Joshua Rothkopf

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For 915 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
Lowest review score: 20 Knucklehead
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 915
915 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Charmingly, like a throwback to the pre-Twitter age, here's a horror film that's been made with no reasonable way to discuss it beforehand.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If you know nothing of the concentrated work of France's Robert Bresson, it's almost a crime to start here - like launching yourself, on the "expert" level, into the most boring, baguette-laden video game ever.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The action scenes-blissfully easy to follow-are where Whedon makes the giant leap into the big leagues.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Rarely do movies-never mind foreign ones, of any nationality - explore an honest-to-God ethical quandary. Elena, in its concentrated austerity, often resembles a lost chapter of Krzysztof Kieslowski's Ten Commandments–themed Decalogue.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You do sense, though, that the people behind MIB3 (mainly veteran producer Walter F. Parkes and script doctor David Koepp) were smart enough to let the audience grow up a bit, enough to get the Andy Warhol jokes and one brilliantly weird creation, a delicate alien who can see every outcome at once.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Kinji Fukasaku's slick, sick nightmare is best left to the quasi-banned realm where it exists as a perfect satire; when brought into reality, it's a touch awkward.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Organizing the mercurial emotions and tics is director Joachim Trier, making good on the promise of his 2006 feature debut, the lit-related drama Reprise. This one's even better-it's about the honesty that often takes root in survivors, a rarely explored subject-but Oslo, August 31st is not an easy film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There has to be room for this kind of plea, especially a work that, obliquely, captures so many largely unreported details: the night raids rounding up children, the torn-up olive trees and kids' soccer games in the battle zone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Nothing about the movie is showy, except for Shelton's palpable love of good people making a mess of things. Barring some late-inning coyness, it's some of the truest, dinged-heart couples' circling of the year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Didn't Soderbergh notice there was pathos enough in Matthew McConaughey's beefcake proprietor, an ab-slapping, spandexed Peter Pan? Between this role and his owlish DA in the subversively sly "Bernie," the actor has finally found a way to subvert his six-pack. He's the magic here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Blessed with an improbable-but-true story that functions on many ironic levels, this clever documentary ultimately conveys more about the complex American character - shifting between intimacy and criminality - than a whole shelf of fiction films.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The spirit of the movie is nonjudgmental, an observational intimacy that, in turn, becomes inspiring.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Morley has at least restored something of a soul to her subject.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new drama, best viewed as a church movie, is a return to the kind of corner-chat indie cinema Lee revolutionized, with an emphasis on a towering performance by The Wire's Clarke Peters as a local bishop inflamed with the Word.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director David Cronenberg - who knows a thing or two about bodily expressions - understands, finally, what to do with the Twilight star, turning his zombified handsomeness into a stark canvas upon which we can project our own anxieties.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You can't believe what you're watching: Compliance, true to its title, digs into the rarely explored subject of psychological acquiescence (behavioral scientist Stanley Milgram should get a cowriting credit), with common-sense dignity being the first casualty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's a comedy about the unchecked id; indeed, there's sleepwalking in it. But will those grunting strolls happen through a second-story window or on the highway? You're left cringing, and that puts Birbiglia in excellent company, alone though he might be in bed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Stopping just short of the devastating exposé it might have been (but plenty creepy).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Amazingly, Gere keeps it all together, via a kind of seething anti-rage that speaks reams to the character's survival instincts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    As time-travel action films go, here's one that's brainy, stylish and carries itself with B-flick modesty - all of which feels like some kind of alchemy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Arnold's vibrant, Malickian adaptation has another bold stroke worth mentioning: Heathcliff, a Gypsy in the original text, is now an Afro-Caribbean former slave, initially a bruised teen (Glave) and then an unusual, self-made man (Howson).
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If the documentary lacks anything, it's a firmer grasp of Springfield's own transformation, from "kind of a dick" (per ex–MTV jock Mark Goodman) during his heyday to a giving, appreciative showman. Call it humility, shaded with weird, two-way neediness. Jesse's girl may have dodged a bullet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real heat of The Sessions comes from its pitch-perfect sense of place, the free-spirited Berkeley of the 1980s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Adjust to the deliberate rhythms of this hiking movie-set on the lush slopes of Georgia's Caucasus Mountains - and the psychological payoff stings like a blister.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The metaphor is clever, injecting real-life risk and reward into these beautifully artificial vistas, scored to composer Henry Jackman's Nintendo-worthy beeps and bloops.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Bay, a real creepfest, joins the suggestive company of eco-terror entries like Hitchcock's "The Birds" and 1979's "Prophecy."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Generation P is worth struggling through, even if it boggles you. In many ways, it's a keyhole into the future of the entire world.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie works on a bedrock level that many ostensible action films forget. Let New Age viewers in your crowd get misty-eyed - there's plenty here for anyone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The attention to detail is fine-grained, especially on the slippery slope of plea bargaining. Missing are two pieces that might have turned this into an urban classic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Russell Crowe's pained vocal stylings (they sound more like barks) as relentless Inspector Javert can be forgiven after hearing Hugh Jackman's old-pro fluidity in the central role of Jean Valjean, hiding a criminal past.

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