For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Lowest review score: 20 Uncertainty
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You may often find yourself second-guessing the film, questioning how—and if—it will all come together. But by the time of the intense and impassioned climax, a storm of emotion is ensured: a great movie rising before you like a delusion, like a dream.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The journey is often challenging, but the rewards—heady, emotional, provocative and invigorating—are endless.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It's McConaughey who is the real revelation: All Grim Reaper strut and cutthroat stare, he savors each of Letts's vividly ghoulish lines.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Brava, Mia! The exceedingly talented Ms. Hansen-Løve (the writer-director of Father of My Children) is sure to win many more fans with her latest feature, an incisive, exhilaratingly frank examination of l'amour lost.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Those Dardenne brothers…still making great movies with second-nature ease.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The most impressive aspect of Breillat’s feature is that it agitates like the best fairy tales, seducing us with otherworldliness before sticking the knife in and permanently inscribing the moral.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Cold War is over, but director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) and his collaborators have brought those suspicion-fueled days to vivid life in this masterful adaptation of John le Carré's beloved 1974 spy novel.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    If Jim Jarmusch’s languorous, laconic style isn’t your bag, his stone-faced vampire comedy won’t make you a believer. Those who’ve already been bitten, however, will swoon like the film’s toothy leads whenever their lips touch neck juice.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Moreover, the story doesn’t climax in all’s-well-that-ends-well matrimony, instead building to a beautifully bittersweet moment of self-realization, one with a light-touch profundity that would make the Bard proud.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    No simplistic status parable. It’s more a psychological snapshot of a person forever doomed to remain a voyeur to her own life
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Rohmer has a genius for taking a seemingly mundane situation and slowly tightening the screws.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It isn't until the story reaches its fancifully abstract final passages, where cinema displaces music as Douglas's weapon of choice, that Chase's reverie reveals itself as a particularly exceptional exploration of how art ceases being an idle hobby and becomes an obsessive vocation.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It’s likely that only Herzog would dare to, and succeed at, resolving this singular cinematic object by contemplating the fate of an abandoned basketball.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The popular view of art is that it belongs to the masses. Wiseman casts a more skeptical eye, questioning such egalitarianism with cold, hard historical context. Yet he simultaneously acknowledges that these works live on far beyond their original purpose, even if, as the film’s bold, brilliant climax suggests, they may eventually play to an audience of none.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sokurov, who also acted as director of photography, films the character and his surroundings with the eye of a newly arrived visitor to another world.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Strangely enough, our knowledge of what’s to come makes Word Is Out that much more affecting, because it shows that there were—and are—pockets of peace amid the brutality of an ongoing civil-rights struggle.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Tree of Life enthralls right from the start.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    A dream, indeed. Sure to delight foodies and cinephiles alike.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sure it is - and a great one at that.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Wang has made a confidently intimate movie that is devastatingly larger-than-life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    By using Laura as an avatar, Marker actually helps us see the visuals and their knotty meanings much more clearly. The more we watch, the more Laura softens, until — in a mind-bending conceit — her very status as a fictional creation is called into question. The effect is ecstatic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Alain Resnais's mind-bending new feature.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    By the time they've taken full control of the movie's alternate universe-as the melodrama morphs with marvelous ease into a musical comedy-you feel like anything is possible. Cinema this alive is a rare bird, indeed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    And though not all of Lonergan's conceits work on a scene-by-scene basis (an upper-crust womanizer played by Jean Reno skews a bit too close to caricature), the film has a cumulative power-solidified by a devastating opera-house finale-that's staggering. This is frayed-edges filmmaking at its finest.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Filmmakers from Jacques Rivette to Hou Hsiao-hsien have treated the City of Light like Alice’s rabbit hole; writer-director Hong Sang-soo similarly embraces the fantasy, but goes one step further in this extraordinary character study by fully erasing the line that separates the actual from the fictional.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Gallo and Dalle are sublimely tragic figures; the scene in which Shane stalks around Notre Dame like Frankenstein unleashed is a pitch-perfect encapsulation of the way the film plays with and deepens movie-monster archetypes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This time around, the director documents a 2011 Young solo show in Toronto (the musician's birthplace), but in an intentionally fractured way.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Nichols has said that the idea for the film emerged from a free-floating anxiety that he sensed in the world at large, the feeling that everything we treasure in life could be lost in an instant. That sensation permeates this strikingly original movie - especially its enigmatic mind-fuck of a finale, which will haunt you for several lifetimes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Indeed, you leave the film feeling like Wiseman has given you a glimpse of one of those ephemeral ports in a storm to which all of us retreat at times.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It is the richly evocative performances of Marion (aggressive yet enticing) and Merhar (wearing world-weariness like an aged suit) that cut deepest.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You might actually say the documentary itself is Mohassess’s final canvas, so infused it becomes with his alternately infuriating and infectious personality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    These characters are more than what we see on the surface, and it's thanks to Leigh's rigorous yet generous eye that we never just gawk at the drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Its stunningly composed images showing how Isaac is himself something of a ghost-given to staring off into the distance, being condescended to by those around him, a man perpetually outside the times. What he needs is to take that one extra step toward his spectral siren; the scene in which he does so might be one of the most exhilarating visions of death's sweet embrace ever filmed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You could hardly ask for a more beautiful vision of souls in transit.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    What you see and hear always seems perfectly natural, even if you can't exactly say why. Who needs words when you have cinema?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This is Young in his playroom, grabbing his toys at random while indulging his every antimelodic whim, and Demme’s off-the-cuff approach makes for the perfect aesthetic complement.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The meanings of Close-Up shift, subtly and profoundly, with every viewing; the only certainty is that its rewards are boundless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Exploitative as this may seem in theory, it works beautifully onscreen, mostly because of Binoche’s radiantly complicated humanity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Skyfall has the feel of both a ceremonial commemoration and a franchise-rebooting celebration, especially in the ways it attempts to too cutely sync up the '60s-era Bond mythos (casual misogyny and all) with the more complicatedly "Bourne"-inflected recent episodes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    West is far more adept at and interested in sustaining an unrelentingly ominous mood than in executing the genre-required spook shocks.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A mesmerizing study in excess, Peter Jackson and company's long-awaited prequel to the Lord of the Rings saga is bursting with surplus characters, wall-to-wall special effects, unapologetically drawn-out story tangents and double the frame rate (48 over 24) of the average movie.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Best seen on the big screen; even those with a cursory grasp of avant-garde cinema are likely to come away with their minds opened and altered.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What’s past is prescient, and what it all means is beside the point. Let’s just say Bujalski has made a prankishly out-of-time movie about that other AI: mankind.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film suddenly gains in power, until it fulfills the promise of its title with hard-hitting compassion and a crystal-clear sense of grace.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaking is patient and participatory, getting down in the dirt with the workers (in one case the lens is even soaked by a spray of sludge) and allowing several touchingly distinct personalities to emerge.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jendreyko elegantly sketches in the details of his subject's life and the historical events surrounding her coming-of-age-out of which emerges a fascinating subtext about the malleable powers of language.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Meier is clearly carving out a path all her own; the next one should be a gem.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Hollywood movies have rarely spoken such tough and tender truths.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though the film wraps up its spinning-plates narrative a little too neatly, this is still a Scandi-noir to die for.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Oppenheimer keeps the film focused on the highly complicated Anwar — a charismatic devil if ever there was one — observing as this strange reckoning with the past slowly breaks down his defenses.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The real drama in Parnassus comes from the troupe of sideshow performers, led by a terrifically morbid Christopher Plummer.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A complex final scene — in which everyone finally lets the tears flow — only deepens the sense that well-meaning mother love can be as poisonous as it is nourishing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is a life lived, perhaps not always well, but certainly to the fullest.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The unspoken theme underlying Dickens’s prose--that the money-grubbing Ebenezer is conversing with semblances of his own self--finds near-perfect cinematic expression through Carrey’s efforts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s another fascinating entry in the director’s ongoing exploration of the sadistic and masochistic facets of human behavior.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Director Christian Carion (Merry Christmas) establishes a low-key yet threatening atmosphere right from the start, and gets terrific performances from Kusturica and Canet.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's an equally insightful and excruciating journey, with our quip-ready protagonist perpetually caught between two modes: eager-to-please caffeinated and near-breakdown frustrated.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It really packs a punch (bet you saw that one coming).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Despite his repentance, you sense that this lost soul will be confessing his sins for all eternity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There are few artists better than Rivette at uncovering the magical (even at its most menacing) in the everyday.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The first part of Deathly Hallows has plenty of invigorating imagery alongside the pro forma narrative elements.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What emerges is an illuminating, though terribly dismaying, portrait of the War on Terror’s lasting effects. Whether one retreats or steps out defiantly, there is no sanctuary.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    First-time director Josh Trank, working from a taut script by Max "Son of John" Landis, indulges in some wild, witty spectacle, but he's equally adept with the tale's grimmer elements, especially when the introverted Andrew unleashes his inner Magneto and uses the city of Seattle as his tear-it-apart emotional playground.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It isn't the first time death has figured in an Allen movie, but the way he grapples with it here (leaving each character at a moment of irresolution comparable to staring down the man with the scythe) is much more potent and direct.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The running time may make you blanch, but Connie Field’s seven-part documentary about the history and eventual dissolution of South African apartheid is well worth the commitment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The lengthy final two shots (each running more than ten minutes) rank among the best work this inimitable artist has ever done.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Coleman's life and work are treated as a continuum, which Clarke pulls from at will.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It still works its way under your skin and, by the time the highly disturbed Frank’s casualties come back to haunt him en masse, cuts sanguinely to the heart.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's a contemporary movie musical that makes you feel genuinely sky-high.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Puzzling and provocative, Alps has a lingering power and an effect that is thrillingly difficult to define.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A lesser movie might hammer home the idea that the cult squashes Martha's sense of self. This distinctive and haunting effort implies something much scarier: that there is no self to start with.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The oft-hilarious push-and-pull between director and subject - Williams wryly notes that the film is turning into "the Steve and Paulie Show" - effectively hacks away at the celebrity-enthusiast divide. By the end of this perceptive dual portrait, both men are content to merely be human.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This potent emotional undercurrent goes a long way toward counteracting the movie’s clumsier moments, carrying us aloft to a finale that, in its strange mix of trepidation and tenderness, is truly sublime.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A moving meditation on history, knowledge and mortality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Ferrara’s unconventional methods only manage to serve Chelsea on the Rocks, his loving portrait of Manhattan’s boho landmark, the Chelsea Hotel.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The mostly dialogue-free middle section is a scare-film master class - and when a becalmed smile does finally cross his lips, it's in the most giddily mordant of circumstances. As Arthur embraces the darkness, so does the darkness embrace us.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A 25-words-or-less pitch for The Day He Arrives - shot in luminous black-and-white - might go something like: "Hong Sang-soo does Groundhog Day."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Scorsese, that sly spiritualist, is out to make us sick on commerce and greed run rampant. He moves us beyond the allure of avarice so that we might take better stock of ourselves. What starts as a piggish paean becomes, by the end, an invigorating purge.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Del Toro and Amalric’s concentrated performances — the former resigned and shell-shocked, the latter agitated and servile — have an anguished grandeur.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Spelling may not be Quentin Tarantino’s forte, but his grasp of language (both verbal and visual) is peerless.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What follows is pulp made near-profound through director Jonathan Mostow’s sure-handed guidance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    An Arabic-German coproduction, it is a rare movie shot entirely in Saudi Arabia, which has no cinema industry to speak of, and the first feature by a female filmmaker from that country. Forbidden from mixing with the men in her crew, Al-Mansour often directed via walkie-talkie from the back of a van.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Thompson's imagination-she's also the screenwriter-knows no bounds, and she does a brilliant job of connecting the fantastical elements to the sobering realities of life during wartime.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is prime Woody Allen - insightful, philosophical and very funny.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The effort is commendable and the complicated emotions of the piece (for a place and a people) come through loud and clear. To paraphrase the great Ms. Russell, the movie has the power to make you laugh and the power to break your heart in half.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It will test your faith in humanity, but Hersonski's film is nonetheless a brilliant reminder of the importance of bearing witness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The sights are gorgeous—a seamless mix of archival imagery and impressively rendered digital views of our galaxy—and the science is, to layman’s eyes and ears, more than credible.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the time the beast spreads his wings to full span, soaring skyward toward a vaguely Spielbergian moon, you’re in the kind of breathless awe that so few current cinematic superproductions are able to provide.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the end, you feel curiously closer to the performer and her process without having any clue how you got there. It's exhilarating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The creepiness builds with symphonic precision until reality truly is indistinguishable from fantasy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s high time Pedro had a lark. The buoyant and bawdy I’m So Excited plays like a to-hell-with-it-all riff from this seminal Spanish auteur, an excuse to gather his stock company for a breezy 90-minute party.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Toward the end of the film, a few hard-hitting cuts between young and old brings the title's meaning home: These children have an inescapable life of drudgery before them, and there's little likelihood it will change anytime soon.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This lifelong Tintin fan was more than pleased, even while having to acknowledge that the movie lacks the subtle state-of-the-world commentary that Hergé often smuggled into his creation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even at a mere 75 minutes, Silent Souls is thrillingly dense and allusive, and the elegiac finale maintains the overall air of mystery while beautifully bringing all the disparate threads together.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jordan’s poetic sensibilities more than make up for any flaws. His uncanny aptitude for conjuring up resonantly metaphorical images — from a pointed fingernail pushing toward a vein to a waterfall turning into a literal river of blood — proves there’s plenty of life left in this undead genre.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As engrossing as it is maddening, Pierre Thoretton's documentary on the sale of Yves Saint Laurent's extensive art collection is perched somewhere between a sanded-edged official portrait and a keen examination of affluence run amok.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Losier has made a quietly revolutionary work that treats a pair of people on the fringes with the decency all humans deserve.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The impressively lean script by Alex Garland (28 Days Later) is shorn of almost all superfluity beyond a few dud Schwarzeneggeresque kiss-offs, while Anthony Dod Mantle's sensational widescreen cinematography harkens back to the tension-inducing inventiveness of early John Carpenter.

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