For 818 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Williams' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Searching for Sugar Man
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 818
818 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The movie looks like it was made for broadcast television, the place where words and pictures go to die.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The actress and the aviatrix are a match made in heaven, but surrounding the soaring performance is a movie that's mostly earthbound.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's funny but (sorry, ladies) unrealistic that Jake continuously sneaks away from his young wife to canoodle with Jane. Baldwin is a blast, but the role requires him to indulge in indignities such as a naked webcam conversation.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Like a taxidermied owl, Stoker is lovely to look at, but in the end it’s hard to give a hoot.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    There's some laughing gas left in the cupboard, but this series may require an infusion of new blood to last until "American Funeral."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    This movie may be sickly sweet, but it's harmless; and as a handcrafted antidote to a toxic toy story like "G.I.Joe," Paper Heart has healing properties.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Although the outcome is as predetermined as a prix-fixe menu, the storytelling is as smooth as goose-liver pate through a pastry nozzle.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The CGI effects are a familiar sort and so is the heroic-quest motif. The principal virtue in this modest entertainment is that the young characters act like real teenagers.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's a credit to the cast and to the worthiness of the idea that this overlong movie works at all. But those of us who already know that racism is bad could use a little more challenge and a little less help.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Strange hybrid of science lesson and Saturday-morning cartoon.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Joe
    While Green is force-feeding us this hard-boiled hokum, he doesn’t distract us with many memorable images, as he did in his earliest films.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The best excuse for watching The Gunman is Penn. His first mainstream leading role in a decade is worthy of comparisons to Matt Damon in the “Bourne” movies; yet it’s also disappointingly shorn of the humor and humanity of which this great actor is capable.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Hit and Run isn't a catastrophe, but it leaves loose ends and a more adventurous map by the side of the winding road.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The difference between McKay and Efron is like the difference between a Broadway spectacular and a high school musical.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    This topsy-turvy flick is fitfully funny, but more often it's just odd, like the first draft of a "Twilight Zone" episode that's missing its moral.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The plot is murky, the acting is melodramatic and the movie is way too long, but the target audience will salivate over the inventively choreographed set-pieces.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A colorful indictment of corporate infestation, but it's missing a prescription.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    If you'd pay to see a film called "Hotel Rwanda: Maniac Manager," you might be receptive to this mixed-message movie, but skeptics should keep one eye on the exit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    With its seductive images and smart dialogue, The City of Your Final Destination has the setting and circumstances for a ripe family drama or a literary love story, yet it never awakens from its siesta.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Like an acquaintance couple's baby pictures, Friends With Kids induces coos but isn't as cute as they think.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    This true story fills a needed niche, spotlighting women's basketball in the era before Title IX promoted equal treatment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Penn has created a colorful tour guide, but in This Must Be the Place, there's no there there.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Happy, Happy has the makings of a Norwegian "Ice Storm," but it goes out with a whimper.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    There's little that's new, revealing or stylish about this basic-black horror story, but if you've got a Goth sensibility, it might suit you.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    If you haven't seen a wasting disease in real life, you might think Restless is romantic. If you have, you might diagnose it as terminally cute.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Toast is lovely to look at, evoking both the gray-green milieu of Midlands life and the sensuality of good food, but it's like a whipped topping with no base.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Canadian director Denis Villaneuve knows how to stoke a hot debate about the legacy of violence. But in this case, where there's smoke, there's not enough air.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Compared to other Marvel characters, Thor is a difficult sell.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's a compelling tale of surf and survival.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Easy to watch but hard to pin down, like a creature with eight legs going in different directions.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    There’s a lot of comic and fantasy potential here, but much of it gets squandered.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The Bay is better than a shallow exercise, but crabby horror fans may have preferred that Levinson took a real plunge.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    This true-ish story adds a romantic subplot to the prosecution of Japanese war criminals by American general Douglas MacArthur, but neither the love nor the war are completely baked.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Christopher Nolan's "Memento" was a movie-lover's dream come true, a puzzle that was engaging both intellectually and emotionally. But his Inception is a wake-up call, a blaring reminder that cheap tricks can't compensate for personal investment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Home delivers like a mailman on Valentine’s Day. But when we scratch beneath the sugary surface, there’s something tart inside that’s difficult to digest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Like a newborn planet, Melancholia is magnetically beautiful, but it's also an unformed mass of hot air.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The moral lesson that this movie feeds us smells fishy - because it's not in the book. But the backbone story about a guy who inherits some penguins is enough to tickle the kids.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Non-Stop: It is what it is.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    On that vicarious-pleasure level, the movie version delivers. Yet for anyone with a sense of irony or social justice, it’s also frustratingly soft around the edges, with no real sense of the drugs-and-violence underside of show business or the spiritual cost of failure.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's hard to imagine a better movie about corporate-sanctioned sex trafficking than The Whistleblower. But whether you're ready to confront this true story is a trickier question.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Killer Joe is one of the most repugnant parodies of small-town stupidity that you will ever see, and Friedkin amplifies the shrill obscenities with blaring cartoon and kung-fu footage from his art director's fever dreams.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Fuqua is a proficient action director, and the boxing scenes deliver plenty of whomp. But the music-saturated scenes involving the media, the law and a turncoat friend played by Curtis (“50 Cent”) Jackson are trying to appeal to fans of “Empire,” not “Raging Bull.”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Although this Swedish vehicle is thoughtfully engineered and has some vivid streaks of color, it could use a jump start to escape the vanilla ice.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A family flick that punches the right buttons like a trained seal.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Call it "On the Lakefront." Or "Pretty-Good Fellas."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The movie is an eyeful, especially in 3-D, but even with humans at the helms of the machines, it’s a hollow exercise in homage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    With its forked tongue planted loosely in cheek, this haunted-house flick is enjoyably retro in both style and substance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The ingredients are in place for a potent finale, but “Catching Fire” is watered down.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    With its broad strokes, this invitation to an important discussion is hard to ignore, but the blood and honey on the table is an unpalatable mix.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's not a good film, but viewed from a cockeyed angle, it's a great guilty pleasure, and director Bill Condon is in on the joke.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It’s too cheesy and predictable to be a real miracle, but by Vegas standards, it’s a winner.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    What's finest about Everybody's Fine is to watch a good fella groping hopefully toward old age.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    L'amour fou means "crazy love," but we don't learn anything crazy about these devoted lovers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's not quite infectious, but some of the high notes manage to drown out some of the guttural lows.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    With his glorified Frisbee and good-guy smile, Evans is engaging, but “The Winter Soldier” might be stronger with a little less Captain and a little more America.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Waiting for Superman raises important questions while wearing a big red heart on its chest, but inconvenient facts are its kryptonite.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Two incompatible movies duke it out in Bandslam. Although it's the wimpy teen musical that prevails, it's the misfit coming-of-age story that leaves an impression.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Weaving between freshness and formula, The Boys Are Back earns a gentle pat on the head.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The crescendo of two resonant careers makes the false notes of Unfinished Song forgivable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Presented as a stand-alone film, but without an explanation for the protagonist’s physical and emotional injuries, it’s a head-scratcher. As with Joe’s sexual compulsion, scratching can’t cure the itch.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A buddy comedy disguised as a political thriller. It’s full of malarkey, but as a campaign of shock and awe, it’s hard to resist.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The rapid dialogue is dry and mannered, like a David Mamet play, there's virtually no story and Cronenberg's visual scheme is cold and claustrophobic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Director Philipp Stolzl worked in the same dangerous conditions as the original climbers, and we can feel the chill and peril in our bones. It's a shame, then, that the screenwriter, unlike the camera crew and the characters, was afflicted with such timidity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's a calculated crowd-pleaser that skims over the surface of the era like a cruise-ship production of "American Graffiti."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    As much Fosse as Fellini. It’s a shadow of a shadow, refracted through a fun-house mirror. For all the noise and color, it feels like an exercise and not a natural expression.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's a little black dress of a movie, an elegant hint of something sensual that is ultimately denied to us.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Despite its brainy title, Monsters University only earns a passing grade on its looks.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    For real balance, the debate needs fiercely leftist truth-tellers in tri-corner hats, calling themselves the Organic Chai Tea Party.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    There’s much to appreciate here. Like “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” which had a stronger sense of its place in the world, this coming-of-age movie should appeal to smart, sensitive young people who haven’t been exposed to the better examples of the genre.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Whether on stage or the screen, Much Ado About Nothing is a pleasure that passes like a midsummer night’s dream.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Watson is a revelation here as a brand-obsessed bad girl.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A bizarre buffet of buffoonery, brutality and beautiful landscapes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    As a diversion, Babies is like a wind-up toy that will tickle anyone with a pulse. As a documentary, it's like a cache of home videos that will frustrate anyone with an inquiring mind.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Like Ernest Borgnine, Philip Seymour Hoffman is an unconventional leading man with an Oscar on his mantle, and his bittersweet Jack Goes Boating has elicited comparisons with "Marty."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Prince of Persia is woven of recycled fibers, but by the slipping standards of summertime entertainment, it's a magic carpet ride.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Typically lovely to look at, with big-eyed young people espousing high ideals amid natural splendor. But outside of their bubble, a prickly history looms, and Miyazaki’s dubious attitude toward the wartime role of his hero makes the movie a mixed blessing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The Equalizer, loosely based on the TV series of the late ’80s, is a guilty-pleasure platform for Washington’s slow-cooked, kick-butt heroism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A good and necessary film, but like the man himself it’s not immune to scrutiny.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    There aren't enough surprises to justify the title, but The Switch produces sufficient light for a late-summer diversion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The lesson of this likable little movie is that it’s never too late to reclaim your integrity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A serviceable behind-the-scenes tour documentary with about as much insight as a talk-show monologue.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The spoof of consumerism scores some predictable points, but the tidy ending is a sell-out to the ultimate marketing machine: Hollywood.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A tearjerking romance that belongs to another era, when female moviegoers wanted to be transported, not grounded in grim realities.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    If your inner amphibian craves a wave, you have the right kind of brain to appreciate the elemental story and scenic backdrops. But advanced mammals might smell something fishy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Max
    In its last act, Max is reminiscent of Rin Tin Tin and Lassie serials, with a frosting of freshly minted multiculturalism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Strikes an uneasy compromise between liberty and justice. It marches at an efficient pace, but there's too much collateral damage to believability.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The Holocaust must never be forgotten, but like many well-intentioned documentaries, The Flat derives more power from the implicit strength of the subject than from the explicit choices of the director.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    The most provocative thing in Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work is the moment during the opening credits when we glimpse the comedy legend without makeup.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    As the blindered Abe, relative-unknown Gelber earns a sympathetic pat on the head. But as the character is braying for attention, he's stuck in his stall, while genuine dark horse Donna Murphy carries the narrative load as the middle-aged co-worker who prances into Abe's daydreams.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    What the movie crucially lacks is the clockwork complications that produce a payoff.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Act of Valor is a competently directed action movie, but forcing the audience to wear such narrow goggles is a dereliction of duty.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    It's a triumph of streamlined design, but TRON: Legacy never enters the fourth dimension where it's worth a plugged nickel to humans.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    Hitchcock is an amusing lark, but the clumsy way it dissects the director is for the birds.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    A high-concept comedy that peddles some slapstick laughs and life lessons but little insight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Williams
    While the rich people who violated a dead antagonist's wishes seem sleazy (especially when they refuse to be interviewed), transporting world-class artwork five miles to a bigger facility where more people can enjoy it hardly seems like the end of civilization as we know it.

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