For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 National Gallery
Lowest review score: 20 Late Bloomers
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    They have little feel for the technical side of filmmaking; the imagery is flat and the editing amateurish. Most shots seem held for a beat too long or too short, wreaking havoc with the comic rhythm. Nonetheless, McCarthy and Falcone’s attempts to make Tammy more flesh-and-blood than a figure of fun are often poignant.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Expertly conjured atmosphere only gets Muschietti so far, but there's enough genuine promise here that you're willing to cut this talented newcomer some slack.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike Romero’s film, what’s missing is a trenchant sense of connection to our historical moment.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Marvin Kren’s enjoyable if ephemeral horror movie gets by for a while on its dopey premise.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like so many Doors chroniclers, DiCillo can’t help but fall under the singer’s spell; it’s understandable, but frustrating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Cage is not quite Aguirre or Fitzcarraldo in the Big Easy. But his performance hits all the right mythopoetic beats, rising above the thin script and late-night-cable aesthetic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Still, if any modern strip is worthy of an extended, Hobbes-style tongue bath, it’s this one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s no real pleasure in any of the musical performances. And when married to the scenes exploring Hendrix’s tumultuous personal life—particularly his semi-abusive relationship with long-term girlfriend Kathy Etchingham (Hayley Atwell)—you’re left with a monotonously grim portrait that’s more rewarding in theory than execution.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The doc’s breakout star is Vogue creative director Grace Coddington, a former model whose plain appearance (the end result of a horrible car accident) and frumpy clothing belie her genius for fashion. She counters her boss every chance she can get and provides the film with a much-needed emotional center.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Carell and Wiig make a splendid vocal pair — Nick and Nora Charles with ice guns and lipstick Tasers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The intention outweighs the execution, though there are still pleasures to be had.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a fine line between modesty and inconsequence, and this low-key, primarily improvised feature from mumblecore staple Joe Swanberg mostly blurs the divide.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    So many blockbuster movies are impersonal, micromanaged hashes that Jack, with its bare minimum of craft and commitment, comparatively comes off like a diamond in the rough.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    John Travolta breaks the braggadocio meter in the latest tightly wound actioner from "Taken’s" Pierre Morel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it still works like gangbusters - tears will be stifled by the end of the sibling vs. sibling finale - and most of the credit should go to Hardy, Nolte and Edgerton.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    But take the puppet off his arm and he seems somehow vague and incomplete, like the Wizard of Oz without his curtain.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    These scenes make you wish the rest of the movie had similar bite, but Gibney tends toward that dutiful doc style that mixes talking heads and archival clips into a flavorless stew—a bland complement to Fela’s zesty on- and offstage presence.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A Euro gloss on "Pretty Woman" suddenly turns into "Occupy Gaul."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All of this is fascinating in the moment, yet the doc never yokes all these threads into anything particularly deep or illuminating. The Galapagos Affair is less social commentary, more gossip.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like all of Tarsem's films, story takes a backseat to visuals, and there's plenty to pop the eyes-love those life-size string-puppet assassins!-if not, ultimately, to stir the soul.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When it comes to scenes in which characters are asked to say more than two words, however, the filmmaker's a decided amateur; Moretz, in particular, seems hopelessly stranded as the attitudinal wild child.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Horse Boy comes off as both an edifying work of advocacy and an invasive home movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Joe
    Yet Green, as is his wont, too often strains for poetic effect through flowery voiceover and tone-deaf interactions — like those between Joe and his latest short-term girlfriend — that undercut the genuineness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer the film goes on, the more it seems like a collection of gorgeous images without an overall organizing structure. Our youthful lead’s slow disillusionment with his complicated surroundings ultimately plays less profound than petulant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Israel-Palestine conflict is reduced to a crystalline, though still complicated, essence in Nadav Schirman’s alternately tedious and engrossing documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the rote plot takes over - the tension brought on by the film's you-are-there verisimilitude quickly devolves into soapily overwrought theatrics.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The brotherly-love epiphany to which the film builds does effectively pluck the heartstrings, but there’s a lingering sense that we’re being had.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Maier’s images are truly stunning—vivid documents of the working class that are off-the-cuff yet rigorously composed, always capturing that enigmatic bit of her subject’s soul that leaves you in spine-tingled awe.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Mouth’s dubious legacy and his many off-camera complications are examined with a coarse affection of which he himself would surely approve.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    They (Bullock/McCarthy) deserve a much stronger showcase than this Laurel & Hardy Go Policin’ vehicle.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You’re thankful when Ayer stops trying to artistically tart up this Peckinpah-lite tale of vengeance and just lets his leading man do what he does best: blow the bad guys away.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Don't go in expecting scares so much as laughs. Scream 4 is a better "Scary Movie" than any of the "Scary Movies" ever were, from its inventively gut-busting kills (watch out for that mail slot!) to the unintentionally humorous sight of the three leads acting as if they're in three separate films.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie feels like too much of a lark. To paraphrase the play’s voice of reason, Friar Francis, it would be better if Whedon paused awhile and let his counsel sway us more.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The fancifulness wears out its welcome, though, and you often wish the film would treat its subject with a bit more seriousness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is a movie that preaches to its rafters-raising choir.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly though, it feels like we're watching a superficial gloss on Goodman's CV rather than a probing interrogation of his legacy. For the choir only.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is hardly a symphony of terror, but it’s still a solidly composed exercise in suspense.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s no room for such soul-searching uncertainty with Gibson. After a few rapidly ticked-off minutes of gloom, the mission is clear: Get the sons of bitches, and make ’em pay.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Here, though, everyone involved seems above the rom-com conventions they’re satirizing, so anxious to get to each punch line that they let the connective tissue languish. You howl often but quickly forget why.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ed Harris is a performer made for Westerns, and he’s perfectly utilized in debuting director Michael Berry’s middling if still very watchable modern-day oater as Roy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The kids pick up the filmmakers' lyrical slack more often than not, but this ode to the power of verse could really use a redraft.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though its insights are slight-the movie feels as delicate and ephemeral as its sleepy winter surroundings - you can't help but admire the overall generousness O'Brien shows to his characters and performers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Clooney occasionally shows a surer hand: He gets great work from Downton Abbey’s Bonneville — notably in an emotionally charged scene revolving around Michelangelo’s Madonna of Bruges — and has a fine monologue himself, in which Stokes dresses down a high-ranking German commander (a moving encapsulation of the American spirit at its best).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Disney knows how to bewitch a crowd, but the sense that Tangled was made more by corporate mandate than artistic spark remains constant throughout.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Melodrama often risks the ridiculous to achieve the sublime, and though this unabashedly earnest tearjerker doesn’t completely transcend its narrative absurdities, it’s enough of a distinctively odd duck to keep you engaged.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Teegarden and McDonell make up for the hand-me-down plotting with a sweet, unaffected chemistry.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The sights and sounds are splendid--a lovingly hand-detailed portside city, a touching musical interlude in a windswept field--though they're largely disconnected from the narrative proper.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Both Robert and Gus seem defined purely by their eccentric speech patterns, and it takes a while for the duo to register as anything other than acting-exercise conceits. But once the story takes a defiantly odd turn into thriller territory (really an excuse to hole up two talented thespians in a single location), the affected nature of the performances becomes a virtue.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For everything admirable, like the way female Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana (the wonderful Gakire) resigns herself to a violent death, there's a heavy-handed metaphor-a cute gaggle of orphaned goats-ready to smack away the intelligence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can’t help but feel all the palpable joy is eliding some darker realities that would lend the copious musical performances a deeper resonance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave impressed at the way Stanton fiercely protects the aura of mystery that makes him such an indelible onscreen presence.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    9
    Sobering stuff for an animated movie that pitches itself somewhere between cutesy children’s entertainment and hectoring Grimm’s fairy tale. The problem with 9, though, is that it lacks a consistent tone.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Someone surely thought to call this knowingly ridiculous genre mash-up "Cowboys vs. Ninjas," though even that title wouldn't hint at all the you-gotta-be-kidding-me craziness on display.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Quentin Tarantino showcased her bubbly personality (and ass-kicking dexterity) in 2007’s terrific gearhead horror movie, "Death Proof." Now, seasoned stuntwoman Zoë Bell gets a vehicle all her own—a disposable battle royal no-budgeter that’s immensely elevated by her presence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Adela’s troubles feel slight and underdeveloped in the face of the world around her; it’s all too appropriate, in the end, that nature swallows her whole.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The story beats are as familiar as they come, and there are a few halfhearted stabs at redeeming Roberts’s clueless character when it would have been better to push her feeble-mindedness to Anna Faris–esque extremes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmakers do a good job of laying out the whos, whys and wheres through diagrams, reenactments and testimonials from veterans on both sides of the skirmish.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Watching this see-in-the-dark muscleman brooding against gorgeous otherworldly vistas, all while crafting pointy homemade weapons and befriending a scene-stealing CGI canine (no joke), is a sci-fi aficionado's delight.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For an animation studio that too often specializes in the frivolous and glib (begone, Shrek series!), the move to the dark side is refreshing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's commitment to representing the harsh truths of an unfortunate historical moment is admirable, but it tends to grate rather than illuminate.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a kick to see Cera cut loose from his patented befuddled-nerd routine, even if the film’s caricatured performances and fish-in-a-barrel scorn are sure to be monotonous for some.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    In many ways, this effervescent drama from Susan Seidelman (Desperately Seeking Susan) upends conventions, even when it sticks to a familiar narrative path.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That T.J. and his family willingly allow this headbanging psycho(analyst) to move into their cluttered, dankly lit abode-the emotional damage is palpable, yo!-is just one of the film's many eyebrow-raising contrivances.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fists fly furiously and much blood is spilled; there's a sacrifice via sword that's both cringe-inducing and cheerworthy. Even special guest star Jackie Chan gets in on the fun with a hilarious bit of food-jitsu. It's almost enough to make you forget that this entertainingly hollow film is populated entirely with toy soldiers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Loznitsa would have done better to embrace the story’s enigmas as opposed to explicate them.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Lovingly designed, but dramatically inert.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The directors rarely go beyond the experiential to provide larger, lasting insight into the journey's generational and historical importance. As such, the comedown from this Trip is a real bitch.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the faux-realist aesthetic (gritty handheld camerawork; all-natural sound), we never feel like much is at stake, though Pistereanu and Condeescu have an easygoing rapport that makes the quieter moments between them affecting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Polisse builds to one of the most hilariously misguided climaxes ever conceived; let's just say that this soapy symphony of squalor literally doesn't stick the landing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    We certainly need all the ecological jeremiads we can get. But must they be so numbingly pedantic?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film adheres closely to a well-reviewed theater production cocreated by and starring Andre Gregory and Wallace Shawn, both of whom get to riff on their prickly "My Dinner with Andre" rapport.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Viewers familiar with Daniels’s idiosyncratically vulgar work might be disappointed that there’s little here that compares to Nicole Kidman loosing a yellow stream on Zac Efron’s jellyfish stings in "The Paperboy" (2012).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The laughs are purely surface; the film's women's-lib pretensions seem grafted on as if to lend significance to a story that would benefit from a lighter, less cerebral touch. Still, it's hard to resist La Deneuve's charms.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    May’s biggest get, however, is Ciavarella himself—a man forever rationalizing his shady actions, who emerges as a more complexly tragic figure than you’d think possible.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The good news is that the film's stylistic excesses don't negate the many fascinating aspects of Nim's story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Belvaux's tension-building setup is stellar; the follow-through, less so.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The survey the film provides is bracing, and there are plenty of talking heads to guide us through the kaleidoscope of imagery. Unfortunately, there’s also a public-television vibe to the proceedings that mutes the overall power. It’s essential info presented with little imagination.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Other than ludicrously pulpy fun, Anonymous, true to its title, ultimately signifies nothing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once Pip reaches the big city, Newell starts losing the dramatic focus, piling on incidents and revelations with a bombastic force that makes it seem as if we’re watching a cheap 19th-century telenovela.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Our fury is never directed toward concrete solutions, and that allows the guilty parties to slip, perhaps permanently, from our grasp.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ticking-time-bomb suspense is not Nair’s forte, so she relies on Michael Andrews’s Middle East–inflected score to do most of the heavy lifting in the present-day scenes, which feel shapeless and perfunctory.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    13
    Aside from some character-defining flashbacks, a godawful score and sweat-enhancing color photography, it's the same movie as before - a divertingly tense yet superficial time-waster.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Drooling fanboys and "Buffy"-loving academics are sure to go wild — not that there’s anything wrong with that…right? Stoker is a gorgeous wank job; just prepare to hate yourself for loving it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The casting, from lead roles to supporting, is uniformly terrific.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film never entirely overcomes the sense that it's a calling-card vehicle.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Adams gets a delectable onscreen partner in Justin Timberlake as a novice scout who takes an interest in Mickey. Even the old half-naked-moonlight-swim gambit feels fresh with these two involved.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is a movie about a subculture, made for that subculture; only hard-core Xboxers need apply.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The documentary's scope feels a bit small overall - more concerned with capturing the episodic adventures of these disparate subjects than with connecting their experiences to larger societal ills.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Strikingly picturesque locations and a terrific ensemble cast help this tonally inconsistent adaptation of Posy Simmonds's comic series pass by with relative ease, though it leaves a very peculiar aftertaste.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anna Wintour? Feh! There never was, and never will be, a style icon quite like Diana Vreeland.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    None of the hilarity is enough to keep Wanderlust from feeling like a late-night comedy-show sketch stretched to feature length. But why look a giggle-prone gift horse in the mouth?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mud
    Despite the best efforts of a cast that mixes unstudied newbies such as The Tree of Life’s Sheridan with Hollywood prima donnas like Reese Witherspoon (a starlet-slumming-it distraction as Mud's dim-bulb inamorata), there’s an overall clunkiness that Nichols is unable to overcome.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Carice van Houten (Black Book) is superb as the emotionally unstable Jonker - all manically beaming highs and depressively gloomy lows, a tempestuous force of nature in a movie that too often plays it blandly polite.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Even this terrifically talented performer can't sell a Shyama-lana-ding-dong of a third-act twist that will make more eyes than heads roll.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s bleakness in the beauty: What begins as a personal coming-of-age story ends as a tragic tale of a community’s stunted adolescence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's an all-embracing openness here that belies the often cold and calculating characters she plays onscreen. She's the perfect confluence of brains and beauty, and it's a pleasure to be in her company.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anyone who has ever loved a television show can see that Thomas and his crew are working overtime to give VM aficionados everything they want.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The major change is that the domestic, Eun-yi (the great Jeon, star of "Secret Sunshine"), is now more of a victim than an aggressor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ultimately, this feels like a hagiographic official portrait that takes the sting out of the proverbial bee.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Gould is as much of a mystery at the end as at the beginning. You get the feeling that's the way he'd have wanted it.

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