Jesse Hassenger

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For 208 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jesse Hassenger's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 91 American Honey
Lowest review score: 16 Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 64 out of 208
  2. Negative: 25 out of 208
208 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Jesse Hassenger
    American Honey doesn’t rise and fall on the strength of its love story, if that’s even what happens between Star and Jake. Arnold touches on a lot—rural poverty in America, class divisions, the impulsiveness and recklessness of youth—but never tames her film into a strict polemic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Jesse Hassenger
    The small miracle of Leslye Headland’s second film as writer-director is not that it sidesteps its influences or shuns its genre. It’s that it somehow makes the lusty undercurrents of its male/female friendship unironically romantic and, at times, unapologetically sexy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    The movie’s dedication to girls everywhere is unnecessary; it already feels so specific and true without it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    This is Laika’s least droll, least ghoulish feature so far; the plotting is even more dreamlike than "Coraline."
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    "Boyhood" has the natural endpoint of its lead growing into a young adult, while Girlhood stretches out in front of Marieme, an uncertain path into a haze.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    The series will doubtless continue on with Diesel, Rodriguez, Johnson, and the rest, but in the meantime, Furious 7 comes to the most conclusive and emotionally satisfying ending since, fittingly, the very first film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    Unlike many comic vehicles and just as many big-city romances, it’s a real, and ultimately rewarding, piece of work. A big-studio romantic comedy infused with actual human feeling is just as rare an accomplishment as the perfect comedy sketch.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    In the end, McKay’s edu-tainment tactics work, even if the laughs aren’t as hearty as his broader work with Ferrell. The Big Short pulls off its own oddball gambit: grabbing attention through fringe wonkiness rather than a tantalizing glimpse at bro-banker lifestyles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    Director Declan Lowney does an admirable job making a confined film look cinematic without overblowing it into action-comedy mode.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    It’s a testament to the wealth of this material that the point is a passing one — just one incidence of institutional hypocrisy among many.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    Creed works far better than it should, and does so twice: as the unexpected payoff to a nearly 40-year-old series, and as the confirmation of a major talent in its director.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    If this all sounds more than a little familiar, it’s probably because similar material about young-ish women growing up and maybe apart has been staged recently and on a variety of scales, from the scrappy intimacy of "Frances Ha" to the broader comedy of "Bridesmaids." Life Partners isn’t as ebullient as the former or laugh-out-loud funny as the latter, but it maintains a sharp specificity about both of its lead characters’ lives.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    The tension between Boyle’s restless energy and Sorkin’s tendency to run in place drives the movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    Occasionally, the movie’s combination of formula and tweaks makes it play like a one-blockbuster-fits-all reconciliation of a standard Disney checklist with a second list of corrective measures. For the most part, though, the movie feels more heartfelt than calculated.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Jesse Hassenger
    Despite its upstart distributor and relatively low-key cast, it’s an unabashedly mainstream movie; compared with edgier, more indie versions of onscreen American youth, it might even look a little pat.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Efron imbues his handsome-dope routine with such nuance that Teddy is not only funny but also touching in his sincere desire for brotherhood, in short supply postgraduation. What could have been simplistic self-parody becomes a genuinely, almost confusingly terrific performance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    If The Lego Movie was a delightful tribute to the multifaceted experiences of playing with Legos, this movie is like one of the licensed sets that inspired it: Less essential, more market-driven, and still irresistible for certain kids, fans, and nerds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    This is an uncharacteristically unsubtle work from Lee — yet in the end, it’s not ineffective.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    The lack of dialogue makes Shaun The Sheep easy for younger children all over the world to understand, and the film is undeniably intended for that demographic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    While The Man From U.N.C.L.E. probably isn’t any less of a caricature of its period than "Sherlock Holmes," it carries its fakeness with more snap in its step. The imaginary intrigue it generates is fleeting, but often beautiful.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Here Scafaria makes nice use of her widescreen frame, and cuts the movie together crisply—a lot of the jokes actually come from the cuts, and the way they punctuate the often pitch-perfect dialogue.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Rogen and Goldberg start with spoofery and work their way into something bolder and stranger; it’s as if playing in the Pixar sandbox, or a reasonable approximation thereof, can’t help but inspire creativity.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    It’s exactly the sort of oddball trifle, like Hudson Hawk, that tends to attract the ire of baffled audiences and grumpy critics. It’s also the sort of oddball trifle that, like Hudson Hawk, will put certain aficionados of silliness in a pretty good mood.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    While it’s more technically elaborate treatment than the characters have ever received, it’s also gentler and more eye-pleasing than any of Blue Sky’s other features. It‘s also a neat extension of Schulz’s style—though, granted, no one needs to see Pig-Pen’s permanent cloud of filth rendered more vividly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Even when it’s slowing down, Fight shows beguiling confidence in both its filmmaking and its characters—enough to make its smallest romantic moments feel significant.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    There are times when the slight, small Sparrows Dance pushes too hard, both visually and narratively: a blinking red light outside Ireland’s window provides overly fussy on-off lighting during two long scenes, and the movie’s flairs of serious conflict are less deft than its offhand moments of connection. There are enough of said moments, though, to sustain its sweetly hesitant romance.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    The smoothness of the movie’s individual sequences bumps up against narrative raggedness, as Affleck labors to compress a sprawling, novel-ready narrative.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Spy
    Spy, similarly, doesn’t exactly send up James Bond or Jason Bourne espionage thrillers, but it places McCarthy in the middle of the action while subverting the traditionally male domination of that arena.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Without an emotional core, a stronger sociological angle, or many visceral thrills, Black Mass more or less limits itself to procedural status. Within those aims, it’s a pretty good one, absorbing and well-made.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jesse Hassenger
    Even if this Into The Woods lacks the exhilaration of the best movie musicals, it does capture the show’s emotional intimacy—no small task in a field that favors razzle dazzle.

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