Jonathan Rosenbaum

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For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Glengarry Glen Ross
Lowest review score: 0 The Ladies Man
Score distribution:
1493 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Don't expect any psychological depth here, but the cool wit and fun... are deftly maintained, and Sonnenfeld provides a bountiful supply of both fanciful beasties and ingenious visuals.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A nicely shaped script by Chicagoans Rick Shaughnessy and Brian Kalata makes this independent comedy drama a pleasure to watch.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a good, solid, intelligent drama about the ambiguities of what does and doesn't constitute courage under fire
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This isn't the supreme masterpiece it might have been, but Nichols's direction is very polished and some of the lines and details are awfully funny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you want to know what the Warhol scene was all about, this is even better than the documentaries.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provocative and entertaining.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Subtle and graceful directorial debut.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nevertheless, the cast of mainly unknowns is so good, and Linklater is so adept at playing them off one another, that the two-hour running time never seems overextended.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This cagey and compelling 2004 documentary looks at the world of wine, but it's actually a nuanced, provocative piece of journalism about globalization and its discontents.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Doesn't succeed in everything it sets out to do, which is a lot. But as a statement about the death rattle of 60s counterculture it's both thoughtful and affecting, and Daniel Day-Lewis is mesmerizing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To my taste the only serious distraction and ethical lapse is Gibney's sarcastic, cheap-shot use of popular songs like "That Old Black Magic," "Love for Sale," and "God Bless the Child" to underscore certain points; it seems almost to celebrate the shamelessness of the creeps being exposed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's more than a simple improvement, inverting some of the original's qualities so that the impersonal, well-crafted filmmaking remains lucid throughout.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    David Mackenzie, who directed the remarkable Scottish drama "Young Adam" (2003), delivers another masterful, disturbing tale of illicit passion, erotic obsession, and sudden death set in the 1950s.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Superior in every respect to the PBS documentary "The Murder of Emmett Till."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This brisk, free-falling fantasy about the famous collators of German fairy tales, played here as a kind of comedy act by Matt Damon and Heath Ledger, is Terry Gilliam's most entertaining work since the glory days of "Time Bandits," "Brazil," "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen," and "The Fisher King."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fernando Meirelles stresses old-fashioned storytelling and takes full advantage of his cast, including Danny Huston.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Erik Van Looy skillfully profiles both the assassin (Jan Decleir, suggesting a tougher, over-the-hill version of Michel Piccoli) and the Antwerp detectives investigating his crimes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As a well-directed star vehicle with a couple of good action sequences, this is good, effective filmmaking, but I was periodically bored; when Ford and Pitt aren't lighting up the screen nothing much happens.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Duke is a superb director of actors, and, as in "Deep Cover", Fishburne manages to suggest a lot with a deft economy of means.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Kerrigan returns with his best work to date, at least in terms of narrative drive and suspense.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Starting with its romantic and inappropriate title, this is an old-fashioned melodrama, the same movie about police corruption and a cultural crisis of morality that Lumet has been making since the 70s, starting with "Serpico".
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Absorbing and intelligent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few plot details strain credibility, but the characters (particularly the friend's sister and little boy) are persuasively depicted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The implied critique of progressive, bohemian parenting is devastating--wise and nuanced, with the painful hilarity of truth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's something a mite pathetic about our culture still clinging to 007, but it's hard to deny that this is one of the most entertaining entries in the Bond cycle, which started with "Dr. No" (1962).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's also quite energetic -- there isn't a boring shot anywhere, and writer-director Schnabel is clearly enjoying himself as he plays with expressionist sound, neo-Eisensteinian edits, and all sorts of other filmic ideas.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though the film tapers off a little toward the end, there's a climactic scene of recognition between the heroine and her father that was one of the most exquisite pieces of acting I'd seen in ages.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances are strong (my favorite is Deborah Harry as an older waitress) and the sense of eroded as well as barely articulated lives is palpable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sensitive, intelligent, enlightening, and sometimes surprising.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It clocks in at over three hours, but Peter Jackson's remake of the 1933 classic is gripping. The film rethinks the characters, turning the original's stark Jungian fantasy into a soulless but skillful set of kinetic and emotional effects.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This brilliant if unpleasant puzzle without a solution about surveillance and various kinds of denial finds writer-director Michael Haneke near the top of his game, though it's not a game everyone will want to play.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But if you can get swept up in the story, the movie is imaginative and compelling.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But the acting's so good it frequently transcends the simplicities of the script, and whenever Day-Lewis or Postlethwaite is on-screen the movie crackles.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Starting off as a low-key psychological drama, this suddenly turns into a murder mystery that's resolved awkwardly and ambiguously, but the fascination of the characters and milieu remains.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    None of the moral ramifications of this dilemma is avoided, and to the film’s credit the behavior of the American press seems more questionable than the machinations of third-world justice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Equally impressive is Duncan's stylish handling of decor, dialogue, narrative ellipsis, and pacing, all of which call to mind the Hollywood master Ernst Lubitsch.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There isn't an ounce of flab or hype, and the story it tells is profoundly affecting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though Hanks keeps the satirical and critical aspects of this look at show biz fairly light, there's a lot of conviction and savvy behind the steadiness of his gaze, and his economy in evoking the flavor of the period at the beginning of the picture is priceless.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    4
    Puzzling, intriguing, and often compelling, apparently set in the present but magical and futuristic in tone.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Roman Polanski's first film in English (1965, 105 min.) is still his scariest and most disturbing--not only for its evocations of sexual panic, but also because his masterful employment of sound puts the audience's imagination to work in numerous ways...As narrative this works only part of the time, and as case study it may occasionally seem too pat, but as subjective nightmare it's a stunning piece of filmmaking.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Greengrass takes pains to keep events believable and relatively unrhetorical, rejecting entertainment for the sake of sober reflection, though one has to ask how edifying this is apart from its reduction of the standard myths.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brilliantly conceived and competently executed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cuesta directs the lead actors with such feeling that their misery seems authentic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Volatile and sometimes daring performances by Catherine Deneuve, Gerard Depardieu, Gilbert Melki, Malik Zidi, and Lubna Azabal (as twins) contribute to the highly charged and novelistic experience.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Just when I'm ready to write off the mockumentary as an exhausted form, along comes this delightful and hilarious improv comedy from the UK in which a bridal magazine sets up a promotional contest for the best offbeat wedding.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Gondry is a soft surrealist without much of a sociopolitical agenda, closer to Dr. Seuss than Luis Buñuel,
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's most memorable about it is the period flavor, including a detailed and precise account of the jim crow complications blacks had to contend with.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Although most of the elements are familiar and virtually all of the characters are unpleasant, this is a better than average melodrama--mainly because of the volcanic power of Kathy Bates in the title role.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Many reviews have suggested that this is as politically mild as a John Sayles movie, but Linklater clearly agrees with the frustrated kid who says, "Right now, I can't think of anything more patriotic than violating the Patriot Act."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An amiable demonstration of how two charismatic actors and a relaxed writer-director (Brad Silberling) can squeeze an enjoyable movie out of practically nothing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This comedy drama is an exercise in self-indulgence for O'Toole, but an enjoyable and touching one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can't think of a better portrait of contemporary Paris or the zeitgeist of 2001-'04 than Chris Marker's wise and whimsical 58-minute 2004 video...no one can film people in the street better than Marker or combine images with more grace and finesse.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Bernardo Bertolucci's visually ravishing spectacle about the life of Pu Yi is a genuine rarity: a blockbuster that manages to be historically instructive and intensely personal at the same time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The virtues on display are very much those of the heroine: generosity, imagination, charm, and the capacity to keep an audience mesmerized with a good story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If the relatively prosaic Minghella, making his movie debut, lacks the suggestive poetic sensibility of Lewton, he does a fine job in capturing the contemporary everyday textures of London life, and coaxes a strong performance out of Stevenson, a longtime collaborator. Full of richly realized secondary characters and witty oddball details, this is a beguiling film in more ways than one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A singular and essential figure of the Argentinean new wave; [Alonso] is not quite the minimalist some claim, but he can make the simple act of filming feel so monumental that storytelling seems secondary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Francis Coppola's stylish and heartfelt tribute to the innovative automobile designer Preston Thomas Tucker turns out to be one of his most personal and successful movies.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This David Cronenberg masterpiece (1991) breaks every rule in adapting a literary classic - maybe On Naked Lunch would be a more accurate title - but justifies every transgression with its artistry and audacity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main interest here is the juxtaposing of Gosling's Method acting with Hopkins's more classical style, a spectacle even more mesmerizing than the settings.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are high-spirited, with nice ensemble work from Almodovar's team of regulars, but the playlike structure (originally derived from Cocteau's The Human Voice but drastically reworked) is disappointingly conventional.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Adapted by Van Sant and Daniel Yost from an unpublished autobiographical novel by James Fogle, this 1989 feature has the kind of stylistic conviction that immediately wins one over.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thanks to a remarkable script by Bruce Joel Rubin and the directorial skills of Adrian Lyne, this works as both a highly effective stream-of-consciousness puzzle thriller offering the viewer not one but many "solutions" and an emotionally persuasive statement about the plight of many American vets who fought in Vietnam.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    John Zorn's ethnically tinged score is effectively minimalist without succumbing to Philip Glass-style monotony, and Harris Yulin is effective as the hero's semi-estranged father.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Quirky and nuanced, this movie has a lot to say about sibling rivalry and the current music scene.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Enhanced by Jason Staczek's superb score, this is characteristically intense and, unlike most of Maddin's silent-movie models, frenetically edited.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie overall may be routine, but Donner gives it some spark and polish.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Franklin and Murray manages to live up to the demands of a thriller without sacrificing character to frenetic pacing, and the film exudes a kind of sweetness that never threatens to become either sticky or synthetic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a worthy successor to Chinatown - full of ecological and geological insights into Los Angeles history that recall Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald and give a view of southern California that could have been conceived only by a native.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Among the pleasures to be found here are some amusing sidelong glances at how movies get made and the singing talent of Streep as well as MacLaine. There's not much depth here, but Nichols does a fine job with the surface effects, and the wisecracks keep coming.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The concept itself is so strong - particularly as a revenge fantasy for anyone who's ever resented hypocritical exploitative shrinks - that it winds up working pretty well anyway.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This movie has its share of laughs, but it's also Ron Howard's most personal film, and clearly his most ambitious--a multifaceted essay in fictional form about the diverse snares of child rearing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast - including Derek Jacobi as the modern-dress chorus, Paul Scofield, Judi Dench, Ian Holm, Emma Thompson, and Robbie Coltrane in an effective cameo as Falstaff - is uniformly fine without any grandstanding.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film has a fresh and imaginative feel for period detail that the talented cast - which also features Gabriel Byrne, Christian Bale, Eric Stoltz, John Neville, and Mary Wickes - obviously benefits from.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is full of relevant insights into the kinds of compromises, trade-offs, and combinations of skills and personalities that produce media, and the personal stories are deftly integrated.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a fairly accomplished first feature -perky, visually inventive, and unusually nast
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In many respects this is a black counterpart to The Naked Gun, and very nearly as funny; the bounty of antimacho gags is both unexpected and refreshing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Terry Gilliam's third fantasy feature (1989) may not achieve all it reaches for, but it goes beyond Time Bandits and Brazil in its play with space and time, and as a children's picture offers a fresh and exciting alternative to the Disney stranglehold on the market.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What this movie has going for itself in spite of its cloying pleas for indulgence is a playful and interesting narrative structure that precludes much development and comes to the fore only toward the end. The whole thing may drive you batty, but as with "Rushmore," the melancholy aftertaste lingers.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A powerful Christian parable, painful but illuminating, about crime and redemption.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The portrait of Carter has been described as hagiography, but it isn't a stretch to view his quiet integrity as saintly next to the track records of his successors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Hysterically hyperbolic and unpleasant if still witty dissection of family traumas.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Danny Glover, as hard-rock reliable as Spencer Tracy in his prime, plays onetime pianist Tyrone "Pine Top" Purvis.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well-crafted if relatively impersonal adaptation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2006 drama may seem to be worlds apart from the surreal theme-park setting of Jia's previous film, "The World," but there are similarities of theme, style, scale, and tone: social and romantic alienation in a monumental setting, a daring poetic mix of realism and lyrical fantasy, and an uncanny sense of where our planet is drifting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie is dominated by Maddin's usual black-and-white photography, silent-movie syntax, and deadpan melodrama.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is made up chiefly of found footage and therefore lacks the mise en scene of its predecessors, but it has the added benefit of Davies's voice-over narration, which, thanks to his training and experience as an actor, is enormously powerful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Beautiful and challenging documentary.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pivots on the characters' racism and xenophobia, playing tricks with our own biases and ultimately justifying an extravagant array of coincidences and surprises.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Baumbach's best trait as a filmmaker remains his handling of actors.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Leigh displays a passionate affection for and commitment to his leading characters that never precludes a critical distance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is only superficially superficial, and it grows in meaning and resonance as it progresses.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A nervy as well as somber piece of work, not only for the way it confounds and even frustrates certain genre expectations, but also -- and especially -- for the way it confronts the viewer with the moral implications of that frustration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Prior to its hyperbolic final act, this is one of Robert Altman's most skillful and least bombastic features in some time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Both actors are so good that one might easily overlook the Pollyannaish subplot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is possibly the funniest lesbian romp since "Go Fish."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Funnier than "Pecker" but a far cry from the best of Waters's Divine movies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has memorable characters and images. Yet the story is elusive and occasionally puzzling, and some of the ideas are amorphous and self-conscious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable enough on its own terms.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An eye-opening tale of how part of our population lives, and as an authentic image of material suffering it makes something like Lars von Trier's "Dancer in the Dark" seem even more dubious.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Everything seems to fall into place according to earlier Egoyan films, which suggests that you're likelier to enjoy this one if you haven't seen the others.

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