For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Mala Noche
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
1,493 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unprecedented in its intellectual ambition, this is endlessly stimulating; it probably tries for too much, but it shames many other contemporary essays that try for too little.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a welcome throwback to the carefully crafted family films of the studio era. The scenery is lovely, and the cast is entirely worthy of the enterprise (including the regal and athletic star).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In one sense, this seemingly melodramatic plot premise is contrived, registering more as myth than as real possibility. Yet thanks to what the movie has in mind and especially what the actors bring to it, it's a lovely myth, one that has the ring of deeply felt truth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Action-adventure pictures have a lamentable tendency toward mindlessness, but Edward Zwick's epic story has numerous virtues apart from suspense and spectacle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pedro Almodovar's 1995 comic melodrama seems in many ways his most mature work, in theme as well as execution.... Almodovar's control over the material and his affection for his characters never falter.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Clint Eastwood's ambitious 1988 feature about the great Charlie Parker (Forest Whitaker) is the most serious, conscientious, and accomplished jazz biopic ever made, and almost certainly Eastwood's best picture as well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This deserves to be seen and cherished for at least a couple of reasons: first for Joanne Woodward's exquisitely multilayered and nuanced performance as India Bridge, a frustrated, well-to-do WASP Kansas City housewife and mother during the 30s and 40s; and second for screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's retention of much of the episodic, short-chapter form of the books.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Under the thoughtful direction of Guy Ferland - what emerges is solid and affecting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not only Waters's best movie, but a crossover gesture that expands his appeal without compromising his vision one iota; Ricki Lake as the hefty young heroine is especially delightful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cronenberg's follow-up to "A History of Violence" -- starring the same lead, Viggo Mortensen, in a very different part -- lacks the theoretical dimension of its predecessor, but it's no less masterful in its fluid storytelling and shocking choreography of violence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This poses some tricky moral questions, and its troubling ambiguities rank a cut above the dubious uplift of "Schindler's List."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's unclear whether this macho thriller does anything to improve the state of the world or our understanding of it, but it certainly sets off enough rockets to hold us and shake us for every one of its 99 minutes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An entertaining comedy-thriller directed with bounce (if not much nuance) by Barry Sonnenfeld.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you think 85 minutes devoted to a "difficult" French philosopher is bound to be either abstruse or watered-down middlebrow stuff, think again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fortunately, this time around the Ivy League characters project less of a glib sense of entitlement, making them more fun to watch, and Stillman himself gives more evidence of watching rather than simply listening.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An entertainingly offbeat blend of 19th-century science fiction and Hope and Crosby Road comedies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Period re-creations so rich you can taste them, and the fine cast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is effective as straight-ahead, action-packed storytelling, losing some of its energy only in the final stretch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Stylish and effective, if slightly overlong, thriller.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Striking for its performances -- especially Anthony LaPaglia.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a piece of disposable fluff -- though that's exactly what's so appealing about it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ridiculous enough to be hilarious, but this didn't prevent me from thoroughly enjoying Philip Kaufman's silly romp.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't much like movies about junkies...but this is easily the liveliest and most inventive I've seen since "Drugstore Cowboy" (1989).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Reputed to be sentimental crowd pleaser, for better and for worse.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A must-see.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    May have some of the trappings of an exotic thriller, but it's basically a character study.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has the expressionistic simplicity of Kurosawa's other late films.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The players and their stories are as wonderful as the music, and the filmmaking is uncommonly sensitive and alert.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The story didn't fully answer all my queries about the characters, but did such a nice job of keeping me interested that I wound up appreciating the mysteries that remained.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To my taste, the only serious drawback to this absorbing film is Harris's unimaginative adherence to documentary convention, which obliges him to "illustrate" the voice-overs even when the material matches the narratives only in fictional terms.