For 605 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Los Angeles Plays Itself
Lowest review score: 20 Super
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 605
605 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's a wild, "Miami Blues"–like dreaminess to the movie that's addictive. If anything, it shows up exactly what "Little Miss Sunshine" lacked: plenty of ammo.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Room 237 asks that you bring your own noodles; as docs go, it leaves you with questions, some worry and rib-sticking satiation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s wonderful to think that a movie is, for a change, ahead of you.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Phenomenally sad yet exhilarating.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real heat of The Sessions comes from its pitch-perfect sense of place, the free-spirited Berkeley of the 1980s.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    In lesser hands, this could have easily been some seriously detestable John Wayne jingoism. But via Fiennes, the film is a spiky and complex counterweight to Hollywood sentiment and indie cynicism alike.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The attention to detail is fine-grained, especially on the slippery slope of plea bargaining. Missing are two pieces that might have turned this into an urban classic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    See this film immediately.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    With so many ideas to work with, why does Bell infantilize her elsewhere-confident main character as yet another disheveled woman-child?
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie works on a bedrock level that many ostensible action films forget. Let New Age viewers in your crowd get misty-eyed - there's plenty here for anyone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new Let Me In does more than merely preserve the original's mood; it actually improves on it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is a drama about finding one's self-worth; you simply have to see it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film isn’t exactly rousing in its conclusion, but it’s always respectful: a serious ethical inquiry into matters of women’s choice, both imposed and seized upon. Check it out.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Luca Guadagnino is having so much fun setting up the Kubrickian chill (even Barry Lyndon's Marisa Berenson is on hand) that when Emma and the much younger Antonio finally come together in warming Sanremo, their tryst almost sneaks up on you.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    So why is this songwriter, so articulate on vinyl, so vague and spacey in current-day interviews? Something happened here, deeper than an aborted quest for fame, and the documentary hasn't gotten to it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Drive feels like some kind of masterpiece - it's as pure a version of the essentials as you're likely to see.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Lanzmann’s feisty exchanges with Murmelstein, a brilliant talker, become an emotional symbol for the pursuit of slippery truth, while the filmmaker’s recently shot footage of Yom Kippur services show a way of life in robust continuation.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    An aggressively unpleasant man somehow lands a perfect series of gigs in this rudely funny documentary: first as a pounding rock drummer who revolutionized the field; then as a fearless, rage-filled polo player; and finally as an impatient interviewee.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Redemptively, the cast goes a long way: Jean Desailly is perfect as a jowly literary celeb deep in midlife crisis, while the aloof Françoise Dorléac is magnetic as his airline stewardess and all-too-scrutable love object.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film's sociopolitical critique is as dull as a sledgehammer - and maybe on the money - but the truth is far more entertaining.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s real Streetcar Named Desire territory as the fights pile up, and if you think that doesn’t sound entertaining, know that it is, in a hypnotically catastrophic way.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real richness of the movie, though, comes well in, as the improvised script gets around to deeper anxieties of aging and avoidance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    She has real sympathy--characters that might have been brittle, mockable creations in another writer-director’s hands gain resonance here. But the filmmaker also might have very little to say apart from the way guilt enters into life, and then suddenly recedes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The whole second half suggests a new way of storytelling-like one of those Wes Anderson montages done by an obsessive fan of Hatari! To judge from Tabu's first hour, pacing is not Gomes's strong suit, yet the filmmaker who emerges might win you over.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There has to be room for this kind of plea, especially a work that, obliquely, captures so many largely unreported details: the night raids rounding up children, the torn-up olive trees and kids' soccer games in the battle zone.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Frank Pavich’s fun documentary captures an unbowed, exuberant Jodorowsky, who recalls his team of “spiritual warriors” with the camaraderie of a battle-scarred veteran.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It probably would have helped if Walker (who credits two other codirectors) had chosen just one of those avenues for deeper study; her doc has a vertiginous way of feeling arty and ephemeral at one moment, humane and maybe too earthbound the next.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Nature smiles upon Alamar, just as it did on the simple, unfussy charms of "The Black Stallion" some 30 years ago.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is meat-and-potatoes genre work, certainly superior to a Hollywood product like "Edge of Darkness," but not by much.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Blessed with an improbable-but-true story that functions on many ironic levels, this clever documentary ultimately conveys more about the complex American character - shifting between intimacy and criminality - than a whole shelf of fiction films.