For 510 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John DeFore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 10 Raze
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 39 out of 510
510 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    As allegory, the picture requires viewers to connect most of the dots without assistance, offering a preachy bit of dialogue once or twice but failing to use action or the camera to say much about non-sanguinary addictions.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    A technically polished but mostly unmoving example of a genre (the watch-kids-do-something-hard doc) assumed to be inherently charming.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Though cheerful and highly polished, the doc's storytelling is less effective than it might've been, a failing balanced by the likability of its lead characters and the scrappy spirit of their project.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Hugely entertaining for much of its short running time before a third act that's problematic for various reasons, the film benefits from a top-notch cast and some sharp dialogue but will leave many viewers scratching their heads.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    An amiable but wholly unnecessary movie that plays like a feature-length version of those reels one watches while eating rubber chicken at a banquet honoring a much-loved artist.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Director Bao Nguyen doesn't try to dig too deep, leaving serious behind-the-scenes lore to the SNL obsessives who've been poring over backstage accounts for years. Focusing on talking heads, almost all of whom say nice things about their experience of the show, he offers a puffy remembrance just a couple of notches more substantive than the supplemental doc in a DVD box set.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Remains mostly fascinating even in an amateur storyteller's hands.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Annette Bening captivates as the self-delusionist, with Ed Harris ruggedly irresistible as the object of her fantasy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Damici more than holds the screen, too gruffly determined to be upstaged by a monster, and the script slips a clever trick or two up his sleeve.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Sincere performances and well-intentioned scripting should help it with vets eager to see their stories told on-screen, but the film's dreary, secondhand feel is hard to overcome.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Handsome and weighty-feeling but less substantial than it seems.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Goold's work never feels stagey; a smart and varied visual sense opens up even settings as basic as a jail's visiting room. But what happens in that room isn't as convincing as might be expected from these actors.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    A dicey blend that generates viewer goodwill but can't make its conflicting vibes gel, A Bag of Hammers will play best with the most soft-hearted viewers provided they don't mind rooting for unrepentant felons.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    While the personalities engage the viewer, the film's story is a diffuse one.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Will charm many arthouse patrons, though some highbrow-leaning art lovers will find the subject unworthy of such attention.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Though it doesn't quite hit the target, Plotnick's vision of the future of the past is peculiar enough to resist quick dismissal.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Diehard fashionistas will likely want to see it, but few others will take notice.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    The pic works best when it's least self-referential, focusing on romantic attractions in many stages of development. Though it won't do for its authors what Swingers and Good Will Hunting did for theirs, Loitering is smartly written enough to further their off-camera careers; thanks to predictably winning performances from Marisa Tomei and Sam Rockwell.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    The most compelling thing here by far is the film's vision of Assange, by all accounts a man of enormous self-regard and slippery ethics. Benedict Cumberbatch has the character in hand from the start.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    The wild card in all this remains Seann William Scott's Steve Stifler, the rampaging id whose indignation at his peers' maturity provides most of the film's real laughs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    The film offers some diverting background on the man.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    More a filmed haunted house than a movie, the picture is in love with the cobbled-together monsters on offer and will engender similar emotions in many horror buffs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Endearing performances buoy predictable film about love in the wake of divorce.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Convincing in its depiction of late-20s romantic anxiety (if not of that age bracket's real estate realities), it is broadly appealing without bowing too deeply to formula.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    The movie plays quite well for a while but begins to run out of steam in its second half, its occasional laughs not coming quickly enough to keep us interested in the unfolding lore of 19th century murders.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    While Lee leaves some of Park's more memorable outrages behind, he and screenwriter Mark Protosevich find one or two ways to up the taboo-testing ante, small surprises that retain the tale's edge without pushing into the realm of exploitation.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Less music-stuffed but more conceptually ambitious than the average music doc.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    A likeable if familiar underdog tale.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Director Daisy von Scherler Mayer and a strong cast do right by Neil LaBute's script (based on his play), but the soullessness of the story is a turnoff overpowering the intriguing moments scattered within these one-on-one encounters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    You ought to have to be an unusually interesting person, or at least be capable of presenting your commonplace tribulations in an interesting light, before you can ask moviegoers to spend fifteen bucks to watch you onscreen. Nina Davenport's First Comes Love doesn't buy into this rule.

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