For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Sun
Lowest review score: 20 Everybody's Fine
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Crank’s Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor direct with their usual flashy brio, and basso profundo Keith David has a sublime cameo as a cop indignant at the thought of a pistachio peanut butter sandwich. It’s that kind of movie, folks.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It helps that Fame has been cast with performers who have the glow of possibility about them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Antal and his performers’ pure B-movie esprit is undeniable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    9
    Sobering stuff for an animated movie that pitches itself somewhere between cutesy children’s entertainment and hectoring Grimm’s fairy tale. The problem with 9, though, is that it lacks a consistent tone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The question lingers as the movie comes to its triumphant body-swapping close: Is this a pro-environment parable or a prophecy of virtual realities yet to come? Cameron's new world may very well be a verdant Matrix.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Often resembles a prime John Carpenter thriller--call it "Assault on Manger 13"--until an overcaffeinated angel-fu climax significantly lowers the intelligence quotient.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s unfortunate that the result is so unaffecting, especially in light of all the things the director does right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The doc’s breakout star is Vogue creative director Grace Coddington, a former model whose plain appearance (the end result of a horrible car accident) and frumpy clothing belie her genius for fashion. She counters her boss every chance she can get and provides the film with a much-needed emotional center.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Less deadpan spoof than loving act of possession, Black Dynamite near-fully channels the look and feel of its blaxploitation ancestors, warts and all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    If you’ve seen "Species," you know where this don’t-mess-with-Mother-Nature horror show is going, though director-cowriter Vincenzo Natali has a few interesting twists up his sleeve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Horse Boy comes off as both an edifying work of advocacy and an invasive home movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Visual Acoustics goes out of its way to remain as kindly and pleasing as Shulman himself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Adela’s troubles feel slight and underdeveloped in the face of the world around her; it’s all too appropriate, in the end, that nature swallows her whole.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Cage is not quite Aguirre or Fitzcarraldo in the Big Easy. But his performance hits all the right mythopoetic beats, rising above the thin script and late-night-cable aesthetic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s no room for such soul-searching uncertainty with Gibson. After a few rapidly ticked-off minutes of gloom, the mission is clear: Get the sons of bitches, and make ’em pay.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Terrific performances and superb cinematography (by Claire Denis’s right hand, Agnès Godard) lift cowriter-director Ursula Meier’s feature debut above its thuddingly metaphorical premise.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a kick to see Cera cut loose from his patented befuddled-nerd routine, even if the film’s caricatured performances and fish-in-a-barrel scorn are sure to be monotonous for some.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All the retroactively enlightened symbolism gets monotonous, and reaches an absurd apex with the introduction of a party-line newspaperman played by that scowling emblem of Teutonic depravity, Ulrich Tukur.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Somewhat underwhelming sequel.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    John Travolta breaks the braggadocio meter in the latest tightly wound actioner from "Taken’s" Pierre Morel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike Romero’s film, what’s missing is a trenchant sense of connection to our historical moment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film lurches through narrative incidents: Battle scenes, political intrigue and a ticking-time-bomb love triangle are all pitched at the level of mundane competence and rarely get the blood racing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is one case where there’s more life in the morgue than out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like so many Doors chroniclers, DiCillo can’t help but fall under the singer’s spell; it’s understandable, but frustrating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    About as deep as a kiddie pool, which isn't to say it's an unpleasant frolic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    One senses this is a production better suited to the stage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A believably unbalanced Bening scores the movie’s true coup: Karen’s revitalizing relationship with a sweetly persistent coworker (Jimmy Smits) is a rare example of Hollywood doing right by midlife romance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When The Father of My Children shifts focus to Grégoire’s wife (Caselli) and children (the eldest is beautifully played by De Lencquesaing’s actual daughter, Alice), Hansen-Løve’s hand steadies, and she reveals a true talent for intimate, behavioral observation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmakers do a good job of laying out the whos, whys and wheres through diagrams, reenactments and testimonials from veterans on both sides of the skirmish.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The aural and visual overload that marks most of the director's work is here in spades--few documentaries look and sound so distinctive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The setup is pure Looney Tunes, and indeed, Despicable Me is at its best when trading in the anything-for-a-laugh prankery that was a specialty of the Termite Terrace crowd.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Her (Angela Ismailos) heart's in the right place, but her subjects' ruminations demand a much larger canvas.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Never quite shakes its sitcom-ish setup. The director alternates incident-laden storytelling with penetrating character moments that her terrific cast acts to the fullest.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The sights and sounds are splendid--a lovingly hand-detailed portside city, a touching musical interlude in a windswept field--though they're largely disconnected from the narrative proper.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's prime B-movie material put through the Ridley Scott Cuisinart.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The casting, from lead roles to supporting, is uniformly terrific.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is the kind of movie in which it's considered the zenith of meta-wit to have a slumming Robert De Niro (as Machete's racist politico nemesis) drive a taxi.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Gould is as much of a mystery at the end as at the beginning. You get the feeling that's the way he'd have wanted it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson makes often-inspiring use of the 3-D effects.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The intention outweighs the execution, though there are still pleasures to be had.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film never entirely overcomes the sense that it's a calling-card vehicle.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Our fury is never directed toward concrete solutions, and that allows the guilty parties to slip, perhaps permanently, from our grasp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Strikingly picturesque locations and a terrific ensemble cast help this tonally inconsistent adaptation of Posy Simmonds's comic series pass by with relative ease, though it leaves a very peculiar aftertaste.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    RED
    It's the casting, stupid!
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are plenty of formulaic boo! moments, yet Craven intelligently treats Bug's otherworldly issues like hormonal growing pains that must be tamed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's so much right with Gareth Edwards's low-budget alien invasion tale that you almost want to brush aside everything that's not up to snuff.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Depardieu and Cornillac's sibling rivalry, which segues between mostly verbal smackdowns and liquored-up bursts of merriment, is beautifully observed, as is the relationship between the detective and his devoted wife (the wonderful Marie Bunel). The thriller stuff, by comparison, is just a lot of perfunctory deadweight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    People who like their comedies pitch black (we're talking midnight, no stars or moon) should get a kick out of the tale of Steven Russell (Carrey).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Someone surely thought to call this knowingly ridiculous genre mash-up "Cowboys vs. Ninjas," though even that title wouldn't hint at all the you-gotta-be-kidding-me craziness on display.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The divas rule in this glossy musical.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Disney knows how to bewitch a crowd, but the sense that Tangled was made more by corporate mandate than artistic spark remains constant throughout.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For everything admirable, like the way female Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana (the wonderful Gakire) resigns herself to a violent death, there's a heavy-handed metaphor-a cute gaggle of orphaned goats-ready to smack away the intelligence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The fancifulness wears out its welcome, though, and you often wish the film would treat its subject with a bit more seriousness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the duo will work their way back to each other is never in doubt, although Chazelle doesn't succumb to easy sentiment. If anything, he moves too far in the other direction, aiming for a wizened ambiguity that doesn't entirely come off.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tony Scott almost wins us over with this fun thrill ride.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the faux-realist aesthetic (gritty handheld camerawork; all-natural sound), we never feel like much is at stake, though Pistereanu and Condeescu have an easygoing rapport that makes the quieter moments between them affecting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The major change is that the domestic, Eun-yi (the great Jeon, star of "Secret Sunshine"), is now more of a victim than an aggressor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    We certainly need all the ecological jeremiads we can get. But must they be so numbingly pedantic?
    • 23 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's sure-to-be-brief theatrical release is a mere stopover on the way to basic-cable eternity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Chu does his best to humanize his subject, showing him surrounded by devoted friends and family, and wringing much drama from an on-the-road vocal-cord strain.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Tariq Tapa-who shot much of this vérité-style film by himself-does a beautiful job attuning us to Dilawar's drifting routine, but what's especially striking is how he gives equal weight to the supporting characters.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Lovingly designed, but dramatically inert.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The laughs are purely surface; the film's women's-lib pretensions seem grafted on as if to lend significance to a story that would benefit from a lighter, less cerebral touch. Still, it's hard to resist La Deneuve's charms.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Begins in the land of lunacy and ends up somewhere on the far side of deranged.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What begins as a tense, inventive suspense film becomes, to paraphrase Doctor Who, a wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey, mushy-wushy mess. That's decidedly NOT fantastic.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The belly laughs do come, many of them courtesy of the mechanical bird companion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Subtlety is not this movie's strong suit; even the terrific Chemical Brothers score pounds your nerves a bit more than it should.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Don't go in expecting scares so much as laughs. Scream 4 is a better "Scary Movie" than any of the "Scary Movies" ever were, from its inventively gut-busting kills (watch out for that mail slot!) to the unintentionally humorous sight of the three leads acting as if they're in three separate films.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Teegarden and McDonell make up for the hand-me-down plotting with a sweet, unaffected chemistry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Two monologues-one in which the Hobo compares himself to a bear, the other a Travis Bickle–like screed delivered to a roomful of increasingly distressed babies-are damn near Shakespearean. It's a shame the performance is contained in a Z-movie patchwork that's a bit too knowingly repugnant.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That T.J. and his family willingly allow this headbanging psycho(analyst) to move into their cluttered, dankly lit abode-the emotional damage is palpable, yo!-is just one of the film's many eyebrow-raising contrivances.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The kids pick up the filmmakers' lyrical slack more often than not, but this ode to the power of verse could really use a redraft.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For an animation studio that too often specializes in the frivolous and glib (begone, Shrek series!), the move to the dark side is refreshing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's commitment to representing the harsh truths of an unfortunate historical moment is admirable, but it tends to grate rather than illuminate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As to the movie's three sections, the best comes first, as an eclectic "cast" of characters (among them philosopher Alain Badiou and musician Patti Smith) pontificate their way around a lavish Mediterranean cruise ship.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hopper keeps things light and off-the-cuff, allowing his performers free rein - sometimes too much, as in the case of the screechy and shrill Farrell - to explore grim territory without falling into heavy-handedness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That One Lucky Elephant ultimately comes down on the side of anthropomorphizing Flora and her kind is extremely disappointing - a little clear-eyed ambivalence would have helped the film feel more focused and less like patchwork.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The falsely euphoric close is a big misstep - Pulitzers, it would seem, are the ultimate Band-Aid. What was that old adage about printing the legend?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The good news is that the film's stylistic excesses don't negate the many fascinating aspects of Nim's story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Belvaux's tension-building setup is stellar; the follow-through, less so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike a great Morris film such as "Gates of Heaven" or "Mr. Death," where the quirks of character feel connected to a larger, profoundly insightful vision of humanity, Tabloid never gets beyond its idiosyncratic surface.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's especially disappointing when the story takes an inevitable turn to starry-eyed mush, dulling the sharp satire of the crazy, stupid ins and outs of romantic entanglement with an unconvincingly saccharine one-true-love-for-all moral.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The directors rarely go beyond the experiential to provide larger, lasting insight into the journey's generational and historical importance. As such, the comedown from this Trip is a real bitch.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's hard to hate a movie that affectionately references the oeuvre of Kathryn Bigelow (both The Hurt Locker and Point Break!) and uses a whiny Third Eye Blind ballad as an acidic punch line.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The subjects - a husband and wife struggling to make ends meet, mostly for the well-being of their infant daughter - are eminently engaging.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Inventive yet exhausting tale of two circus clowns.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's secret weapon proves to be Freddy Krueger–fingernailed witch Marique, whom Rose McGowan plays with the kind of fuck-it-all brio - imagine a cross between Madeline Kahn in "History of the World: Part I" and Lady Gaga - that should garner her a Razzie and an Oscar.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The jittery aesthetic is a bit grating - there's a three-cut minimum per roundhouse kick - but the spectacularly named Olivier Megaton (Transporter 3) still manages to deliver the action-film goods.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When the monsters finally show themselves, this potent theme is lost amid a lot of proficiently staged but insubstantial scare scenes - heavy on musical stingers and weightless CGI.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As the Sherlock Holmes of the second Zhou Dynasty, Lau is so effortlessly appealing that he manages to anchor the fatigue-heavy proceedings, even when his character has to outrun both the rays of the sun - don't ask - and a collapsing statue while crawling over and under a pack of stampeding horses. Now that's star power.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it still works like gangbusters - tears will be stifled by the end of the sibling vs. sibling finale - and most of the credit should go to Hardy, Nolte and Edgerton.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fists fly furiously and much blood is spilled; there's a sacrifice via sword that's both cringe-inducing and cheerworthy. Even special guest star Jackie Chan gets in on the fun with a hilarious bit of food-jitsu. It's almost enough to make you forget that this entertainingly hollow film is populated entirely with toy soldiers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is still a fascinating history, especially when Limelight touches on the club scene's dark side: A lengthy dissection of the Angel Melendez murder, complete with an appearance by weathered-looking killer Michael Alig, chillingly shows how the out-all-night lifestyle can take its toll.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Weekend settles into an intentionally minor-key groove, caught somewhere between bracingly direct honesty and cringingly mumbly pretense.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When it comes to scenes in which characters are asked to say more than two words, however, the filmmaker's a decided amateur; Moretz, in particular, seems hopelessly stranded as the attitudinal wild child.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the filmmaker at least makes a concerted effort to tweak what in most hands would be an offensively whitewashed dark-continent parable is worth some measure of praise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    But take the puppet off his arm and he seems somehow vague and incomplete, like the Wizard of Oz without his curtain.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly though, it feels like we're watching a superficial gloss on Goodman's CV rather than a probing interrogation of his legacy. For the choir only.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Other than ludicrously pulpy fun, Anonymous, true to its title, ultimately signifies nothing.

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