stone. Watching it may be for some a comparable experience.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Jay Alaimo’s sour tale of suburban greed and marital disappointment, can’t even deliver a temporary high; mired in the blahs, the blues and the midlife crazies, this poor man’s “American Beauty” slowly sucks your will to live.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like much of Ms. Cody’s work, Paradise plays out in quippy sound bites, only this time they feel entirely unsuited to Lamb’s sheltered background.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In lieu of tension, the film is stuffed with crazed musical crescendos, amateurish structural feints and pregnant pauses that cry out for the familiar “chu-CHUNG” of a “Law & Order” scene change.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A limp urban comedy not nearly as whimsical as its title.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The barnacle-encrusted plot...is dumbed down to the studs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    You may not believe it's possible to bore people to death with a film about risking your life, but The Wildest Dream comes shockingly close.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As the uniformly annoying characters stumble around, screaming and cursing, we don't give a hoot for their survival. Quite the reverse: we're counting the minutes until the asylum's ghostly inhabitants silence them for good.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dry as new bank notes and doggedly uncinematic, Simon Yin's $upercapitalist approaches the seamy side of international finance with a story as stale as the subprime meltdown.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s all just so much empty eye candy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Were it not for the charming Patrick Bruel as a no-nonsense security expert and Alice’s unlikely suitor, this spun-sugar concoction would be well nigh unwatchable.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Jolene's skin may smell like warm milk to Brad, but to the rest of us it has curdled long before she leaves his bed.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Plagued by clunky action sequences and a porous plot the cast visibly wilts.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More focused on philosophy then feeding, “Kiss” marries a mash-up of undead clichés (I know, let’s have another lingering shot of the moon!) to hilariously stilted conversations.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the film's final, disturbing image forces race to the forefront and belatedly raises wider issues of persecution, its most controversial suggestion is not that Jesus might have been black but that he might have been a really terrible actor.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A limp sci-fi comedy with fewer laughs than a meeting of Abductees Anonymous.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its fusty air and glumly earnest performances, this unnecessary reminder of Steven Spielberg’s soppy 2011 staging of another of Mr. Morpurgo’s novels, “War Horse,” is about as entertaining as trench mouth.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite Mr. Stormare’s valiant efforts, “Dark Summer” (directed by Paul Solet) feels listlessly plotted and insipidly performed.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An unruly mash-up of terrific anecdotes and terrible teeth, grainy film and garish memories, Who Killed Nancy? cares less about investigating a death than about vindicating an accused killer.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A Rubik’s Cube of shifting sexual orientation and elaborate sex fantasies, “Sloppy Seconds” gathers all the accouterments of soft pornography -- cheesy music, low-rent acting and attractively framed genitals -- into a plot of stunning imbecility.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Robert Nathan’s Lucky Bastard is a sorry-looking found-footage thriller as unconvincing as its characters’ thrashing orgasms.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Luridly earnest and laughably immoral, Illegal Tender is an old genre movie with a new look. Call it Hispanixploitation.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie’s setup has underdog appeal in spades. But it’s all for naught in a screenplay, by Elissa Matsueda (working from Joshua Davis’s 2005 article in Wired magazine), that plays down intellect in favor of corn and cliché.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This lifeless adaptation only proves that making entertaining movies out of hard-to-swallow ideas is as challenging as you might think.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Anyone looking for the lowdown on haute cuisine will be sorely disappointed: devoid of emotion, context or narrative, the baffling avant-garde techniques and extreme politesse of the lab become oppressively dull.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An unappealing jumble of sex, regret and hero worship, “Bert Stern” is an odd tribute to brilliance muffled by lust.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This witless installment features the usual ultra-slow-motion mayhem and helpful freeze-frames to allow us to admire the extra dimension. Fans will not be happy, however, to learn that Ms. Jovovich is more decently clothed this time around.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As she learns the value of public schools and pickup trucks, her erstwhile friends in Philadelphia seem happy to be rid of her. By movie's end, you'll feel exactly the same.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ornamenting its flimsy back story with assaultive sound effects and asinine behavior, Out of the Dark strains to shock.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Arriving as inevitably as puberty, Bratz introduces the swollen-headed, fashion-addicted dolls of the title to a live-action movie.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hilary Brougher’s Innocence (based on Jane Mendelsohn’s 2000 novel) moves to the formulaic beats of the second-rate TV movie, albeit one cloaked in an ultra-glossy sheen.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Soured by its enervated star and uninspired writing, the movie offers only tiny moments of joy, like a hailstorm of gumballs that's unexpectedly magical.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This shockingly flabby effort from Mr. Anderson — who, in features like “The Machinist” (2004) and “Session 9” (2001), showed a much surer hand with oppressive atmospheres and troubled psyches — feels as nutty as its characters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This emotionally manipulative, heavily partial look at the purported link between autism and childhood immunization would much rather wallow in the distress of specific families than engage with the needs of the population at large.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The battle scenes are as lacking in heat and coherence as the central love story.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dark, airless and packed with psychological hurt that seems to spring from nowhere, this angry morality play, tucked inside a police procedural, suffers from a crippling lack of back story and characters whose relationships are fraught with unexplained complexity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Filled with joyless people in drab rooms (Josh Silfen's grubby cinematography doesn't make things any cheerier), Silver Tongues takes a novel idea and uses it to jerk us around. Swirling with unease, its scenes set us up for a payoff that never materializes and strand its actors in a bitter present.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tired mash-up of every men-behaving-badly sitcom ever to grace a third-tier television network, Speed-Dating tries to coax laughs from characters so dated even Eddie Murphy would balk.

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