Jonathan Rosenbaum
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For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
1,493 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Compared with the novel, the movie might seem predictable. But compared with other movies, it stands alone.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Woo's third Hollywood movie, Face/Off, is the first to balance his visual imagination with the emotional intensity of his Hong Kong films.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's plenty of wit on the surface, but the pain of paralysis comes through loud and clear.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In one sense, this seemingly melodramatic plot premise is contrived, registering more as myth than as real possibility. Yet thanks to what the movie has in mind and especially what the actors bring to it, it's a lovely myth, one that has the ring of deeply felt truth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pedro Almodovar's 1995 comic melodrama seems in many ways his most mature work, in theme as well as execution.... Almodovar's control over the material and his affection for his characters never falter.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Clint Eastwood's ambitious 1988 feature about the great Charlie Parker (Forest Whitaker) is the most serious, conscientious, and accomplished jazz biopic ever made, and almost certainly Eastwood's best picture as well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This deserves to be seen and cherished for at least a couple of reasons: first for Joanne Woodward's exquisitely multilayered and nuanced performance as India Bridge, a frustrated, well-to-do WASP Kansas City housewife and mother during the 30s and 40s; and second for screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's retention of much of the episodic, short-chapter form of the books.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Under the thoughtful direction of Guy Ferland - what emerges is solid and affecting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not only Waters's best movie, but a crossover gesture that expands his appeal without compromising his vision one iota; Ricki Lake as the hefty young heroine is especially delightful.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A fascinating humanist experiment and investigation in its own right, full of warmth and humor as well as mystery.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nicely acted and inflected, this is a very fresh piece of work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pivots on the characters' racism and xenophobia, playing tricks with our own biases and ultimately justifying an extravagant array of coincidences and surprises.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Greengrass takes pains to keep events believable and relatively unrhetorical, rejecting entertainment for the sake of sober reflection, though one has to ask how edifying this is apart from its reduction of the standard myths.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provocative and entertaining.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Subtle and graceful directorial debut.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This cagey and compelling 2004 documentary looks at the world of wine, but it's actually a nuanced, provocative piece of journalism about globalization and its discontents.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Doesn't succeed in everything it sets out to do, which is a lot. But as a statement about the death rattle of 60s counterculture it's both thoughtful and affecting, and Daniel Day-Lewis is mesmerizing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To my taste the only serious distraction and ethical lapse is Gibney's sarcastic, cheap-shot use of popular songs like "That Old Black Magic," "Love for Sale," and "God Bless the Child" to underscore certain points; it seems almost to celebrate the shamelessness of the creeps being exposed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's more than a simple improvement, inverting some of the original's qualities so that the impersonal, well-crafted filmmaking remains lucid throughout.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    David Mackenzie, who directed the remarkable Scottish drama "Young Adam" (2003), delivers another masterful, disturbing tale of illicit passion, erotic obsession, and sudden death set in the 1950s.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This brisk, free-falling fantasy about the famous collators of German fairy tales, played here as a kind of comedy act by Matt Damon and Heath Ledger, is Terry Gilliam's most entertaining work since the glory days of "Time Bandits," "Brazil," "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen," and "The Fisher King."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fernando Meirelles stresses old-fashioned storytelling and takes full advantage of his cast, including Danny Huston.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Erik Van Looy skillfully profiles both the assassin (Jan Decleir, suggesting a tougher, over-the-hill version of Michel Piccoli) and the Antwerp detectives investigating his crimes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Kerrigan returns with his best work to date, at least in terms of narrative drive and suspense.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few plot details strain credibility, but the characters (particularly the friend's sister and little boy) are persuasively depicted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The implied critique of progressive, bohemian parenting is devastating--wise and nuanced, with the painful hilarity of truth.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Superior in every respect to the PBS documentary "The Murder of Emmett Till."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sensitive, intelligent, enlightening, and sometimes surprising.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It clocks in at over three hours, but Peter Jackson's remake of the 1933 classic is gripping. The film rethinks the characters, turning the original's stark Jungian fantasy into a soulless but skillful set of kinetic and emotional effects.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This brilliant if unpleasant puzzle without a solution about surveillance and various kinds of denial finds writer-director Michael Haneke near the top of his game, though it's not a game everyone will want to play.