Jonathan Rosenbaum

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For 1,529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Manchurian Candidate
Lowest review score: 0 Bamboozled
Score distribution:
1529 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Masterfully charted and adeptly played, but also rather minimalist.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The thriller plot, while serviceable, registers as somewhat gratuitous, but the Buenos Aires locations are nicely used.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from some softening of the extreme violence (through manipulations on the sound track) and some fancy intercutting, this is every bit as unpleasant as Olmos can make it, but occasionally edifying as well.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is good, solid work that never achieves either the art or poignance of Van Sant's earlier and more personal projects.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    They're all instructive and interesting in one way or another, and they're indispensable viewing for residents of isolationist, or at least isolated, countries such as this one.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Agnieszka Holland (Europa Europa, The Secret Garden) directs with obvious feeling rather than cynicism, and I was swept away by it despite the story's anachronisms.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Definitely worth checking out.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The storytelling is so masterful that Hattendorf doesn't have to spell out the striking parallels between the persecution of Japanese after Pearl Harbor and the harassment of Muslims after 9/11.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Coppola does a fair job of capturing the fish-tank ambience of nocturnal, upscale Tokyo and showing how it feels to be a stranger in that world, and an excellent job of getting the most from her lead actors. Unfortunately, I'm not sure she accomplishes anything else.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The story has its corny aspects, but thanks to Scott's skill as an image maker and as a storyteller--proceeding from the very blue and very abstract water seen behind the credits to the climactic, extended storm--this is superior to both "Dead Poets Society" (as a tale about a boys' school and its charismatic teacher) and "Apollo 13" (as a true-life action adventure).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given recent similar incidents of young con artists posing as journalists, this is a timely and compelling film, but I wish the filmmakers had widened their focus to address the kinds of journalistic corruption that go beyond simple fibbing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Less suspenseful than the original but more ethically nuanced, politically pointed, and violent.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    "Bill & Ted's Aurora Adventures" might almost serve as the subtitle for this very silly but enjoyable 1992 comedy, developed from characters introduced on Saturday Night Live--heavy-metal fans (Mike Myers and Dana Carvey) with a cable access show in Aurora, Illinois.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its giddy stylistics include extravagant use of color and rapid montage, which are said to be a direct homage to legendary Thai independent Ratana Pestonji.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fortunately almost everyone acquits himself coolly and admirably; only costars Greg Kinnear and Marcia Gay Harden ham it up.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pretty good job of zipping things along and occasionally scaring us, and the digital effects are fun.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This first feature by novelist and psychologist Jeremy Leven has a fairly rudimentary mise en scene, but the actors take over the proceedings with aplomb, and Brando and Dunaway have the grace to turn much of the show over to Depp, who carries the burden with ease.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie can't explain as much as it wants to about what makes (and unmakes) a skinhead, but it carries us a fair distance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What emerges is a speculative, critical essay about the 60s, weighted down in spots by political correctness and a conflicted desire to mock Dylan's denseness while catering to his hardcore fans, but otherwise lively, fluid, and watchable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're sick of kinky killers and English rip-offs of American genre movies, this terminally bleak and violent 1995 road movie may irritate the hell out of you--unless you're as impressed as I was by Amanda Plummer's performance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are plenty of laughs whenever Moore wants to twist the knife, but the bottom line is that he respects and trusts his fellow Americans a lot more than Bush does.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was beguiled by both the eerie moods and the striking compositions, which incorporate large stretches of empty space.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This effective, well-paced antimilitary thriller has more conflicting flashbacks than you can shake a stick at.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    None of the characters ever rises beyond the level of his or her generic functions, and by the end the overall emptiness of the conception becomes fully apparent.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Perhaps the most formally ravishing-as well as the most morally and ideologically problematic-film ever directed by Martin Scorsese. (Review of Original Release).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provocative documentary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you ever suspected that assholes are running the world, this documentary adapting producer and former actor Robert Evans's autobiography, narrated with relish by Evans himself--the cinematic equivalent of a Vanity Fair article, complete with tuxes and swimming pools--offers all the confirmation you'll ever need.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are fewer jokes this time around, and Moore makes a point of not even appearing on-screen for a good 40 minutes, putting more emphasis on his arguments and less on his comic persona.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're up for good nihilist entertainment, look no further.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is very much the work of a cinephile, calling to mind such middle-period Orson Welles jumbles as "The Lady From Shanghai" and "Mr. Arkadin" as well as dozens of other movies I only half remember, a familiarity that's essential to its charm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As Martel points out, the movie is about the "difficulties" and "dangers" of "differentiating good from evil," and it requires as well as rewards a fair amount of alertness from the viewer.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite some shaky narrative continuity and muddled motivations, this manages to move pretty briskly, and the action sequences are generally well handled, especially at the climax.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Rodriguez has a sure sense of scale and pacing as well as an artisan's relaxed control of the material.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The mixture of sincerity and sitcom phoniness is bewildering at times, but on some level, I guess, the film works.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The result is a step toward multiculturalism and ecological correctness, though not without a certain amount of confusion. The movie is not quite as entertaining as "The Little Mermaid" or "Beauty and the Beast."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    So keenly felt and so deeply imagined I couldn't help but be moved, even grateful for its bleeding-heart nostalgia.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Made for the BBC, this travelogue of America's southern backwoods is both blessed and cursed by its fascination with the colorful--lively alt-country sounds and fancy word spinners like novelist Harry Crews.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from Swinton's fine performance, what largely distinguishes this is Brougher's sharp narrative focus.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite a continuity problem or two, this is one of those rare contemporary romantic comedies that actually work.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But with all due respect to Smith, the movie--a performance piece with an unbelievable bare-bones plot--belongs to Kevin James.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Set on the French Riviera, the movie has the kind of plot that cries out for the stylish treatment that a Billy Wilder could bring to it; without it, the various twists seem needlessly spun out and implausible, although Martin is allowed to show off his brand of very physical comedy to some advantage, and Miles Goodman contributes a pleasant score.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Betty Thomas, directing a script by TV veteran Jeff Lowell, seems uncertain whether to sympathize with her three heroines or with the title cad, but there's something mildly charming about this cheerful revenge comedy's lack of any straightforward moral agenda.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Only about half of the disconnected gags and oddball conceits pay off, but their gleeful delivery takes up most of the slack.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Most of what transpires is low-key, affectionate comedy and a fair amount of fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're wondering how Steve Anderson managed to make a 93-minute documentary about the ultimate four-letter word, which uses the epithet over 800 times, you're underestimating his capacity to entertain and educate in roughly equal doses.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore make an appealing couple in this silly but very likable 1998 romantic comedy set in 1985.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The three parts add up to a rather lumpy narrative, and the characters are perceived through a kind of affectionate recollection that tends to idealize them, but they're so beautifully realized that they linger like cherished friends.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As in other Ivory-Jhabvala adaptations, ritzy consumerism is very much on display, but what makes this better than most is Johnson's amused admiration for nearly all her characters, regardless of nationality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This farce eventually runs out of steam, devolving into a protracted docudrama about actor Steve Coogan (who plays the title hero as well as his father), but until then this is a pretty clever piece of jive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though the filmmaking isn't everything it might have been (the opening montage is especially clumsy), their argument is compelling, absorbing, and urgent.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In contrast to the clueless media cliches about suicide bombers, this offers a comprehensive and comprehending portrait of what helps to produce them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    He resisted commodification by continuously reediting his other films and reworking his live performances--a dazzling legacy that influenced everyone from Warhol to Fellini to John Waters. In some ways Smith's art became commodified only after he died and his estranged sister gained control over his work, though that did lead to this documentary, a fascinating introduction to his special world.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Before this turns to total mush, it's a quirky, fitfully effective fantasy periodically enlivened by the cast.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The depictions of novelist Harper Lee (Catherine Keener) and editor William Shawn (Bob Balaban) aren't convincing, but Miller is mainly interested in Capote's identification and duplicitous relationship with Perry Smith, one of the murderers he was writing about, and that story rings true.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not quite up to "Airplane!" or "Top Secret!," but there are still laughs aplenty.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An eye-opening tale of how part of our population lives, and as an authentic image of material suffering it makes something like Lars von Trier's "Dancer in the Dark" seem even more dubious.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The landscapes--which come close to outshining the worthy actors in the opening and closing stretches--are beautiful, and the plot, which is basically a grim coming-of-age story, holds one's interest throughout.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The CGI characters seem less like artwork than humans wearing animal suits, but despite the overall ugliness and sitcom timing, this has enough action, violence, and invention to keep kids amused.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Big Lebowski is packed with show-offy filmmaking and as a result is pretty entertaining.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The inventive performances -- keep this story interesting in spite of its puritanical framework.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's not much story here, but the characters are substantial: a single mother (nicely played by Juliette Binoche) who runs a local avant-garde puppet theater and is preoccupied with such matters as a downstairs tenant who refuses to pay rent or leave, her neglected but mainly cheerful son, and his Taiwanese nanny, a filmmaker in her spare time.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A caustic satire masquerading as an action-adventure. Or maybe it's Hollywood escapism masquerading as satire.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    You won't come out of it indifferent, and even if it winds up enraging you (I could have done without most of the ending myself), it nonetheless commands attention.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The opening half-hour--the burglary of a jewelry store, filmed in meticulous detail--is as good as its inspiration in The Asphalt Jungle, but the film turns moralistic and sour in the last half, when the thieves fall out.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A corny but sincere weeper written by Jonathan Marc Feldman, directed by Thomas Carter, and shot mainly in Prague.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The postmodernist evocations of the past (roughly the 50s through the 80s) are a charming mishmash, delivered with wit and style.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It reminded me of "Pump Up the Volume" in many ways.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What eventually emerges isn't nearly as achieved or convincing as the neighborhood portrait, but even when it ultimately overwhelms the characters, it's full of juice, humor, and nuance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Satisfying in a purely infantile way, and the familiarity of everything is oddly comforting. In terms of action, moreover, this makes "The Matrix Reloaded" look like a clodhopper's jamboree.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A nervy as well as somber piece of work, not only for the way it confounds and even frustrates certain genre expectations, but also -- and especially -- for the way it confronts the viewer with the moral implications of that frustration.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A somewhat adolescent if stylish antiauthoritarian romp about an irreverent U.S. medical unit during the Korean war
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Morrow and his collaborators so clearly believe in this project that I was carried along, often charmed and never bored.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The actors keep this interesting, but as a story it drifts and rambles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like the painter, it's painstakingly serious about what it's up to.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fair amount of grit and charm.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It still holds up as splashy fun of a sort, if you can handle its sexual politics and its depictions of Native Americans.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I found it pretty entertaining, as well as provocative in some of its comments about contemporary life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I've never read Stella Gibbons's popular English novel of 1932--a parody of the romantic rural novels that Mary Webb wrote during the 20s--but director John Schlesinger and adapter Malcolm Bradbury have gotten plenty of enjoyable mileage out of it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even though he's psychologically expanded his source, the material is a bit too schematic to work as much more than a scaled-down thriller.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Drawn from a children's book by Croatian illustrator Milan Trenc, this fantasy isn't exactly heavy, but its ideological implications are interesting nevertheless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It abjectly collapses into feel-good nonsense.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jarmusch's narrative setups are often artificial and implausible, but his stories are usually charming anyway because the sense of character runs deeper than plot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provides a valuable refresher course in our less-acknowledged methods of meddling in the affairs of other countries.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's far more ambitious than its predecessor and suffers from too many ideas rather than too few, making it an inspired, fascinating, and revealing mess.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2004 French feature seems concerned not so much with the psychopathology of everyday life as with psychopaths who lurk behind the everyday.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's confusing yet ultimately illuminating is the way his gremlins function as a free-floating metaphor, suggesting at separate junctures everything from teenagers to blacks to various Freudian suppressions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Based on a true story, the movie was nominated for an Oscar as best foreign film; some might castigate its unabashed sentimentality, but I found myself moved, especially when I recalled that this was supposedly the war to end all wars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is somewhat fuzzy as narrative, but it's a potent mood piece, and its portait of urban loneliness has some of the intensity of "Taxi Driver" without the violence.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The third remake of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956) may not be a patch on the original, but it does have a few things the other versions lack.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is equally good in handling the discrepancy between skilled and unskilled parents.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Moss has an acute feeling for structure and juxtaposition and for the quality and sensibility of his friends.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nothing miraculous, but it's time pretty well spent.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Neve Campbell, who cowrote the story with scenarist Barbara Turner, plays one of the dancers; although her character isn't especially interesting, her story furnishes a minimal narrative thread to hold the rest together.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The humor is a bit dry for my taste, but director Bent Hamer and his actors know what they're doing every step of the way.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This has loads of swagger, but for stylistic audacity I prefer Anderson's more scattershot "Magnolia."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    High-octane nonsense but gives both the actors and the audience all that's needed to make this diverting--car chases, wisecracks, narrow escapes, explosions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Ron Underwood (Tremors) does a fair job navigating all the key changes proposed by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel's script, and with the actors' help he makes this a diverting if bumpy ride.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite all the silliness the drift races are gripping, and director Justin Lin captures Tokyo's energy and glitter far better than Sofia Coppola.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The title modifies a term coined by political scientist and philosopher Arthur Bentley that refers to the interactions between people and their environment, and the notion of a shifting center is what gives this experiment much of its interest and also limits it from going very far in any single direction.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sheer neurotic intensity of Techine's characters--characteristically stretching both backward and forward in time, as in a Faulkner novel--holds one throughout, as does Techine's masterful direction and many of the other performances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's something self-defeating about approaching an unconventional artist so conventionally, and the story becomes touching only insofar as it overrides much of what made Duras special.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The light ribbing of conspicuous consumption in southern California and the Simon and Garfunkel songs on the sound track both play considerable roles in giving this depthless comedy some bounce. [Review of re-release]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The economy of both script and direction is admirable—there's no wasted motion in sight—though the film's anthology of genre cliches ultimately undermines Bates's heroic efforts to make it something more.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In her third feature Nicole Holofcener leapfrogs between characters with wit and grace, gathering them in various clusters and adroitly showing how money or the lack thereof really does inflect their lives and interactions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film isn't averse to reaching for Hollywood fantasies, but there's a lot of what seems to be hard-earned wisdom here about women in bad marriages.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The real revelation here is Streep, who spends every moment comically negotiating her conflicted impulses.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Bryan Barber (known for his music videos) and his cast display so much gusto that it's hard to keep up your resistance--I wound up finding this more enjoyable than the Oscar-bestrewn "Chicago."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can't say I remembered this 1995 feature too clearly a couple of days later; but I certainly had a good time as I watched it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One reason Bright Leaves is McElwee's best film since "Sherman's March" is the richness of his reflections on this multifaceted material.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you can figure out all the intricate and incestuous family backstory of this domestic melodrama by Claude Chabrol, there's a certain amount to appreciate, though most of this is more cerebral than emotional.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I value the flawed Tic Code over a good many relatively flawless features because it has more heart, more life, and more spunk.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brooks's sweetness, innocence, and boundless love of the infantile inform everything from the brassy production numbers (capped by an homage to Jailhouse Rock) to the final credits.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Terse and fatalistic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Some of Roth's cars become characters, their voices furnished by Ann-Margret, Jay Leno, Brian Wilson, Matt Groening, Tom Wolfe, and others. The pace never flags, and the enthusiasm is infectious.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The humor about male neurosis doesn't try to remind you of Woody Allen at every turn.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's much more of an action flick than either "Metropolis" or "Blade Runner," but there's a provocative and visionary side to this free adaptation of Isaac Asimov's SF classic that puts it in the same thoughtful canon.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Contradictions confound certain aspects of this project--such as the language spoken by Pocahontas (which, in the Hollywood tradition, oscillates between tribal talk and the unaccented chatter of a contemporary Valley girl)--but overall this seems like a reasonable stab at an impossible agenda.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The general idea is to exploit a certain amount of role reversal, and Reginald Hudlin, who directed "House Party," does a fairly good job of making this fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The result is somewhat better than a Masterpiece Theatre gloss job, but it's far from the essence of Woolf.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film raises many interesting questions about our own responses, but it may finally be too open-ended for its own good.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The filmmakers aren't exactly cruel, but they focus on compulsion rather than passion, which by implication tends to tarnish the more intellectual and scholarly members of the breed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Shot during the March 2003 invasion and the early stages of the American occupation, it tells us more about how the channel decides what to report than we probably know about most American newscasts.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Without ever posing a serious challenge to the original, the new Nutty Professor is much more respectful of its source and funnier than I'd anticipated.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The last and best of his "Tales of the Four Seasons."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Searing drama that uses the police procedural to explore the moral and psychological devastation of the Iraq war for U.S. soldiers (and, incidentally, for Iraqi citizens).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This curious ecological parable was directed by George Miller (Babe: Pig in the City), who still has an eye and a sense of humor but on this particular outing can't get the script he wrote with three others to make much sense.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Jonathan Demme's farcical and broad 1988 comedy, written by Barry Strugatz and Mark R. Burns, doesn't really work, but there are plenty of enjoyable compensations.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's some excellent comedy early on involving the mutual incomprehension of Africans and Americans, though this eventually gives way to solemn, ethnocentric mush about one African's reading of the story of Jesus, demonstrating as usual that sustained subtlety is hardly Spielberg's forte.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lacks the scariness, the mystery, and even much of the curiosity of Rivette's better work.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The script by producer David Franzoni, John Logan, and William Nicholson is serviceable but not exactly inspired.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Wears its art, as well as its heart, on its sleeve -- so much so that I feel guilty for not liking it more.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Storper is pretty good at playing with and against certain western cliches in his treatment of the good guys (including Annette Bening's character), but resorts to pure cliche when it comes to the villians (e.g., Gambon and James Russo).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A mainly routine Hong Kong action film from fleet and floppy-haired action hero Jackie Chan. It's light on plot and character, but the stunts are well staged.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Foreigners who argue that Americans are Neanderthal savages can point to this movie as persuasive evidence.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If the Disney animated original (1961) -- adapted from Dodie Smith's novel -- tried to approximate live action, this 1996 Disney live-action remake often tries to evoke cartoon.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Formulaic but fairly well-done.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unafraid to look absurd but lacks the self-conviction needed to come off as camp.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Enjoyable but thin.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Juliette Lewis plays the out-of-town girl Depp takes a shine to once he starts getting tired of the married woman (Mary Steenburgen) he's involved with, and while the picture is too absentminded to explain what it is that makes Lewis move in and out of town, she and Depp make a swell couple. There are other rough edges as far as plot is concerned, but I liked this.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The eroticism is powerful, and the documentary candor and directness of the sex scenes make this well worth seeing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The efforts to plant this story in a contemporary vernacular are not always successful but the performances are uniformly fine in their adherence to the material, and consistently avoid any vulgarity or showboating.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Carax has a wonderful cinematic eye and a personal feeling for editing rhythms, and his sense of overripeness and excess virtually defines him.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't see this slightly better-than-average drug thriller, with slightly better-than-average direction by Steven Soderbergh, as anything more than a routine rubber-stamping of genre reflexes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This held me, but I was grateful when it released me.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ron Howard, an exemplar of honorable mediocrity, reunites with actor Russell Crowe and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman of "A Beautiful Mind" for this epic treatment of a seven-year stretch (1928-'35) in the career of New Jersey boxer James J. Braddock.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Very slickly and glibly put together, with a sharp eye for yuppie decor and accoutrements; even Woody's habitual, fanciful vision of an all-white New York is respected.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I guess one out of three ain't bad.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're looking to be romantically captivated, this movie just might do the job.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are still plenty of laughs and some inventiveness along the way...although some of the gags and contrived plot moves stumble over their own cuteness.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As old-fashioned movie fun, this isn't bad, even -- especially? -- when it skirts the edge of silliness, and it's better than the 1960 George Pal version.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The result is grimly "effective," but it made me long for Hollywood junk.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    You won't be too bored.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie is about the interactions between these characters, and though I'm still trying to figure out what all the pieces mean, there's no way I can shake off the experience.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I found it more pleasurable as a time waster than either "Mission: Impossible."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At some point in this endless thriller the suspense turns into an extremely unpleasant ordeal that Dahl doesn't know when to stop.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though its ending feels protracted--especially the climactic chase--it kept me reasonably distracted.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On a mindless exploitation level this is pretty good, but on other levels it seems to make promises that it fails to deliver on; none of the deaths carries any moral weight, and the climactic special-effects free-for-all tends to drown out all other interests.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For torture and violence freaks, every clank and thud is duly and hyperbolically registered.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main novelty of this conventional, slight, but charming youth picture is that it's English and therefore more class-conscious than most American equivalents.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Half-funny mockumentary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If Wahlberg in a beret is your idea of fun, don't let me get in your way.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Remains mired in a smart-alecky film-school sensibility.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's full of pain and quirky characters standing at oblique angles to one another, and while it doesn't add up it held me throughout.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A quirky, lyrical independent feature by writer-director Michael Almereyda. It's shot in luscious, shimmering black and white.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This meticulous but ultimately rather pedestrian drama gradually won me over as a minor if watchable example of the "victory through defeat" brand of military heroism that John Ford specialized in.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are times when this leisurely movie seems so much in love with its own virtue and nobility that there's not much room left for the spectator.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's full of scenic splendors with a fine sense of scale, but its narrative thrust seems relatively pro forma, and I was bored by the battle scenes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The tragic and highly "symbolic" death toward the end, which is supposed to illustrate the sins of the parents being visited upon their children, barely resonates at all, because most of the insights are strictly incidental. The film elicits guilty, lascivious chuckles, not analysis.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its virtues are still genuine and durable enough to resist the blandishments of hype.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I enjoyed the invented trailers the directors fold into the mix, but despite the jokey "missing reels," these two full-length features are each 20 minutes longer than they need to be, and neither one makes much sense as narrative.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It has plenty of visual sweep, fine action sequences, and, thanks especially to Brad Pitt (as Achilles) and Peter O'Toole (as King Priam), a deeper sense of character than one might expect from a sword-and-sandal epic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Missing is most of Tarkovsky's contemplative and mystical poetry (which is why it's 90 minutes shorter), and added are some unfortunate Hollywood-style designer flashbacks -- The story is still strong and haunting, but I'd recommend seeing this, if at all, only after the Tarkovsky.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The characters' behavior isn't always believable, and the jerky rhythm takes some getting used to (there may be more attitude here than observation). But the defiant absence of any conventional plot has a cumulative charm.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On the very edge of coherence -- but I find its decadent erotic poetry irresistible.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe I've seen too many James Bond movies by now, or maybe the trouble with this 20th installment is that the filmmakers are trying too hard to top the excesses of the predecessors.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Takes a while to arrive at what it has to say, but some of the performances kept me occupied in the meantime.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film asks us to embrace not only the death of beauty but the beauty of death.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The charm of the three leads makes it a movie worth seeing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable if far-fetched movie is seriously marred by its three leads; only Garrel manages to suggest a person rather than a fashion model dutifully following instructions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While its slender plot (stripper Karina wants a baby and turns to Belmondo when her boyfriend Brialy won't oblige her) can irritate in spots, the film's high spirits may still win you over.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sam Raimi tries to do a Sergio Leone, and though this 1995 feature is highly enjoyable in spots, it doesn't come across as very convincing, perhaps because nothing can turn Sharon Stone into Charles Bronson.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An Austin Powers movie for grown-ups.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is mainly the girl's story, though the numerous southern archetypes out of Tennessee Williams and Carson McCullers (who's explicitly referenced) keep threatening to overwhelm her.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I seem to be in a distinct minority in finding the satire toothless, obvious, and insufferably glib -- Still, I found genuine pleasure in watching Catherine Zeta-Jones, Renee Zellweger, Richard Gere, and John C. Reilly try their hands at singing and dancing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The actors are brilliant, the dialogue extremely clever, and the direction assured. But by the end I couldn't have cared less about any of the characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This one's slightly better than average these days, which means slightly diverting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pretty good chronicle of a certain phase of French working-class life.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Falk throws himself into the part and almost single-handedly enables this comedy drama to transcend some of its sitcom limitations.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A seemingly mad dog periodically turns into a well-trained pet.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you like Ryan and Robbins as much as I do, you'll probably feel indulgent and even charmed in spots; if you don't, you'll probably run screaming out of the theater.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like "The Hustler," this absorbing Las Vegas story about a professional poker player (Eric Bana) uses gambling to tell a tale of moral regeneration. But Bana can't carry a picture like Paul Newman, and poker proves less photogenic than pool.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This arty and moody account of her formation as an artist, as its subtitle declares, is basically invented. Its nerviness only pays off in a few details and in Nicole Kidman's resourcefulness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are easy to watch, though awfully familiar and simpleminded.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    8MM
    I can't say I warmed to the results, but I was solidly held for the film's two hours.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If, like the filmmakers, you're willing to settle for a myth that flatters your sensibilities and shortchanges the past, you're likely to find some agreeable kicks here.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances are strong, but the spectator often feels adrift in an overly busy intrigue.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you like being shaken up and don't care too much why or how, this is probably for you; Huppert gives her all to the part, and you won't be bored.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alas, most of the surprise and the wit to be found here ends with the title.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As soon as it became clear that this remake has nothing to do with real Georgia moonshiners and everything to do with car chases, smashups, and explosions, I could sit back and enjoy it as good, stupid fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Griffith's talent, energy, and sexiness give it some drive and punch.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like Fellini's "I vitelloni," this Spanish-French-Italian coproduction is a bittersweet epic about frustration and relative inertia, though with a somewhat older and wiser group of layabouts.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    My only reason to recommend this movie is that there's nothing quite like it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances of both Schwarzenegger and O'Brien are labored, the pacing uneven, and maybe only half the gags work, but there's a certain amount of creative energy and audacity mixed in with all the confusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is fairly efficient if you can square efficiency with being twice as long as necessary and overly familiar to boot; at least Jackson and Spacey keep it afloat.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pleasant, inoffensive, and (quite properly) mindless diversion.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    George Lucas produced and Jim Henson (of Muppets fame) directed this heftily budgeted 1986 fantasy, which seems to be a conscious attempt to play on the female coming-of-age themes of classic fairy tales.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Friedkin does a superb job of serving up the well-appointed script by James Webb and Stephen Gaghan.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ali
    What's lacking here is a sustained thematic focus -- at least five people worked on the script, including Mann, which may account for the absence of a clear through line -- though the spectacle and characters keep one absorbed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This has its moments, but don't expect many fresh insights.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is brisk and fun to watch, thanks to the actors...But once you catch the main drift of the plot, it becomes awfully ho-hum.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Diverting, energetic, and even reasonably satisfying, so long as you aren't looking for a real musical to take its place.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Coens do an efficient job of stamping their signature grotesquerie on sumptuous Beverly Hills and Las Vegas settings and ladling on gallows humor and malice, sometimes with the verve of early Robert Zemeckis.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The overall feel is phantasmagoric--pitched, like most of Maddin's work, in the style of a half-remembered late silent feature or early talkie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sincere, capable, at times moving, but overextended, this picture is seriously hampered by its tendency to linger over everything--especially landscapes with silhouetted figures, and not excluding its own good intentions.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not at all bad for a toy commercial.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Individually these elements are powerful, but they fail to mesh or collide with one another in any satisfying way, and the movie's score only exacerbates the problem.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can't yet decide whether the film works or not, but it certainly held me for its full two hours.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's slight but likable, and diverting enough as light entertainment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To call this "Farrelly brothers lite" may be a little redundant, but aside from the odd vomit gag, it goes relatively easy on their usual working-class taboo busting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Writer-director Alan Rudolph has been remaking his own romantic comedy-dramas for so long now that even when he gives us two couples instead of one or substitutes Montreal for Seattle--both of which he does here--the film still comes out feeling the same.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If one discounts the facile and unconvincing ending, this first feature by Guka Omarova, offers a convincingly bleak view of how a 15-year-old boy could get ahead in rural Kazakhstan in the early 90s.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is stronger in terms of characters (male ones, that is) than in terms of story or mise en scene, but the actorskeep this pretty watchable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Enjoyably campy hokum.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a story worth telling, though once the participants and the filmmakers start basking in their virtue, the material begins to feel overextended.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast is OK, and LaBute still has an eye, but the uses they're put to seem contrived and arty.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Too bad the overreaching script has to go after effects recalling "Alien," but as a stylistic exercise this still has its chills.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    According to common usage, the French word stupide comes closer to silly than to dumb, which is how I might rationalize my affection for this harebrained, obvious, but euphoric tale.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Broder's script makes the weird transition from satire to camp as if there were no distinction between the two. It's a bracing if at times bewildering experience.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    So visually striking, so compulsively watchable as storytelling, and so personal even in its enigmas that I found it much more pleasurable than any of the Hollywood genre films I've seen lately.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thornton seems born to play the sort of slow-witted poet of the mundane that the Coens find worthy of their condescending affection.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This obsessive movie, awarded the grand jury prize at the Sundance festival, may not quite live up to its advance billing; the subject is powerful, but the filmmaking often seems slapdash, and the final half hour dithers.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is the apotheosis of Classics Illustrated filmmaking, aiming at nothing more than tasteful reduction, and the fact that it's done so well here doesn't mean that it's necessarily worth doing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from some unexaggerated notations about American puritanism in the 1940s and '50s, this is more a work of exploration than a thesis, and Condon mainly avoids sensationalism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though this drifts at times as storytelling, it's mainly lightweight but personable fun.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you don't care about such motivations, this is a pretty good thriller, though not one you're likely to remember for very long.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Full of high spirits and good vibes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sincerity of their performances (Lopez and Caviezel) overrides the intermittent implausibilities of Gerald Dipego's script.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Quentin Tarantino's lively and show-offy tribute to Asian martial-arts flicks, bloody anime, and spaghetti westerns he soaked up as a teenager is even more gory and adolescent than its models, which explains both the fun and the unpleasantness of this globe-trotting romp.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are watchable enough--sometimes funny, sometimes over the top--and fairly fresh, though also a bit calculated.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pretty familiar stuff, but the performances--by Adrien Brody, Elise Neal, Simon Baker-Denny, and Lauryn Hill--are relatively fresh and sincere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Singleton shows some genuine talent in handling character and action, and equal amounts of confusion and attitude when it comes to matters of gender and ghetto politics.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This keeps one reasonably amused, titillated, and brain-dead for a little over two hours.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Narrative continuity and momentum have never been among Hopper's strong points, and this time the choppiness of the storytelling diffuses the dramatic impact without offering a shapely mosaic effect (as in [his] previous films) to compensate for it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The dissection of Edwardian repression never gets beyond the dutiful, tasteful obviousness of a BBC miniseries.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Overall it's what it aspires to be--a pleasant time-waster.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Perhaps the post-cold-war attitudes behind this film are progressive, but the same old pre-nuclear-war worship of the military goes all but unchallenged.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Stylistically lively and generally well acted. Thematically, however, it's somewhat incoherent.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Norbu tries too hard to please and charm, but his film at least carries the advantages of unactorly faces and a premise based on actual events that dramatizes the issue of religious vocation in a secular world.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfortunately, once the freshness of the concept wears off, the same premise starts to feel mechanical and willful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Noah Baumbach collaborated on the arch script, whose bittersweet weirdness leaves a residue even as the narrative disintegrates.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This thriller is effective if you can accept that--as with some of John Dickson Carr's locked-room mysteries--the trickiness counts more than any plausibility.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The filmmakers have lovingly retained and expanded on that film's only flaws, some implausible plot details. But even without the same cultural significance, it's still a good story, and the interesting cast.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    All the virtues of the original... are present here, though when Cameron tries to milk some sentiment out of the "personality" and fate of his top machine he comes up flat and empty, and the other characters are scarcely more interesting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Everyone who likes this movie calls it "disturbing," but what disturbs me most is the self-loathing laughter it provokes, similar to what one often hears at Woody Allen and Michael Moore comedies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The leads work overtime to make their characters and their relationships pungent, believable, and moving (though with regard to the rest of the cast, the movie seems less focused and confident).
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Breillat may be serious about creating period ambience, but she also can't resist patterning her heroine after Marlene Dietrich's Concha in "The Devil Is a Woman" (even though Argento sometimes suggests Maria Montez in the pleasure she takes in her own company).
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you don't mind the telegraphed punches of Ruth Epstein's script and Harvey Kahn's direction, this should carry you along.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not quite a thriller and not quite a character study, though with elements of both, the film is limited by its ambiguous relation to history.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Script and direction are both fairly slapdash, but the actors and the overall sweetness keep this chugging along on some level .
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was engaged by Chick's characters...But that point passed pretty soon after the credits rolled, and nothing has come back to haunt me since.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 1998 film held my interest for two hours, even taking on an epic feel when it turns into a road movie. It's not bad by any means, but it also happens to resemble a lot of other movies.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provides an interesting introduction to a compelling figure in contemporary pop music.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Aiming at a microcosm of American life comparable in some ways to Do the Right Thing, Singleton can't quite justify or explicate his parting message ("unlearn"), but his passion is exemplary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The banal score seems more appropriate for a western, and there's a certain self-conscious theatricality in the mise en scene, yet this is both handsome and affecting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Silly and shameless stuff that made me laugh quite a lot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A strong example of the cinema verite style at work, yet few films of the school show up the crisis of its "noninvolvement" policy more tellingly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given how bogus the movie is whenever it departs from formula, it's not surprising that the funniest bit (in which Peter Parker becomes a disco smoothie) is stolen from Jerry Lewis's "The Nutty Professor" or that the best special effects, involving a gigantic Sandman, dimly echo "King Kong."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Coolidge directs as if the characters were believable human beings--at least until she gets to the end, when Hollywood and fairy-tale conventions have to triumph over humanity and common sense.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is mildly entertaining, though like the puzzles themselves, it favors diversion over wisdom.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Led me to second thoughts about whether the feel-good tactics of "Schindler's List" were any worse than the feel-bad tactics on display here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sacrifices compelling drama for gratuitous whimsy and big-budget spectacle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Denzel Washington's directorial debut reminds me of a 60s British movie called "The Mark": it's liberal minded, heartwarming, sincere, and consequently somewhat old-fashioned and stodgy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The characters are so full-bodied and the feelings so raw and complex that I'd call this the best thing he's (Singleton) done to date.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Bridges and Allen are so bracingly good that you're encouraged to overlook how manipulative the proceedings are.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The larger considerations and film noir overtones detract too much from the facts of the case, and what emerges are two effective half-films, each partially at odds with the other.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Binoche is especially effective playing a character that seems to have as many layers as her makeup.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As a literary bodice ripper this is better than average, partly because of its glimpses of early-19th-century bohemianism in France and Italy but mostly because Juliette Binoche and Benoit Magimel manage to keep the story hot and unpredictable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe you'll enjoy it, but don't expect to remember it ten minutes later, or even to believe in the characters while you're watching them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Considering that none of the characters is fresh or interesting, it's a commendable achievement that the quality of the storytelling alone keeps the movie watchable and likable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This adaptation of Patricia Highsmith's novel is commercial to the core.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It reeks of unearned profundity, but I found it entertaining.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Slapdash but good-natured romantic comedy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The script dawdles, and in spite of a good cast--Bill Paxton, Billy Bob Thornton (who's especially resourceful), Bridget Fonda, and Brent Briscoe--the movie tends to amble around its points rather than drive straight toward the heart of the matter.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The unvarnished quality of some of the acting limits this effort in spots, but the quirky originality of the story, characters, and filmmaking keeps one alert and curious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This thriller is a lot better than you might expect--especially for a Kevin Costner vehicle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Strictly routine as filmmaking, adhering fairly consistently to the sound-bite approach. But given the subject, there's still a great deal of interest here about the life, art, milieu, and political activity of Ginsberg. (Review of Original Release)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's really fun about this silly but spirited comedy isn't just the ribbing of "swinging London" fashion and social attitudes but the use of the compulsive zooms and split-screen mosaics of commercial movies of the 60s.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well-acted drama.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brad Pitt has fun with his secondary part as a pontificating lunatic, but I wish I'd enjoyed the rest of the cast more.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    All in all, an entertaining (if ideologically incoherent) response to the valorization of greed in our midst, with lots of Rambo-esque violence thrown in, as well as an unusually protracted slugfest between ex-wrestler Roddy Piper and costar Keith David.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem, as always, is that when you try to mix cliches with more complicated data it's often the cliches that win out.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The English cast is fun; but this is more spectacle than story, and the Steve Kloves script deserves better handling than director Chris Columbus -- plus any number of studio deliberators -- gave it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was periodically put off by a certain self-conciousness in delivering this material.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's too bad that Pakula allows this 1993 movie to dawdle after its climax, but prior to that he's adept at suggesting unseen menace and keeping things in motion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast is good and the story affecting, though at times Michael Mayer's direction makes the production seem a little choked up over its own enlightenment. Sissy Spacek is memorable in a secondary role.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a noble undertaking, and Eastwood is stylistically bold enough to create a view of combat based mainly on images that are clearly manufactured. (As with "Saving Private Ryan," the movie's principal source is "The Big Red One," whose director, Samuel Fuller, actually experienced the war.) But this is underimagined and so thesis ridden that it's nearly over before it starts.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This isn't a major Dante effort, but his ability to make a good-natured satire that allows an audience to read it several ways at once is as strong as ever, and many of the sidelong genre notations are especially funny.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast--including Julianna Margulies, Olivia Williams, James Coburn, and Anjelica Huston--keeps this pretty watchable, and casting Mick Jagger as director of the escort service was inspired.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given all the filmed memory pieces about screaming, violent Italian-American families in New York boroughs, I'm not especially thrilled by even a well-made example.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As usual, Tarantino's sense of fun is infectious but fairly heartless.

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