For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Host
Lowest review score: 0 Blindness
Score distribution:
1,480 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    This quiet, elegiac road movie hinges on a few beautifully underplayed scenes between Daniel London and Will Oldham.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    Hammer overplays his indie hand with an abrupt and unsatisfactory ending, but his three leads are so credible that their aching, tongue-tied characters linger in the memory.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Alexander Payne has won an Oscar for best adapted screenplay (Sideways), but you'd never guess that from this clumsily written drama: characters keep explaining things that their listeners would already know, and the first couple reels are so thick with expository voice-over that you may think you're listening to a museum tour on a set of headphones.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    Leigh pushes the story in a more interesting direction, asking whether people find happiness or simply will it on themselves.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It's a hell of a show, though none of the artists gets more than a single number, and most of Chappelle's comic interludes are half-baked. Funnier and more engaging are his perambulations around the neighborhood.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Robert Duvall, who played a similar character in Bruce Beresford's "Tender Mercies" (1983), turns up in a supporting role.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 J.R. Jones
    A quantum leap in movie magic; watching it, I began to understand how people in 1933 must have felt when they saw "King Kong."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 J.R. Jones
    Given the movie's slow, careful development, I was hardly prepared for the cold-sweat suspense of the last half hour.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 J.R. Jones
    The result is an instant classic. The material allows Anderson to neutralize the most irritating aspects of his work (the precociousness, the sense of white-bread privilege) and maximize the most endearing (the comic timing, the dollhouse ordering of invented worlds).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    A relatively mindless thrill ride that would have made the old NBC execs grin from ear to ear.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    In this littered environment there's no such thing as trash, only salvage, and the biggest threat to the siblings' humanity is a creeping tendency to think of themselves as commodities as well.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Into this cauldron walks the title character, a gentle Algerian refugee with his own history of terrible loss, and as he tries to take over the dead woman's class, his rocky relationship with the kids pushes both him and them to new levels of empathy, understanding, and forgiveness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This may be light family entertainment, but it's also a pleasingly perverse celebration of Victorian morbidity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    This moving documentary sidesteps the usual art-world debates over the authenticity and legitimacy of outsider work; instead director Jeff Malmberg simply immerses us in Hogancamp's world, just as Hogancamp immerses himself in the title town and its horrors.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    A densely textured moral universe that makes good on his metaphoric title-and in this case, the animals are perfectly willing to eat their young.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Scorsese transforms this innocent tale into an ardent love letter to the cinema and a moving plea for film preservation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    After directing three Spider-Man movies, Sam Raimi makes a masterful return to the horror genre.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Reitman deserves credit for going through with a bitterly ironic ending, but the movie is marred by its warm condescension toward flyover country.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The 3-D element is unobtrusively handled, except when it perfectly re-creates the woman who's always perched on her boyfriend's shoulders in front of you at a concert.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    This installment delivers more of the pleasures that made Tarantino the wunderkind of 90s cinema: offbeat scumbag characters, narrative sleight of hand, an extraordinary visual sense, and affectionate genre pillaging.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    You may not leave the theater having switched sides, but you'll probably respect the other side more, and that in itself would be a victory for human life.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The resulting portrait shows a seriously troubled man whose brutality was bred into him on the punishing streets of Brooklyn and whose modest wisdom seems as hard-won as any title. Tyson's fight career may be over, but his battle with himself has many rounds to go.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This 2004 video documentary by Werner Herzog arrives in town while his hair-raising "Grizzly Man" is still playing, and it's a fascinating companion piece even though his manipulations are more obvious.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 J.R. Jones
    It's a damning indictment of a national disgrace, but it also reveals the incredible faith and resilience of people who have nothing to rely on but themselves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    Cluzet's brooding performance propels the movie, and writer-director Guillaume Canet, best known here for his own acting work in "Joyeux Noel" and "Love Me If You Dare," skillfully orchestrates the cascading revelations.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The dialogue is multilingual but largely incidental to the action; the physical comedy is gracefully rendered and often magical.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Davies adapted a classic 1952 play by Terence Rattigan, whose centenary is being celebrated in Britain this year, and though you might have trouble sorting out the film's competing levels of authorship, one element attributable solely to Davies is the strategic use of music and quiet on the soundtrack.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This is superior family entertainment--warm, thoughtful, and connected to the landscape.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This is a drama of shifting values and compromised ideals, arriving at a view of life that's wise, complicated, and tinged with melancholy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie flames to life whenever Donald Sutherland moves into frame as the young ladies' relaxed, humorous, and magnificently rueful father.

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