Julie Salamon
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For 94 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Julie Salamon's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Player
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 3
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 51 out of 94
  2. Negative: 13 out of 94
94 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Big
    I am glad to be able to say that all these clever and talented people have actually come up with the goods. The biggest goodie is Tom Hanks as the little boy after his wish has been granted. Much of the comedy in this movie is physical. Without forcing the matter Mr. Hanks has a startling ability to take on the mannerisms and facial expressions of an adolescent. [2 Jun 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    With his co-writer, Randy Sue Coburn, and composer Mark Isham, director Alan Rudolph has created a sense of time and place that authentically conveys what it might have been like when writers were celebrities and special effects came from words. [10 Jan 1995, p.A18]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    To their credit, and to the credit of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward in the title roles of Mr. and Mrs. Bridge, the movie doesn't condescend to these relics of the recent past, but treats them with poignancy and humor. [21 Nov 1990]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Heathers gave me the creeps but it also made me laugh. This bizarre variation on that Hollywood staple, the teen movie, is one weird original. [30 Mar 1989 p.A12(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The movie blurs into a continuum of cars pounding one another and closeups of faces showing disgust, happiness, fear and outrage. It's the kind of shorthand imagery that works best in brief spurts, say, the amount of time it takes for a television commercial to implant a spark-plug brand into your brain. [5 Jul 1990, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    With a refreshing absence of earnestness, the movie mainly spins out many variations on a theme: Easy Street begins and ends on Capitol Hill. [03 Dec 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Odd as it seems for a film built on such a grand scale, sweet is the operative word here, and that's not meant as an insult. [29 May 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    A warm-heared picture with some hot dancing, some B movie class consciousness, lots of nostalgia and lots of cliches. [3 Sept 1987, p.17(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Silverado looks great and moves fast. Mr. Kasdan has packed his action well against the fearsomely long, dusty stretches of Western plain. [11 Jul 1985, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Too often the film languishes as Mr. Kasdan poses Big Questions and then has his characters answer them in conversations that are so casual they seem improvised. [26 Dec 1991]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    [(Cher's) never been better. [5 Jan 1988, p.22(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    It's all rather amusing, but after awhile you tire of all the perfect little nuances about characters who seem like prototypes for a certain type of Victorian novel. [6 Mar 1986, p.23(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Mad Dog and Glory also seems like two movies at once, only in this case the split comes off like a case of Siamese twins. Actually, it's girls on one side and boys on the other, and the boys get all the breaks. [4 Mar 1993, p.A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Green Card is quite pleasant to watch mainly because Mr. Weir hasn't disturbed its simple virtues with undue portent. Sometimes a plate of spaghetti with a simple tomato sauce is just the thing, and this is the movie equivalent of that. [10 Jan 1991, p A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Though the picture by no means endorses drugs, and paints the junkie life as almost intolerably dull as well as destructive, it is a welcome relief from the mostly heavy-handed Hollywood pictures that tackle the subject. [05 Oct 1989]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The Man Without a Face is nothing if not respectable, and occasionally it is something more than that. [26 Aug 1993, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    This fairy tale is a weirdly enchanting mixture of old-fashioned whimsy and up-to-the-minute special effects. It brings back the early excitement of reading as a child, when the act of turning pages took on a magical quality. [19 Jul 1984, pg.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The filmmakers aren't out to make a crisp action fantasy like the vigilante movies of the 1970s. Their disaffected man has no specific enemy or at least not one that he acknowledges; modern life is his enemy. This realization hits him one day and he begins to act on it, spontaneously. He's an existential vigilante. [25 Feb 1993, p.A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Singleton is a very good storyteller, but every once in a while he stops his story cold with speeches. You can feel the audience lost interest, as though a commercial has suddenly popped on screen. [18 July 1991, p.A9(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Whatever the movie's failings, it had enough poignancy and beauty to make me want to find out what was missing. [08 Oct 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Carter's intelligent, straight-forward style and the good performances of the young actors prohibit hooting at the story's completely American approach to a German story. [11 Mar 1993]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Lyne is able to make things look the way they're supposed to look because he trained in the television-commercial world. But he has a hard time getting beneath the gloss. [17 Sep 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Though not terribly interesting as political philosophy, A Few Good Men makes for a passably entertaining movie. [31 Dec 1992, p.A5(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Nichols decided to preserve the jokiness of the original material, even while shifting the emphasis to the mother-daughter conflict. There may have been a way to do this and end up with a clever movie, but Mr. Nichols seems to have had an even cleverer idea: He decided to use this movie as a way to pay back social obligations. [13 Sep 1990, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Some of the comedy bits have a delightful freshness and edge while much of the glue (the romance, for example) holding the routines together remains a little sticky. [31 Jan 1989, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    The movie that remains is lovely to look at, but spiritless, a listless coquette. But then, 9 1/2 Weeks isn't about talk. It isn't about sadomasochism. It isn't even about sex. It's about looking good. [20 Feb 1986, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Lethal Weapon is vulgar, violent and predictable. Yet, in some outbreak of id, I got caught up in the shenanigans of Danny Glover and Mel Gibson as a mismatched cop team. Mr. Glover is more than solid and Mr. Gibson has added a kind of raw humor to his repertoire that is extremely sexy. [5 Mar 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Like the "girls," the movie is flamboyant in almost every respect - the costumes, the humor and the sentimentality. [1 Sep 1994]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Despite the numerous predictable jokes about geriatric sex, the movie is very appealing for numerous surprising reasons. Many of them have to do with ice fishing in Minnesota. [9 Dec 1993, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    They have also stripped out almost all complexity, reducing the drama to a familiar match between good and evil. You've heard all the speeches before; only the nouns have been changed. [23 Dec 1993, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal

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