Jessica Winter
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For 266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Winter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 90 Broken Flowers
Lowest review score: 0 Hide and Seek
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 266
  2. Negative: 72 out of 266
266 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jessica Winter
    With elegant restraint the film subtly intimates the wintry dead end-twilight years bereft of love, partner, or vocation-that may be in store for its aged lover man. (Payne's "About Schmidt" did too, when not gorging snidely on idiot Americana.)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jessica Winter
    Unstintingly funny -- far more so than the wince-worthy trailer -- owing to Chan's pairing with droll indie eccentric Owen Wilson, as his would-be gunslinger sidekick.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jessica Winter
    Redoubtably hilarious as always, Zahn also lends his character unpredictable flashes of anger, pathos, and faint psychosis, even when the movie jumps the median from ticklishly discomfiting black comedy into by-the-numbers horror jolts.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Jessica Winter
    In a remarkably subtle, assured debut performance, Compston evokes Billy in Loach's "Kes" and, in the heartbreaking final seaside shot, Antoine in Truffaut's "400 Blows."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jessica Winter
    Karine Vanasse, as the protagonist Hanna, is perfectly cast because she has the body of a woman and the sweet, sexless face of a child.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jessica Winter
    A scrupulous and impeccably acted account of the fallout from a family secret.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    The movie has the addictive episodic intimacy of great TV.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Amid the muddy scrubbery of the camp and its hinterland surroundings, Ghobadi catches some striking compositions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Jeff Feuerzeig's tremendous documentary runs on the motive force of intelligent fandom and radiates an ineffable grace.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Cahiers-savvy cinephiles will recognize Fanfan as the type of handsome prestige production that the French New Wave overthrew in the early '60s, but this example of the "cinéma de qualité" is hardly a musty artifact, with its compact editing, its breezy and mischievous tone, and, in a country not yet a decade removed from the Nazi occupation, its acrid anti-militarism, clear from the ash-dry narration of the opening battle sequences onward.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    The patient camera leans in closely on the three lead actresses -- extraordinary first-timers all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Often seems less a British new wave front-runner than a charming nouvelle vague tagalong,
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Though there's considerable footage of hippie activity (crafting kites, sleeping) and moments of prelapsarian frisson (a cop warns that "there's talk of the Hell's Angels coming down"), the film is resolutely performance-driven.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Chaiken ably balances real-time rhythms with propulsive incident -- she catches subtler interior strains, too.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    A veteran of commercials and music videos, director Chris Nahon crowds out too much of the sprawling combat gymnastics, but his film doesn't lack for luxuriously seedy ambience --his Paris is a retro-futurist sewer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    The entire unwieldy contraption rests on the shoulders of erstwhile "Queer as Folk" jailbait Hunnam: Bleached and bland, earnest and wooden, he's exactly what the film asks him to be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    One of the refreshing aspects of the slight, flawed Tumbleweeds is that it creates a world inhabited by recognizable people.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    As sweet and unassuming a film as they come, embraces both perspectives -- it's sympathetic to the batty throes of a first infatuation, but affably demurs at indulging them.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    In 1974 a director, a screenwriter, and a producer (Robert Evans, who for once deserves a few of the plaudits he's apportioned himself) could decide to beat a genre senseless and then dump it in the wilds of Greek tragedy. [Review of August 8, 2003 re-release]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Burnt Money arranges a triumphant martyrdom for its bad boys -- a redemptive blaze of glory, dozens of faceless corpses notwithstanding.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    The movie's subject is brotherly love in all its extremes; the trajectory is grimly inevitable, and yet its final descent still manages to startle.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Easily the best teen movie of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Unexpectedly bridges genres -- it's a buddy movie, a horror story, a boy's-own adventure, and a near metaphysical meditation on the limits of human endurance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    An engrossing study of a protagonist who variously inspires pity, clinical interest, fondness, and revulsion-sometimes all at once.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    Utterly necessary film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    He (Wolens) captures Crayola-vivid images of both the unspoiled forest canopy and denuded expanses of slash-and-burned landscape -- a bleak summation, perhaps, of the area's past and future.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Director Joe Wright coordinates a delightfully cohesive acting ensemble.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    July's witty ode to only-connecting sustains a delicate tone of pensive whimsy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The Virgin script occasionally resets a gold standard for refined crudery.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Endearing and well-acted.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Accomplished if lacking in urgency, this Oliver Twist (scripted by Ronald Harwood, who also wrote "The Pianist") showcases Polanski's proven gift for Dickensian caricature.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Carion is no Jean Renoir, but he does strike an appealingly low key of tender, faintly goofy affinity between the combatants.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The last half hour bogs down badly, with a cynical fake-out ending and a final scene that borders on non-sensical.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Tonally, however, Earnest boasts perfect pitch, thanks mainly to the blithe, nimble actors.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The photographer's show-don't-tell stance is admirable, but it can make him a problematic documentary subject. War Photographer infers the psychological and physical toll of his peripatetic existence, but provides scant insight into his technique.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Preposterous enough to entertain.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Sargent's whole enterprise doubles as a '70s archaeological dig.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    One of Gitaï's greatest assets in Kadosh is such stillness, which leaves facile outsiders' judgment out of the frame and thereby deepens our immersion in the narrative.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Doillon's ease with young performers is again seamlessly evident.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Not to imply that our Claude's gone native, but here his unabiding fascination with bourgie-style repetition compulsion bears some resemblance to sympathy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Remains a genial lesson in how to both honor and subvert womanly expectations.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Though angry and sorrowful, Trembling Before G-d, beginning with the title, is above all a work of reverence.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The performances can be stiff, but a kinetic mix of anxiety, dread, and numbed resignation is always palpable.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The wonderful-terrible dervish of Umbrellas reaches peak abandon, worthy of Vincente Minnelli, when Geneviève sobs out a plaint for Guy as a carnival whirls outside the shop.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Code Unknown is Haneke's most expansive and, oddly, hopeful work -- not a gaze into the void, but a fierce attempt to scramble out of it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Slick and sober, fiercely contemporary, and rigged by a fail-safe three-act structure, Dirty Pretty Things nimbly straddles the line between realism and popcorn pop, but it knows which side its bread is buttered on.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Hudson is ebullient, never cutesy, and her accent stays in tune.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Albeit scattershot, Phantom does cohere as a satire of keeping up appearances in which everything is as it appears.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    This film is solidly built, faithful to its material, and utterly lacking in pretense, but its maker is still running in place.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The whole of Sunshine State is less than the sum of its parts, but the parts are often lovely, and always true.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Once Drake reaches the candlelight vigil that acts as his penultimate set piece, he sustains an impossible balance between mordant wit and articulate bewilderment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The week's guilty pleasure is The Count of Monte Cristo, a gorgeously photographed, sumptuously designed adaptation of the Dumas swashbuckler boasting the most ludicrous dialogue since director Kevin Reynolds's "Waterworld."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Like a kid playing make-believe, In America is blithely confident of its own contrivances; it only benefits from a certain unselfconscious naïveté. And as with a misjudged Christmas gift or a mawkish sympathy card from a kindly relative, one can hardly doubt its uplifting intentions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Almost inevitably for a documentary of this stripe, it risks aestheticizing poverty--but here it's usually the kids themselves who compose the most arresting images.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The film marks a welcome departure from the usual rah-rah machismo of the semi-nationalist action adventure, but Jordan never escapes the mighty shadow of "The Thin Red Line"--from the grace-note inserts of exotic birds, snakes, and foliage to Ledger's laconic, sometimes haiku-like voice-over to Klaus Badelt's embarrassingly Zimmer-derivative score.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    My friend even supplied a blurbable quote: "The best dumbass-buddy comedy I've seen since "Wayne's World!"
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Unfortunately, the delicious snatches of reflexive wit function as mere intermissions between the distended action sequences and Michael Bay–style megatonnage, which have earned Pixar its first ever PG rating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Director Waters and screenwriter Tina Fey (also cast as the voice-of-reason math teacher) aim less for the usual high-gloss caricature than acutely hilarious sociology, nailing the servile malice of 15-year-old girls.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Doesn't quite know how to take its leave; it tapers off like a curling cigarette trail, but it lingers like a ghost.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Smith's work is a means of cauterizing wounds that have not even begun to heal...certainly not across a continent in Giuliani's New York.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Akerman's characteristically patient, pensive approach elegantly accommodates her reportorial responsibilities.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Meticulously uncovers a trail of outrageous force and craven concealment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Penning's film applies too much force behind its hairpin turns, but broad scripting and acting are counterbalanced by crisp photography, shivery sound design, and well-chosen debts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Spheeris gives every indication of having gotten too close to her material, but her film's overall air of discombobulation is poignant in itself.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    An international cast of curious creatures in their native habitats stars in this charming Gallic duo (Animals and Ice/Sea) of featurettes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Amid the sticky-sweet swamp of Jeremy Leven's script, Rowlands and Garner emerge spotless and beatific, lending a magnanimous credibility to their scenes together. These two old pros slice cleanly through the thicket of sap-weeping dialogue and contrivance, locating the terror and desolation wrought by the cruel betrayals of a failing mind.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    A plea for equality of opportunity, a worthy objective somewhat obscured by non-disabled actors occupying the lead roles. In any case, one imagines Rory himself would prefer a Farrelly disability blooper reel.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Niccol's fatal error is in making the protagonist at once amoral and insipid, an admixture thickened by Cage's loquacious yet stoned voice-over and Moynahan's moist-eyed tremblings as the trophy wife.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Having established Josey as the focus of the entire iron range's enmity, the filmmakers panic, and North Country spectacularly self-destructs in a climactic courtroom free-for-all.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Unfolds as a series of slightly disjointed vignettes, padded with redundant voiceover and an oppressively histrionic score.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Pleasant and undemanding, all the more so whenever Tom Wilkinson's on-screen as a possible Erlynne suitor, the movie miscasts Hunt as the pragmatic seductress.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The idea isn't as odd as it might first appear, since running a salon is one of the few socially acceptable means for a woman in Afghanistan to earn an income. The execution, however, evokes a particularly outlandish Christopher Guest mockumentary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    This sly, engrossing doc is an expert riposte to smug proponents of the fetterless free market.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The film itself is thinly conceived, except in the area of bodily misfunction. It plays like the murky B side to the immortal Gilliam-Jones epic "Monty Python and the Holy Grail."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    If Moon Shadow does sometimes overcome its sentimentalism and faulty parallels, it's because the film is altogether unburdened by cynicism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The poised Vega and pleasingly phlegmatic Sabara are resolutely uncute performers, and the reach-out-and-touch-it gadgetry carries a homey scent of proactive nostalgia. Spy Kids 2 is an island of lost Circuit Cities.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    First-time director Bonnie Hunt pays slavish adherence to the Nora Ephron rules of assembly for the prefab rom-com.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The director has a fitfully deployed gift for droll humor, but Chutney Popcorn mostly provides evidence that the ins and outs of the improvised multiparent family can be as prosaic as the nuclear Eisenhower model.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Never lacks for energy, and the director and his stars stride with focused confidence through the hooey.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The contortional physical shtick familiar from Lawrence's sitcom, laden with a dollop of Three Stooges violence, should keep the boys happy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    There are pages missing from this fable: Meadows reports that his financiers asked him to cut one-quarter of his original script just before production began, and his fondness for long takes sits uneasily beside the apparent gaps in the narrative.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    A handsome, mostly tasteful production on par with 2001's Bayley-Murdoch impersonation "Iris."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Two Men is slow and sweet as warm pudding, but Cranham and Derek Jacobi (as one of Churchill's intelligence officers) both add a generous, wholehearted gravitas the film might have thought to ask for in the first place.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Broomfield's investigatory technique remains a frustrating pileup of unfocused Q&As and misplaced credulity. But when Broomfield travels to her Michigan hometown, he pieces together a life blighted at breech-birth: a grotesque of abandonment, incest, physical and sexual abuse, pregnancy at 13, and homelessness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The uncertain plot somehow concerns ginseng and stolen objets d'art; the main thrust is acrobatic slapstick with a decided antipatriarchal twist.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    As documentary filmmaking, it's cheap and suspect. As advocacy, it's necessary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The Business of Strangers goes too far in dramatizing Julie's primal, Paula-fied surge of female fury, and the script finally mistakes respectful ambiguity for vaporous drift.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Cheeky and elusive, Last Life in the Universe inhabits a high-lonesome world unto itself, a bright daydream that dissipates in the aching gap of a missed connection.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    There's so little leavening humor here, and so much physical and emotional violence visited upon the already abject, that the film seems as pointless as the wasted lives it purports to examine.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Gets a lurching spring in its step whenever Tom Green shows up to, say, cram a live mouse in his mouth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Godard light, but not lite: Its breezy postures front for melancholia.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    As the tourist on a time budget, the usually brilliant Coogan merely mugs and flails (we can only imagine what Johnny Depp would have done with Fogg), while he and able straight man Chan enjoy scant opportunity to develop any comic rapport.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Dinosaur amounts to 80 minutes of discouraged Cretaceous trudging, punctuated by the occasional fight or stampede and one pyrotechnic coup: a truly thrilling meteor shower.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Improbably, the sequel only ups the ante on its predecessor's comedy-of-embarrassment quotient.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Boldly aspirational. It's Jeunet's stab at "Paths of Glory," dipped in a sepia bath and halfway wrenched into a women's picture.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Lovely to look at but insipid.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Bursting with grotesque burlesques of household relations.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Or
    The scoreless Or (My Treasure) consists solely of stationary shots that, while sometimes awkwardly composed, build in organic momentum and bracing detail.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Money can't buy happiness, but as Bride and Prejudice teaches us, it can get patience in bulk from a smart young woman of a practical mind-set.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Day-Lewis is as rooted as an oak in his character and milieu, yet easefully disengaged from the film's pensive histrionics.