For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 In the Family
Lowest review score: 20 I Don't Know How She Does It
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A cut above most nonfiction explorations of Katrina, thanks to the ever-empathetic Demme's talent for showcasing the uniquely human qualities of every person he films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The movie might very well have come off as a too-clinical experiment if it weren't for Leo, who maintains a rivetingly mysterious aura even as her character's behavior becomes increasingly bizarre.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The impressively lean script by Alex Garland (28 Days Later) is shorn of almost all superfluity beyond a few dud Schwarzeneggeresque kiss-offs, while Anthony Dod Mantle's sensational widescreen cinematography harkens back to the tension-inducing inventiveness of early John Carpenter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Meier is clearly carving out a path all her own; the next one should be a gem.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Skyfall has the feel of both a ceremonial commemoration and a franchise-rebooting celebration, especially in the ways it attempts to too cutely sync up the '60s-era Bond mythos (casual misogyny and all) with the more complicatedly "Bourne"-inflected recent episodes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A mesmerizing study in excess, Peter Jackson and company's long-awaited prequel to the Lord of the Rings saga is bursting with surplus characters, wall-to-wall special effects, unapologetically drawn-out story tangents and double the frame rate (48 over 24) of the average movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As in his much-lauded "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," the latest feature from Palme d’Or–winning filmmaker Cristian Mungiu takes a rigorous approach to the material. But where the previous film — about two women seeking a back-alley abortion — was a reductively dour slog, Beyond the Hills feels more caustically all-encompassing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There are few artists better than Rivette at uncovering the magical (even at its most menacing) in the everyday.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The man himself has rarely been profiled without noticeable reluctance, though documentarians Molly Bernstein and Alan Edelstein delve fairly deep by allowing their subject to guide them where he may.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Delon and Crenna paint an idealized portrait of masculine camaraderie, one that’s exposed at the end of Melville’s bracing last testament as a soul-shattering illusion.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Hollywood movies have rarely spoken such tough and tender truths.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The creepiness builds with symphonic precision until reality truly is indistinguishable from fantasy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It still works its way under your skin and, by the time the highly disturbed Frank’s casualties come back to haunt him en masse, cuts sanguinely to the heart.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s high time Pedro had a lark. The buoyant and bawdy I’m So Excited plays like a to-hell-with-it-all riff from this seminal Spanish auteur, an excuse to gather his stock company for a breezy 90-minute party.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jordan’s poetic sensibilities more than make up for any flaws. His uncanny aptitude for conjuring up resonantly metaphorical images — from a pointed fingernail pushing toward a vein to a waterfall turning into a literal river of blood — proves there’s plenty of life left in this undead genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Every monster-movie archetype is here, from nerdy scientists (Charlie Day and Burn Gorman) to hard-stare leaders (Idris Elba) with a penchant for 11th-hour inspirational speeches. (Watching the former Stringer Bell bellow about “canceling the apocalypse!” is one of those great, giddy pleasures you didn’t know you needed.)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What’s past is prescient, and what it all means is beside the point. Let’s just say Bujalski has made a prankishly out-of-time movie about that other AI: mankind.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Oppenheimer keeps the film focused on the highly complicated Anwar — a charismatic devil if ever there was one — observing as this strange reckoning with the past slowly breaks down his defenses.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Not a bad setup for a cops-and-robbers thriller, and in the hands of action-movie maestro Johnnie To, the result comes very close to greatness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The sights are gorgeous—a seamless mix of archival imagery and impressively rendered digital views of our galaxy—and the science is, to layman’s eyes and ears, more than credible.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is truly De Palma–ville, and the filmmaker’s remake of Alain Corneau’s tale of corporate bloodletting, "Love Crime" (2010), is a welcome return to the carnal shockers that he does so well.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    An Arabic-German coproduction, it is a rare movie shot entirely in Saudi Arabia, which has no cinema industry to speak of, and the first feature by a female filmmaker from that country. Forbidden from mixing with the men in her crew, Al-Mansour often directed via walkie-talkie from the back of a van.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The effort is commendable and the complicated emotions of the piece (for a place and a people) come through loud and clear. To paraphrase the great Ms. Russell, the movie has the power to make you laugh and the power to break your heart in half.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a sense that all the thematic messiness is intentional, a way for Jia to diagnose the ills of a country whose economic and social fabric is wilting under the effects of rapid modernization.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Exploitative as this may seem in theory, it works beautifully onscreen, mostly because of Binoche’s radiantly complicated humanity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The point, of course, is to get lost. As the soft-spoken sage himself notes, “The world is a very puzzling place.” What a pleasure it is, the film suggests, to be perpetually befuddled.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the time the beast spreads his wings to full span, soaring skyward toward a vaguely Spielbergian moon, you’re in the kind of breathless awe that so few current cinematic superproductions are able to provide.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s almost impossible to describe the narrative specifics of The Past without making the movie seem ridiculously hammy. Indeed, several twists involving Samir, a dry cleaner with plenty of his own troubles, tip a bit into hoary melodramatics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Scorsese, that sly spiritualist, is out to make us sick on commerce and greed run rampant. He moves us beyond the allure of avarice so that we might take better stock of ourselves. What starts as a piggish paean becomes, by the end, an invigorating purge.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The real beauty of Maidentrip is how it downplays the go-for-glory aspect of the tale (this adolescent mariner’s aim is to become the youngest person ever to sail around the world) to focus on more earthly matters like the isolation and loneliness of the voyage or the lingering effects of the divorce that irrevocably shaped Dekker’s life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though Stranger by the Lake leans a bit too heavily on its long-take, slow-cinema bona fides, there’s a clear purpose to Guiraudie’s rigorous perspective. He’s out to unearth the very potent (and often terrifying) emotions underlying every explicit act, sexual or otherwise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Del Toro and Amalric’s concentrated performances — the former resigned and shell-shocked, the latter agitated and servile — have an anguished grandeur.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A complex final scene — in which everyone finally lets the tears flow — only deepens the sense that well-meaning mother love can be as poisonous as it is nourishing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is a life lived, perhaps not always well, but certainly to the fullest.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s nice to see this great filmmaker sculpting something that feels genuinely revelatory. That’s not to say that the 3-D Goodbye to Language is always an easy sit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Bellocchio counters these flaws with an energetically combative aesthetic (he makes you feel like you’re riding out a sociopolitical tempest, careening between perspectives) and an overarching humanism that gives equal weight to the many feelings stirred up by this hot-button situation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Like :Carnage,: it’s a bit of a minor lark until a deliciously grotesque finale pushes it into the realm of such kinkily profound Polanski films as: Cul-de-sac: (1966) and "The Tenant" (1976). By that point, you can’t help but submit to the perversity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The director’s latest—a lighthearted romance set in 1920s Germany and France—won’t do much to sway proponents or detractors from their own perspectives, though taken at face value, it’s one of Allen’s most charmingly conceived and performed efforts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    In comparison with near-impenetrable Garrel efforts like "Regular Lovers" (2005) and "Frontier of the Dawn" (2008), Jealousy cuts straight to the heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s another fascinating entry in the director’s ongoing exploration of the sadistic and masochistic facets of human behavior.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This potent emotional undercurrent goes a long way toward counteracting the movie’s clumsier moments, carrying us aloft to a finale that, in its strange mix of trepidation and tenderness, is truly sublime.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The lengthy final two shots (each running more than ten minutes) rank among the best work this inimitable artist has ever done.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Crank’s Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor direct with their usual flashy brio, and basso profundo Keith David has a sublime cameo as a cop indignant at the thought of a pistachio peanut butter sandwich. It’s that kind of movie, folks.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It helps that Fame has been cast with performers who have the glow of possibility about them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Antal and his performers’ pure B-movie esprit is undeniable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    9
    Sobering stuff for an animated movie that pitches itself somewhere between cutesy children’s entertainment and hectoring Grimm’s fairy tale. The problem with 9, though, is that it lacks a consistent tone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The question lingers as the movie comes to its triumphant body-swapping close: Is this a pro-environment parable or a prophecy of virtual realities yet to come? Cameron's new world may very well be a verdant Matrix.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Often resembles a prime John Carpenter thriller--call it "Assault on Manger 13"--until an overcaffeinated angel-fu climax significantly lowers the intelligence quotient.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s unfortunate that the result is so unaffecting, especially in light of all the things the director does right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The doc’s breakout star is Vogue creative director Grace Coddington, a former model whose plain appearance (the end result of a horrible car accident) and frumpy clothing belie her genius for fashion. She counters her boss every chance she can get and provides the film with a much-needed emotional center.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Less deadpan spoof than loving act of possession, Black Dynamite near-fully channels the look and feel of its blaxploitation ancestors, warts and all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    If you’ve seen "Species," you know where this don’t-mess-with-Mother-Nature horror show is going, though director-cowriter Vincenzo Natali has a few interesting twists up his sleeve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Horse Boy comes off as both an edifying work of advocacy and an invasive home movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Visual Acoustics goes out of its way to remain as kindly and pleasing as Shulman himself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Adela’s troubles feel slight and underdeveloped in the face of the world around her; it’s all too appropriate, in the end, that nature swallows her whole.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Cage is not quite Aguirre or Fitzcarraldo in the Big Easy. But his performance hits all the right mythopoetic beats, rising above the thin script and late-night-cable aesthetic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s no room for such soul-searching uncertainty with Gibson. After a few rapidly ticked-off minutes of gloom, the mission is clear: Get the sons of bitches, and make ’em pay.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Terrific performances and superb cinematography (by Claire Denis’s right hand, Agnès Godard) lift cowriter-director Ursula Meier’s feature debut above its thuddingly metaphorical premise.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a kick to see Cera cut loose from his patented befuddled-nerd routine, even if the film’s caricatured performances and fish-in-a-barrel scorn are sure to be monotonous for some.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All the retroactively enlightened symbolism gets monotonous, and reaches an absurd apex with the introduction of a party-line newspaperman played by that scowling emblem of Teutonic depravity, Ulrich Tukur.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Somewhat underwhelming sequel.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    John Travolta breaks the braggadocio meter in the latest tightly wound actioner from "Taken’s" Pierre Morel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike Romero’s film, what’s missing is a trenchant sense of connection to our historical moment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film lurches through narrative incidents: Battle scenes, political intrigue and a ticking-time-bomb love triangle are all pitched at the level of mundane competence and rarely get the blood racing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is one case where there’s more life in the morgue than out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like so many Doors chroniclers, DiCillo can’t help but fall under the singer’s spell; it’s understandable, but frustrating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    About as deep as a kiddie pool, which isn't to say it's an unpleasant frolic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    One senses this is a production better suited to the stage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A believably unbalanced Bening scores the movie’s true coup: Karen’s revitalizing relationship with a sweetly persistent coworker (Jimmy Smits) is a rare example of Hollywood doing right by midlife romance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When The Father of My Children shifts focus to Grégoire’s wife (Caselli) and children (the eldest is beautifully played by De Lencquesaing’s actual daughter, Alice), Hansen-Løve’s hand steadies, and she reveals a true talent for intimate, behavioral observation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmakers do a good job of laying out the whos, whys and wheres through diagrams, reenactments and testimonials from veterans on both sides of the skirmish.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The aural and visual overload that marks most of the director's work is here in spades--few documentaries look and sound so distinctive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The setup is pure Looney Tunes, and indeed, Despicable Me is at its best when trading in the anything-for-a-laugh prankery that was a specialty of the Termite Terrace crowd.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Her (Angela Ismailos) heart's in the right place, but her subjects' ruminations demand a much larger canvas.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Never quite shakes its sitcom-ish setup. The director alternates incident-laden storytelling with penetrating character moments that her terrific cast acts to the fullest.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The sights and sounds are splendid--a lovingly hand-detailed portside city, a touching musical interlude in a windswept field--though they're largely disconnected from the narrative proper.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's prime B-movie material put through the Ridley Scott Cuisinart.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The casting, from lead roles to supporting, is uniformly terrific.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is the kind of movie in which it's considered the zenith of meta-wit to have a slumming Robert De Niro (as Machete's racist politico nemesis) drive a taxi.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Gould is as much of a mystery at the end as at the beginning. You get the feeling that's the way he'd have wanted it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson makes often-inspiring use of the 3-D effects.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The intention outweighs the execution, though there are still pleasures to be had.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film never entirely overcomes the sense that it's a calling-card vehicle.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Our fury is never directed toward concrete solutions, and that allows the guilty parties to slip, perhaps permanently, from our grasp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Strikingly picturesque locations and a terrific ensemble cast help this tonally inconsistent adaptation of Posy Simmonds's comic series pass by with relative ease, though it leaves a very peculiar aftertaste.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    RED
    It's the casting, stupid!
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are plenty of formulaic boo! moments, yet Craven intelligently treats Bug's otherworldly issues like hormonal growing pains that must be tamed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's so much right with Gareth Edwards's low-budget alien invasion tale that you almost want to brush aside everything that's not up to snuff.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Depardieu and Cornillac's sibling rivalry, which segues between mostly verbal smackdowns and liquored-up bursts of merriment, is beautifully observed, as is the relationship between the detective and his devoted wife (the wonderful Marie Bunel). The thriller stuff, by comparison, is just a lot of perfunctory deadweight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    People who like their comedies pitch black (we're talking midnight, no stars or moon) should get a kick out of the tale of Steven Russell (Carrey).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Someone surely thought to call this knowingly ridiculous genre mash-up "Cowboys vs. Ninjas," though even that title wouldn't hint at all the you-gotta-be-kidding-me craziness on display.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The divas rule in this glossy musical.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Disney knows how to bewitch a crowd, but the sense that Tangled was made more by corporate mandate than artistic spark remains constant throughout.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For everything admirable, like the way female Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana (the wonderful Gakire) resigns herself to a violent death, there's a heavy-handed metaphor-a cute gaggle of orphaned goats-ready to smack away the intelligence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The fancifulness wears out its welcome, though, and you often wish the film would treat its subject with a bit more seriousness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the duo will work their way back to each other is never in doubt, although Chazelle doesn't succumb to easy sentiment. If anything, he moves too far in the other direction, aiming for a wizened ambiguity that doesn't entirely come off.

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