For 605 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Babadook
Lowest review score: 20 Super
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 605
605 movie reviews
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unfortunately, none of the subsequent noise is all that scary, and the striving for "Paranormal Activity’s" buzz is shameless.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Who will survive the night in order to deflower her? Mysteriously, the film has a hard time functioning on even this level, introducing complications for Mandy that the actor can’t pull off, adorable though she is.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Adult children and friends watch nervously as Pippa reclaims a measure of spunk; too bad it all feels like one of those pharmaceutical ads for longer, healthier lifestyles.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film is set in a celeb-owned Miami restaurant and many of the gags--exploding entrees, the swallowing of a diamond ring, on-the-job drunkenness--feel like leftovers.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    There are sparks here that suggest the smarter movie a more scientifically minded director--say, David Cronenberg--might have made.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Better to defrost "Alive" or "The Edge" from the video icebox.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Not since a Nam-scarred Sly Stallone asked, "Do we get to win this time?" in "Rambo: First Blood Part II" has an American action star been deployed to rewrite history so thoroughly.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Diced into hash, the action sequences are unusually painful: poundingly loud and punctuated by Liam Neeson's bark, Bradley Cooper's manic heehawing and a total lack of clarity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The sequences in Micmacs are contorted too: impressive and bendy and aggressively shallow.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Losers is the ultimate example, scraped from the bottom of the comic-book barrel, where writer Andy Diggle’s figurine-like characters first had their exploits in an exciting War on Terror.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    An eerie resurrection regains some good will, but we'll have to wait for Neshat to catch up with the art of storytelling.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    With this depressingly bland sequel (scripted by snark specialist Justin Theroux), he’s (Robert Downey Jr.) stranded in lightweight arrogance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The big absence here is the man himself; Gibney couldn’t get the jailed Abramoff on camera, either due to unwillingness or a Justice Department intervention. Whatever the reason, it’s crippling.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    No viewer goes into this movie expecting John Cassavetes's "Husbands," least of all from soft-serve director Denis Dugan (You Don't Mess with the Zohan).
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A proper profile of Hefner would start and end with sex, and not merely glance on casualties like Dorothy Stratten (and even the loveless Hef himself). The movie can't seem to get it up.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Never is the material excited into the kind of playful uncertainty that Rivette all but trademarked; the inertness of the performances robs the movie of spirit.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie you were hoping to avoid.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Marvel at the desperate spectacle of three comic leads-Aniston, Bateman and Watchmen's Patrick Wilson as the original donor-being outperformed by the wide-eyed Robinson, a quiet collector of silences. These stars will never be as young as he is; you wish they'd all stop trying.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like a stumpy limb requiring quick cauterization via steam pipe (our first cringe), the Saw series is begging for closure.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The script, credited to one Bert V. Royal, seems to have been run through an out-of-control sass machine (seriously, it'll make you appreciate Diablo Cody's tact).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Material like this doesn't require the additional strain of overnarrated freeze-frames, a "Cuckoo's Nest" supporting cast of adorable crazies and a Glee-ified musical number set to Queen and David Bowie's "Under Pressure."
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's really no focking place for the franchise to go anymore.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Here's a film that definitely wants to play Hollywood dress-up.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    You keep waiting for the movie to grow a brain, for that random attractive neighbor (Wilde) to turn out to be a decoy, for Banks herself to become suspect. Nope. The Next Three Days morphs into "The Fugitive" on steroids.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    What was Clint thinking? (Or Martin Scorsese, when he made "Shutter Island," for that matter.)
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A new Red Dawn could have been so much more fun had it thrown a properly out-of-bounds tea party. (It lacks the signature brawn of original director John Milius, a guns-first libertarian.)
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A perfectly boring movie from Julian Schnabel - is it possible?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie dies onscreen; it might be the best advertisement for avoiding the glories of Italy ever released by a Hollywood distributor.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Listen to the rhythms of "Broadcast News" - from Holly Hunter's daily crying jags to William Hurt's cock-of-the walk patter - and you'll hear how romantic comedy can approach an art form, a roundelay that requires the ear of a conductor. How Do You Know, James L. Brooks's latest, has such tone-deaf passages that it feels made by a totally different man.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    This can't be a faithful facsimile of the literary phenomenon currently turning soccer moms into Scandinoir crackheads. Nor can ethical journalist Mikael (Nyqvist), an uncoverer of conspiracies, actually be the dull, Windbreakered nonaction hero onscreen.