For 629 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Manakamana
Lowest review score: 0 The Do-Over
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 629
629 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The haphazardness of the film's structure mutes the power of the subjects' recollections.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Depardieu and Cornillac's sibling rivalry, which segues between mostly verbal smackdowns and liquored-up bursts of merriment, is beautifully observed, as is the relationship between the detective and his devoted wife (the wonderful Marie Bunel). The thriller stuff, by comparison, is just a lot of perfunctory deadweight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Aatsinki siblings never rise past a kind of rotely anonymous masculinity, and overall the film tends to lull rather than engage the senses.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A too-pat ending also spoils Rubberneck (shorter: Mommy made me do it!), though it doesn’t ruin the steely pleasures of the filmmaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike a great Morris film such as "Gates of Heaven" or "Mr. Death," where the quirks of character feel connected to a larger, profoundly insightful vision of humanity, Tabloid never gets beyond its idiosyncratic surface.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though often funny, there’s a reverse narcissism in the way Karpovsky wallows in his “character’s” off-putting flaws.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Tariq Tapa-who shot much of this vérité-style film by himself-does a beautiful job attuning us to Dilawar's drifting routine, but what's especially striking is how he gives equal weight to the supporting characters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    No new ground is broken, and viewers will, not unpleasantly, get everything they expect. It’s apparently morning in America again.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The more that fright-flick conventions take over, the more the movie's recognizable and resonant human fears are dulled.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The question lingers as the movie comes to its triumphant body-swapping close: Is this a pro-environment parable or a prophecy of virtual realities yet to come? Cameron's new world may very well be a verdant Matrix.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Never quite shakes its sitcom-ish setup. The director alternates incident-laden storytelling with penetrating character moments that her terrific cast acts to the fullest.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The scenes of the film’s exuberant, frizzy-haired protagonist wandering Naples and revisiting old haunts, however, seem much more unfocused—a ramshackle search for insights into the man’s art and life that rarely come. The instruments are in tune, but the rhythm is off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hopper keeps things light and off-the-cuff, allowing his performers free rein - sometimes too much, as in the case of the screechy and shrill Farrell - to explore grim territory without falling into heavy-handedness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What keeps you watching is the charisma of the performers: Hamm does an amiable riff on his Don Draper persona (he’s cynical before the big melt), Lake Bell is a delight as his tart-tongued love interest, and Sharma and Mittal are all charm as the cultures-uniting underdogs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What really matters is seeing these pretty people get put through the gory wringer, and once the unholy spirit comes calling, Evil Dead more than delivers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's not much beyond all the fawning, but the effusively talented Channing more than deserves the gush.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    People who like their comedies pitch black (we're talking midnight, no stars or moon) should get a kick out of the tale of Steven Russell (Carrey).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ai is a great subject for a documentary, and his charismatic certitude helps to offset Klayman's unfortunate inexperience behind the camera.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though the tale demands a darker outcome, the director disappointingly goes the Mouse House happy-ending route with a reprise of the original short film's finale - one that somehow plays with even more cringeworthy sentimentality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The jarring juxtapositions only heighten the enigmatic air of the film's subject; even when he's right in front of us, he seems to be plotting his next wily act.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Visual Acoustics goes out of its way to remain as kindly and pleasing as Shulman himself.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer this "Abbott and Costello's Lethal Weapon" goes on, the more the fun dissipates - until a queasily violent climax, which, naturally, fully embraces genre stereotypes rather than dismantling them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the duo will work their way back to each other is never in doubt, although Chazelle doesn't succumb to easy sentiment. If anything, he moves too far in the other direction, aiming for a wizened ambiguity that doesn't entirely come off.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A believably unbalanced Bening scores the movie’s true coup: Karen’s revitalizing relationship with a sweetly persistent coworker (Jimmy Smits) is a rare example of Hollywood doing right by midlife romance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As subcultural anthropology, it’s unassailable. Yet the often ugly-looking DV aesthetic dilutes the cumulative effect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can't help feeling that an initially adventurous movie has had its rough edges sanded away.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    RED
    It's the casting, stupid!
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's enough filmmaking talent evident throughout that you wish the journey were more satisfying overall.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the story takes a murderous turn, things quickly fall apart. Too many perfunctory side characters, such as Dennis's clueless parole officer, dilute any sense of tension; the bargain-basement visuals-all overlit interiors and unmotivated zooms-never rise above the luridly cheap; and hoo-boy, those final scenes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine "His Girl Friday" crossed with "Armageddon" and you’ll get a sense of the unfortunate disconnect that prevents an enjoyable light entertainment from achieving rom-com nirvana.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The setup is pure Looney Tunes, and indeed, Despicable Me is at its best when trading in the anything-for-a-laugh prankery that was a specialty of the Termite Terrace crowd.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie’s admirable fleetness, however, doesn’t mitigate some of its narrative errors — Alexander’s opening voiceover suggests his family is totally oblivious to his role in their misery, which is disproved by a later scene — nor does it counteract an overall sense of slightness that prevents this from being a family-film classic.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The early scenes of Gabe Ibáñez’s impressively mounted but uneven thriller do some terrific dystopian world-building.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The overall effect is not unlike watching a chef de cuisine experimenting in his off-hours; not everything takes, but you still come away with a pleasingly stimulated palate.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Stick with the film, though, and you might find yourself strangely moved by its oddball mix of ripe melodrama, overwrought violence and regional verisimilitude.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are plenty of formulaic boo! moments, yet Craven intelligently treats Bug's otherworldly issues like hormonal growing pains that must be tamed.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The belly laughs do come, many of them courtesy of the mechanical bird companion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The uniformly showy performances (Acting with a capital ‘A’) are what do in Prisoners more than anything.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    About as deep as a kiddie pool, which isn't to say it's an unpleasant frolic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When The Father of My Children shifts focus to Grégoire’s wife (Caselli) and children (the eldest is beautifully played by De Lencquesaing’s actual daughter, Alice), Hansen-Løve’s hand steadies, and she reveals a true talent for intimate, behavioral observation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately Coppola’s sensitivity is always evident, especially in the open-hearted performances she gets from Roberts and Kilmer (whose father, Val, has a funny, pot-addled cameo).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The divas rule in this glossy musical.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's fascinating to be so close to a then-sitting head of state as he negotiates for his homeland's survival, and the news that Nasheed was recently deposed in a coup by Gayoom loyalists makes the hard-won victories he did secure all the more poignant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is not a choice made lightly by anyone involved, but the admirable, multilayered toughness of these sequences is unfortunately weakened by the filmmakers’ saccharine touch whenever they explore the doctors’ personal lives.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Miners' is tiresome and scattershot.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The subjects - a husband and wife struggling to make ends meet, mostly for the well-being of their infant daughter - are eminently engaging.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Inventive yet exhausting tale of two circus clowns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Subtlety is not this movie's strong suit; even the terrific Chemical Brothers score pounds your nerves a bit more than it should.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Somewhat underwhelming sequel.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    They have little feel for the technical side of filmmaking; the imagery is flat and the editing amateurish. Most shots seem held for a beat too long or too short, wreaking havoc with the comic rhythm. Nonetheless, McCarthy and Falcone’s attempts to make Tammy more flesh-and-blood than a figure of fun are often poignant.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Expertly conjured atmosphere only gets Muschietti so far, but there's enough genuine promise here that you're willing to cut this talented newcomer some slack.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike Romero’s film, what’s missing is a trenchant sense of connection to our historical moment.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Marvin Kren’s enjoyable if ephemeral horror movie gets by for a while on its dopey premise.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like so many Doors chroniclers, DiCillo can’t help but fall under the singer’s spell; it’s understandable, but frustrating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Cage is not quite Aguirre or Fitzcarraldo in the Big Easy. But his performance hits all the right mythopoetic beats, rising above the thin script and late-night-cable aesthetic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Still, if any modern strip is worthy of an extended, Hobbes-style tongue bath, it’s this one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s no real pleasure in any of the musical performances. And when married to the scenes exploring Hendrix’s tumultuous personal life—particularly his semi-abusive relationship with long-term girlfriend Kathy Etchingham (Hayley Atwell)—you’re left with a monotonously grim portrait that’s more rewarding in theory than execution.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The doc’s breakout star is Vogue creative director Grace Coddington, a former model whose plain appearance (the end result of a horrible car accident) and frumpy clothing belie her genius for fashion. She counters her boss every chance she can get and provides the film with a much-needed emotional center.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Carell and Wiig make a splendid vocal pair — Nick and Nora Charles with ice guns and lipstick Tasers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The intention outweighs the execution, though there are still pleasures to be had.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a fine line between modesty and inconsequence, and this low-key, primarily improvised feature from mumblecore staple Joe Swanberg mostly blurs the divide.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    So many blockbuster movies are impersonal, micromanaged hashes that Jack, with its bare minimum of craft and commitment, comparatively comes off like a diamond in the rough.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    John Travolta breaks the braggadocio meter in the latest tightly wound actioner from "Taken’s" Pierre Morel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it still works like gangbusters - tears will be stifled by the end of the sibling vs. sibling finale - and most of the credit should go to Hardy, Nolte and Edgerton.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    But take the puppet off his arm and he seems somehow vague and incomplete, like the Wizard of Oz without his curtain.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    These scenes make you wish the rest of the movie had similar bite, but Gibney tends toward that dutiful doc style that mixes talking heads and archival clips into a flavorless stew—a bland complement to Fela’s zesty on- and offstage presence.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A Euro gloss on "Pretty Woman" suddenly turns into "Occupy Gaul."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All of this is fascinating in the moment, yet the doc never yokes all these threads into anything particularly deep or illuminating. The Galapagos Affair is less social commentary, more gossip.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like all of Tarsem's films, story takes a backseat to visuals, and there's plenty to pop the eyes-love those life-size string-puppet assassins!-if not, ultimately, to stir the soul.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When it comes to scenes in which characters are asked to say more than two words, however, the filmmaker's a decided amateur; Moretz, in particular, seems hopelessly stranded as the attitudinal wild child.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Horse Boy comes off as both an edifying work of advocacy and an invasive home movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Joe
    Yet Green, as is his wont, too often strains for poetic effect through flowery voiceover and tone-deaf interactions — like those between Joe and his latest short-term girlfriend — that undercut the genuineness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer the film goes on, the more it seems like a collection of gorgeous images without an overall organizing structure. Our youthful lead’s slow disillusionment with his complicated surroundings ultimately plays less profound than petulant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Israel-Palestine conflict is reduced to a crystalline, though still complicated, essence in Nadav Schirman’s alternately tedious and engrossing documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the rote plot takes over - the tension brought on by the film's you-are-there verisimilitude quickly devolves into soapily overwrought theatrics.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The brotherly-love epiphany to which the film builds does effectively pluck the heartstrings, but there’s a lingering sense that we’re being had.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Maier’s images are truly stunning—vivid documents of the working class that are off-the-cuff yet rigorously composed, always capturing that enigmatic bit of her subject’s soul that leaves you in spine-tingled awe.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Mouth’s dubious legacy and his many off-camera complications are examined with a coarse affection of which he himself would surely approve.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    They (Bullock/McCarthy) deserve a much stronger showcase than this Laurel & Hardy Go Policin’ vehicle.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You’re thankful when Ayer stops trying to artistically tart up this Peckinpah-lite tale of vengeance and just lets his leading man do what he does best: blow the bad guys away.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Don't go in expecting scares so much as laughs. Scream 4 is a better "Scary Movie" than any of the "Scary Movies" ever were, from its inventively gut-busting kills (watch out for that mail slot!) to the unintentionally humorous sight of the three leads acting as if they're in three separate films.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie feels like too much of a lark. To paraphrase the play’s voice of reason, Friar Francis, it would be better if Whedon paused awhile and let his counsel sway us more.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The fancifulness wears out its welcome, though, and you often wish the film would treat its subject with a bit more seriousness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is a movie that preaches to its rafters-raising choir.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly though, it feels like we're watching a superficial gloss on Goodman's CV rather than a probing interrogation of his legacy. For the choir only.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is hardly a symphony of terror, but it’s still a solidly composed exercise in suspense.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s no room for such soul-searching uncertainty with Gibson. After a few rapidly ticked-off minutes of gloom, the mission is clear: Get the sons of bitches, and make ’em pay.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Here, though, everyone involved seems above the rom-com conventions they’re satirizing, so anxious to get to each punch line that they let the connective tissue languish. You howl often but quickly forget why.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ed Harris is a performer made for Westerns, and he’s perfectly utilized in debuting director Michael Berry’s middling if still very watchable modern-day oater as Roy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The kids pick up the filmmakers' lyrical slack more often than not, but this ode to the power of verse could really use a redraft.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though its insights are slight-the movie feels as delicate and ephemeral as its sleepy winter surroundings - you can't help but admire the overall generousness O'Brien shows to his characters and performers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Clooney occasionally shows a surer hand: He gets great work from Downton Abbey’s Bonneville — notably in an emotionally charged scene revolving around Michelangelo’s Madonna of Bruges — and has a fine monologue himself, in which Stokes dresses down a high-ranking German commander (a moving encapsulation of the American spirit at its best).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Disney knows how to bewitch a crowd, but the sense that Tangled was made more by corporate mandate than artistic spark remains constant throughout.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Melodrama often risks the ridiculous to achieve the sublime, and though this unabashedly earnest tearjerker doesn’t completely transcend its narrative absurdities, it’s enough of a distinctively odd duck to keep you engaged.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Teegarden and McDonell make up for the hand-me-down plotting with a sweet, unaffected chemistry.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The sights and sounds are splendid--a lovingly hand-detailed portside city, a touching musical interlude in a windswept field--though they're largely disconnected from the narrative proper.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Both Robert and Gus seem defined purely by their eccentric speech patterns, and it takes a while for the duo to register as anything other than acting-exercise conceits. But once the story takes a defiantly odd turn into thriller territory (really an excuse to hole up two talented thespians in a single location), the affected nature of the performances becomes a virtue.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For everything admirable, like the way female Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana (the wonderful Gakire) resigns herself to a violent death, there's a heavy-handed metaphor-a cute gaggle of orphaned goats-ready to smack away the intelligence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can’t help but feel all the palpable joy is eliding some darker realities that would lend the copious musical performances a deeper resonance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave impressed at the way Stanton fiercely protects the aura of mystery that makes him such an indelible onscreen presence.

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