For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Closed Curtain
Lowest review score: 20 Abduction
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Polanski has made a genre piece with a verve and vitality that’s in sadly short supply.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The tone this time out is primarily comic.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s almost impossible to describe the narrative specifics of The Past without making the movie seem ridiculously hammy. Indeed, several twists involving Samir, a dry cleaner with plenty of his own troubles, tip a bit into hoary melodramatics.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a sense that all the thematic messiness is intentional, a way for Jia to diagnose the ills of a country whose economic and social fabric is wilting under the effects of rapid modernization.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Like :Carnage,: it’s a bit of a minor lark until a deliciously grotesque finale pushes it into the realm of such kinkily profound Polanski films as: Cul-de-sac: (1966) and "The Tenant" (1976). By that point, you can’t help but submit to the perversity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The man himself has rarely been profiled without noticeable reluctance, though documentarians Molly Bernstein and Alan Edelstein delve fairly deep by allowing their subject to guide them where he may.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Bellocchio counters these flaws with an energetically combative aesthetic (he makes you feel like you’re riding out a sociopolitical tempest, careening between perspectives) and an overarching humanism that gives equal weight to the many feelings stirred up by this hot-button situation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s nice to see this great filmmaker sculpting something that feels genuinely revelatory. That’s not to say that the 3-D Goodbye to Language is always an easy sit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave hoping he ultimately found peace and enlightenment, two things he graciously gave to those of us who hung on his every word.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    In comparison with near-impenetrable Garrel efforts like "Regular Lovers" (2005) and "Frontier of the Dawn" (2008), Jealousy cuts straight to the heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The real beauty of Maidentrip is how it downplays the go-for-glory aspect of the tale (this adolescent mariner’s aim is to become the youngest person ever to sail around the world) to focus on more earthly matters like the isolation and loneliness of the voyage or the lingering effects of the divorce that irrevocably shaped Dekker’s life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be risible if Ozon’s hand didn’t remain so steady and confident throughout, all the way up to a complicatedly upbeat conclusion that recreates the Christian Annunciation with the straightest of faces.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This fascinatingly knotty movie never becomes a facile screed against the powers that be. Instead, it plays as a more relaxed and leisurely requiem for a slowly vanishing way of life, with sounds and images-a time-lapse contemplation of the cosmos is in the running for scene of the year-that are as mesmerizing as they are subtly pointed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The point, of course, is to get lost. As the soft-spoken sage himself notes, “The world is a very puzzling place.” What a pleasure it is, the film suggests, to be perpetually befuddled.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A movie with an unflinchingly tough heart.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    When the action eventually switches to an Austrian rehab retreat, Dalle gets to make like the best of the Old Hollywood divas and waste away with devastating reserve - an icon quietly, crushingly crashing to earth.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Do you like movies about gladiators? Well, lend me your ears: The Eagle will more than gratify your sword-and-sandal cravings.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even the stoniest face will crack when Aladeen sums up our cultural moment in a rousing, uproarious climactic speech worthy of both Chaplin and Team America.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be a Christmas miracle save for one lump of coal: an ear-shattering Justin Bieber song over the end credits. Gotta sell something to the kids at Yuletide.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though Stranger by the Lake leans a bit too heavily on its long-take, slow-cinema bona fides, there’s a clear purpose to Guiraudie’s rigorous perspective. He’s out to unearth the very potent (and often terrifying) emotions underlying every explicit act, sexual or otherwise.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Not a bad setup for a cops-and-robbers thriller, and in the hands of action-movie maestro Johnnie To, the result comes very close to greatness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Too many movies come to us as preordained cult objects - this is the real deal.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson's romantic fantasia is after something much more complicated and profound-an ever-renewing balance between the hopes of youth and the disappointments of age.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What most distinguishes the redo is the often remarkable use of 3-D: Miike turns the format's inherent limitations, especially the tendency toward visual murkiness, to his advantage, fully immersing us in a world suffused with moral and ethical rot.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Chomet builds this beguiling symphony of sadness to a poignant finale that does ample justice to the many layers of Tati's tale, both in text and out.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The director’s latest—a lighthearted romance set in 1920s Germany and France—won’t do much to sway proponents or detractors from their own perspectives, though taken at face value, it’s one of Allen’s most charmingly conceived and performed efforts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Watching the formerly spry Harris struggle to maintain a normal life (he's frequently glassy-eyed and jacked on painkillers) emphasizes the underappreciated sacrifices our men and women in uniform make in the name of vaguely defined ideals.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Delon and Crenna paint an idealized portrait of masculine camaraderie, one that’s exposed at the end of Melville’s bracing last testament as a soul-shattering illusion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's in between the lines that this movingly perceptive film scores a TKO.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's easy to think of comics, especially time-tested ones like Rivers, as mechanical laugh-generators. Stern and Sundberg allow her to reveal the deep-rooted humanity of those ever-present quips, and the effect is humbling.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is truly De Palma–ville, and the filmmaker’s remake of Alain Corneau’s tale of corporate bloodletting, "Love Crime" (2010), is a welcome return to the carnal shockers that he does so well.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensation trumps cogitation-unsurprising in a Hollywood production-which doesn't negate the enduring allure of this beautiful bauble.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Yun is quite simply spectacular as a woman who holds steadfastly on to her dignity and empathy, even in the face of unspeakable tragedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    One thing’s certain: This is no swoony love story. It intoxicates all the same.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Taken on its own fun-over-philosophy terms, this is an exercise in tone-shifting virtuosity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fassbender and his multifaceted allure helps counteract any thematic or conceptual shakiness, as was the case in McQueen's highly uneven debut, "Hunger." One thing's for sure: McQueen has found his De Niro, and he better keep him close.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Leigh does a stellar job of showing how these events seep into the unaware girl's everyday existence - almost all of the film's sequences are photographed in precisely composed, inherently surreal single shots.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    New Yorkers and those who've been following the neighborhood's plight know exactly how this ends; at the very least, Paravel and Sniadecki have preserved the memory of what was. Sometimes, that's the most you can do.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A cut above most nonfiction explorations of Katrina, thanks to the ever-empathetic Demme's talent for showcasing the uniquely human qualities of every person he films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The movie might very well have come off as a too-clinical experiment if it weren't for Leo, who maintains a rivetingly mysterious aura even as her character's behavior becomes increasingly bizarre.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film builds to a shattering climax that works precisely because all involved fully embrace the melodrama. Be sure to bring Kleenex.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As in his much-lauded "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," the latest feature from Palme d’Or–winning filmmaker Cristian Mungiu takes a rigorous approach to the material. But where the previous film — about two women seeking a back-alley abortion — was a reductively dour slog, Beyond the Hills feels more caustically all-encompassing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It never feels as if we're watching a brand-name cash-grab, but instead as if we're participating in an endlessly imaginative afternoon of play.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Every monster-movie archetype is here, from nerdy scientists (Charlie Day and Burn Gorman) to hard-stare leaders (Idris Elba) with a penchant for 11th-hour inspirational speeches. (Watching the former Stringer Bell bellow about “canceling the apocalypse!” is one of those great, giddy pleasures you didn’t know you needed.)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is an exquisite portrait of a family navigating the wreckage imparted to them by one of their own.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The haphazardness of the film's structure mutes the power of the subjects' recollections.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Depardieu and Cornillac's sibling rivalry, which segues between mostly verbal smackdowns and liquored-up bursts of merriment, is beautifully observed, as is the relationship between the detective and his devoted wife (the wonderful Marie Bunel). The thriller stuff, by comparison, is just a lot of perfunctory deadweight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Aatsinki siblings never rise past a kind of rotely anonymous masculinity, and overall the film tends to lull rather than engage the senses.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A too-pat ending also spoils Rubberneck (shorter: Mommy made me do it!), though it doesn’t ruin the steely pleasures of the filmmaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike a great Morris film such as "Gates of Heaven" or "Mr. Death," where the quirks of character feel connected to a larger, profoundly insightful vision of humanity, Tabloid never gets beyond its idiosyncratic surface.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though often funny, there’s a reverse narcissism in the way Karpovsky wallows in his “character’s” off-putting flaws.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Tariq Tapa-who shot much of this vérité-style film by himself-does a beautiful job attuning us to Dilawar's drifting routine, but what's especially striking is how he gives equal weight to the supporting characters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    No new ground is broken, and viewers will, not unpleasantly, get everything they expect. It’s apparently morning in America again.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The more that fright-flick conventions take over, the more the movie's recognizable and resonant human fears are dulled.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The question lingers as the movie comes to its triumphant body-swapping close: Is this a pro-environment parable or a prophecy of virtual realities yet to come? Cameron's new world may very well be a verdant Matrix.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Never quite shakes its sitcom-ish setup. The director alternates incident-laden storytelling with penetrating character moments that her terrific cast acts to the fullest.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The scenes of the film’s exuberant, frizzy-haired protagonist wandering Naples and revisiting old haunts, however, seem much more unfocused—a ramshackle search for insights into the man’s art and life that rarely come. The instruments are in tune, but the rhythm is off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hopper keeps things light and off-the-cuff, allowing his performers free rein - sometimes too much, as in the case of the screechy and shrill Farrell - to explore grim territory without falling into heavy-handedness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What keeps you watching is the charisma of the performers: Hamm does an amiable riff on his Don Draper persona (he’s cynical before the big melt), Lake Bell is a delight as his tart-tongued love interest, and Sharma and Mittal are all charm as the cultures-uniting underdogs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What really matters is seeing these pretty people get put through the gory wringer, and once the unholy spirit comes calling, Evil Dead more than delivers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's not much beyond all the fawning, but the effusively talented Channing more than deserves the gush.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    People who like their comedies pitch black (we're talking midnight, no stars or moon) should get a kick out of the tale of Steven Russell (Carrey).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ai is a great subject for a documentary, and his charismatic certitude helps to offset Klayman's unfortunate inexperience behind the camera.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though the tale demands a darker outcome, the director disappointingly goes the Mouse House happy-ending route with a reprise of the original short film's finale - one that somehow plays with even more cringeworthy sentimentality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The jarring juxtapositions only heighten the enigmatic air of the film's subject; even when he's right in front of us, he seems to be plotting his next wily act.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Visual Acoustics goes out of its way to remain as kindly and pleasing as Shulman himself.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer this "Abbott and Costello's Lethal Weapon" goes on, the more the fun dissipates - until a queasily violent climax, which, naturally, fully embraces genre stereotypes rather than dismantling them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the duo will work their way back to each other is never in doubt, although Chazelle doesn't succumb to easy sentiment. If anything, he moves too far in the other direction, aiming for a wizened ambiguity that doesn't entirely come off.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A believably unbalanced Bening scores the movie’s true coup: Karen’s revitalizing relationship with a sweetly persistent coworker (Jimmy Smits) is a rare example of Hollywood doing right by midlife romance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As subcultural anthropology, it’s unassailable. Yet the often ugly-looking DV aesthetic dilutes the cumulative effect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can't help feeling that an initially adventurous movie has had its rough edges sanded away.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    RED
    It's the casting, stupid!
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's enough filmmaking talent evident throughout that you wish the journey were more satisfying overall.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the story takes a murderous turn, things quickly fall apart. Too many perfunctory side characters, such as Dennis's clueless parole officer, dilute any sense of tension; the bargain-basement visuals-all overlit interiors and unmotivated zooms-never rise above the luridly cheap; and hoo-boy, those final scenes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine "His Girl Friday" crossed with "Armageddon" and you’ll get a sense of the unfortunate disconnect that prevents an enjoyable light entertainment from achieving rom-com nirvana.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The setup is pure Looney Tunes, and indeed, Despicable Me is at its best when trading in the anything-for-a-laugh prankery that was a specialty of the Termite Terrace crowd.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie’s admirable fleetness, however, doesn’t mitigate some of its narrative errors — Alexander’s opening voiceover suggests his family is totally oblivious to his role in their misery, which is disproved by a later scene — nor does it counteract an overall sense of slightness that prevents this from being a family-film classic.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The early scenes of Gabe Ibáñez’s impressively mounted but uneven thriller do some terrific dystopian world-building.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The overall effect is not unlike watching a chef de cuisine experimenting in his off-hours; not everything takes, but you still come away with a pleasingly stimulated palate.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Stick with the film, though, and you might find yourself strangely moved by its oddball mix of ripe melodrama, overwrought violence and regional verisimilitude.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are plenty of formulaic boo! moments, yet Craven intelligently treats Bug's otherworldly issues like hormonal growing pains that must be tamed.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The belly laughs do come, many of them courtesy of the mechanical bird companion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The uniformly showy performances (Acting with a capital ‘A’) are what do in Prisoners more than anything.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    About as deep as a kiddie pool, which isn't to say it's an unpleasant frolic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When The Father of My Children shifts focus to Grégoire’s wife (Caselli) and children (the eldest is beautifully played by De Lencquesaing’s actual daughter, Alice), Hansen-Løve’s hand steadies, and she reveals a true talent for intimate, behavioral observation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately Coppola’s sensitivity is always evident, especially in the open-hearted performances she gets from Roberts and Kilmer (whose father, Val, has a funny, pot-addled cameo).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The divas rule in this glossy musical.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's fascinating to be so close to a then-sitting head of state as he negotiates for his homeland's survival, and the news that Nasheed was recently deposed in a coup by Gayoom loyalists makes the hard-won victories he did secure all the more poignant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is not a choice made lightly by anyone involved, but the admirable, multilayered toughness of these sequences is unfortunately weakened by the filmmakers’ saccharine touch whenever they explore the doctors’ personal lives.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Miners' is tiresome and scattershot.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The subjects - a husband and wife struggling to make ends meet, mostly for the well-being of their infant daughter - are eminently engaging.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Inventive yet exhausting tale of two circus clowns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Subtlety is not this movie's strong suit; even the terrific Chemical Brothers score pounds your nerves a bit more than it should.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Somewhat underwhelming sequel.

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