Joshua Rothkopf

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For 789 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Winter's Bone
Lowest review score: 20 This Means War
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 789
789 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Apfel is constantly chatting to “Albert” off camera, not to us, and the affection adds an unusual meta level to Iris, a conversation between two old-timers who have gone from making history to becoming it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Wilson, a pop savant, was chasing some kind of dragon, and as the movie toggles years forward to the scared, overmedicated Wilson of the 1980s (John Cusack, absorbingly strange in the tougher part), you sense that the dragon bit back.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Dope has thrilling moments and flies like Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, but its caustic intelligence glints fast and furious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ultimately, Jenkins teases out a fascinating theme of black identity shaped and altered by sales and evolving tastes.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    A movie that gives Streep her most emotionally blocked character in years, without caricature.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Strikes an intelligent balance between funk-scored pride and a more universal story of activism threatened by in-fighting and accidental celebrity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    A remarkably committed portrait of NYC homelessness in which Gere—grizzled and often topped in a wool cap—hunkers destitute. Call it an actor’s stunt if you must, but that would be overly dismissive of an indie with a serious mission of social awakening on its brow.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is a brutal movie that finds unusual freedom in limitations, as do wiry bassist Pat (Anton Yelchin) and bleach-blond concert attendee Amber (Imogen Poots), who both turn out to be pretty handy with weapons. Chalk it up to their killer instincts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Bringing optimism, nerd-itude and a touch of crazy to his character's solo ordeal—at one point, scraggly Watney calls himself a “space pirate”—Damon is the key to the movie’s exuberance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Tirola’s punchy timeline hits the breaks at the ’80s flameout, wobbling in its handling of self-destructive editor Doug Kenney. But until the defunct Lampoon starts magically reappearing in your mailbox, this excellently titled pic will do nicely.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Gifts of civility small and large mark Steven Spielberg's latest film, a deeply satisfying Cold War spy thriller that feels more subdued than usual for the director—even more so than 2012's philosophical Lincoln—but one that shapes up expertly into a John Le Carré–style nail-biter.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    In combining video, surveillance footage and her own 8mm family memories, Heart of a Dog quickly accesses a realm of ideas that vault it far higher than mere sentiment would allow.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cynthia Nixon commits wholly to her role’s maternal patience and scattered mental decay, but it’s Abbott who really dominates James White.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Of Stallone’s surprisingly tender performance — a definitive late-career triumph — enough can’t be said
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Amy Berg’s deeply sympathetic documentary on Janis Joplin — a singer whose shredded wail tapped reservoirs of pain — gets so much right, it feels like a major act of cultural excavation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Alfred Hitchcock’s interrogator, the rising French director and critic François Truffaut, brought a fan’s passion and a colleague’s precision to his questions. The result remains a how-to guide for Vertigo, Psycho and a future wave of nail-biters inspired by their observations.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    When a Hollywood comedy turns the crime of the century into a lark, you know a huge gamble has been chanced and won.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s as pure an expression of Tarantino’s voice as he’s ever mustered—easy to savor, even if the aftertaste leaves a trace of nasty bitterness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    One of [Moore's] more hopeful and celebratory efforts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even as the trio heads into a complicated dance of multiple infidelities, In the Shadow of Women never villainizes any of them.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If [it] doesn't feel quite as revelatory as Keep the Lights On (2012) or the heartbreaking Love Is Strange (2014), it still impresses you with its quiet, confident maturity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The story is a little slight compared to the grand romantic ache of Pride and Prejudice, but Beckinsale and Stillman do their inspiration proud: Finally, a Jane Austen movie that's fresh and deliciously rotten at the same time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like an updated The Commitments in rouge (liberally applied), Sing Street nails the details.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    En route to the harshest, most unremittingly bleak film of his career, Solondz unleashes some of his sharpest commentary on human mortality and regret.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It doesn’t seem new for them, yet as super polished, mannered, slightly surreal comedies go, the movie feels as rare as a unicorn.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Robustly entertaining.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Midnight Special is a movie worth believing in. It's an alternative to the assembly line that turns hot young directors into purveyors of the latest shade of superhero spandex. Little here feels like science or fiction but sci-fi is exactly what this is, from the heart and out of this world.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real-life setup is a knockout, both ancient and timely, and even though Rohrwacher never quite passes — she looks too much like Barbra Streisand’s "Yentl" — the movie is on to a larger point, namely about the fluidity of sexual identity and our universal penchant for self-reinvention. The film builds slowly but deserves an audience eager to discuss it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Family Fang goes deep into dysfunction, but even more impressively, it smuggles in the daredevilish art theories of the late Chris Burden and his ilk.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    When Kriegman is heard at a Weiner low point asking, “Why did you let me film this?” you’re glad the question is asked. But there’s no answer: The narcissism is all up there onscreen, but shame will have to wait for the sequel.

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