For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Rushmore
Lowest review score: 0 The Ladies Man
Score distribution:
1,493 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A grand-style, idiosyncratic war epic, with wonderful poetic ideas, intense emotions, and haunting images rich in metaphysical portent.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Wong Kar-wai's idiosyncratic style first became apparent in this gorgeously moody second feature.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Haggis's dialogue is worthy of Hemingway, and the three leads border on perfection.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The overall mood is stately and melancholy, the selective use of color is ravishing, and some of the natural views are breathtaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Throughout the film cause and effect, the mainspring of most narratives, is replaced by a sense of spiritual synchronicity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its special effects are used so seamlessly as part of an overall artistic strategy that, as critic Annette Michelson has pointed out, they don't even register as such, and thus are almost impossible to trivialize, a feat unmatched in movies.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie's dreamlike spaces and characters are sometimes worthy of Lewis Carroll.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Hou's best film since "The Puppetmaster" (1993). It's also his most minimalist effort to date, slow to reveal its depths and beauties, and it marks a rejuvenation of his art.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Yes
    Beautifully composed and deftly delivered, it becomes the libretto to Potter's visual music, creating a remarkable lyricism and emotional directness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The title of Jia Zhang-ke's 2004 masterpiece, The World -- a film that's hilarious and upsetting, epic and dystopian -- is an ironic pun and a metaphor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This masterpiece, an art film deftly masquerading as a thriller, seems to celebrate small-town pastoralism and critique big-city violence, but this position turns out to be double-edged.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jarmusch has said that the film's odd, generally slow rhythm -- hypnotic if you're captivated by it, as I am, and probably unendurable if you're not--was influenced by classical Japanese period movies by Kenji Mizoguchi and Akira Kurosawa.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    All this edginess, combined with the grandeur and sweep of a classic western, demonstrates that Jones clearly knows how to tell a story -- and how to confound us at the same time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Whether the title refers to the baby or the thief remains an open question, and the viewer is left to decide whether the theme of redemption should be perceived in Christian terms. This builds to a suspenseful climax, and as in Hitchcock's best work, that suspense is morally inflected.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Both sad and darkly funny, the film is so sharply conceived and richly populated that it often registers like a Frederick Wiseman documentary, even though everything is scripted and every part played by a professional... This is only the second feature of Cristi Puiu, who claims to have been inspired by his own hypochondria, but he's already clearly a master.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Three Times, one of the peaks of his (Hou Hsiao-hsien) career, may be your last chance to see his work inside a movie theater.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A great film but also one of the most upsetting films I know.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The best documentary to date about the military occupation of Iraq.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A dedicated, charismatic, crack-addicted history teacher is the most believable protagonist in an American movie this year.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A lush piece of romanticism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The period details and performances are uniformly superb (Bob Hoskins is especially good as MGM executive Eddie Mannix), and the major characters are even more complex than those in "Chinatown."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An excellent introduction to the singular vision of avant-garde stage director Robert Wilson.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Much as Emile de Antonio's neglected "In the Year of the Pig" (1968) may be the only major documentary about Vietnam that actually considers the Vietnamese, this film allows the people of Iraq to speak, and what they say is fascinating throughout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    David Lynch's first digital video, almost three hours long, resists synopsizing more than anything else he's done. Some viewers have complained, understandably, that it's incomprehensible, but it's never boring, and the emotions Lynch is expressing are never in doubt.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It has few stars familiar to Americans, and it shares with "Pan's Labyrinth" the rare distinction of being a mainstream commercial movie with subtitles.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unlike most horror movies, this chiller gives equal prominence to reality and fantasy, though the reality is far more frightening. The only precedent that comes to mind in terms of a lyrical treatment of a child's experience of terror is "The Night of the Hunter."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One reason Bamako feels like a blast of sanity is that the theoretical debates about the state of the world, particularly Africa and more particularly Mali, are only half of its agenda. The other half, broadly speaking, is the life of everyday Africans.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    So accessible and entertaining.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Shot on a year's worth of weekends on a minuscule budget (less than $20,000), this remarkable work--conceivably the best single feature about ghetto life that we have--was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry as one of the key works of the American cinema, an ironic and belated form of recognition for a film that has had virtually no distribution. It shouldn't be missed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like much of Verhoeven's best work, it's shamelessly melodramatic, but in its dark moral complexities it puts "Schindler's List" to shame. Van Houten and Sebastian Koch (The Lives of Others) are only two of the standouts in an exceptional cast.