For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Neil Young Journeys
Lowest review score: 20 The Wait
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tony Scott almost wins us over with this fun thrill ride.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the faux-realist aesthetic (gritty handheld camerawork; all-natural sound), we never feel like much is at stake, though Pistereanu and Condeescu have an easygoing rapport that makes the quieter moments between them affecting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The major change is that the domestic, Eun-yi (the great Jeon, star of "Secret Sunshine"), is now more of a victim than an aggressor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    We certainly need all the ecological jeremiads we can get. But must they be so numbingly pedantic?
    • 23 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's sure-to-be-brief theatrical release is a mere stopover on the way to basic-cable eternity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Chu does his best to humanize his subject, showing him surrounded by devoted friends and family, and wringing much drama from an on-the-road vocal-cord strain.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Tariq Tapa-who shot much of this vérité-style film by himself-does a beautiful job attuning us to Dilawar's drifting routine, but what's especially striking is how he gives equal weight to the supporting characters.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Lovingly designed, but dramatically inert.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The laughs are purely surface; the film's women's-lib pretensions seem grafted on as if to lend significance to a story that would benefit from a lighter, less cerebral touch. Still, it's hard to resist La Deneuve's charms.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Begins in the land of lunacy and ends up somewhere on the far side of deranged.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What begins as a tense, inventive suspense film becomes, to paraphrase Doctor Who, a wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey, mushy-wushy mess. That's decidedly NOT fantastic.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The belly laughs do come, many of them courtesy of the mechanical bird companion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Subtlety is not this movie's strong suit; even the terrific Chemical Brothers score pounds your nerves a bit more than it should.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Don't go in expecting scares so much as laughs. Scream 4 is a better "Scary Movie" than any of the "Scary Movies" ever were, from its inventively gut-busting kills (watch out for that mail slot!) to the unintentionally humorous sight of the three leads acting as if they're in three separate films.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Teegarden and McDonell make up for the hand-me-down plotting with a sweet, unaffected chemistry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Two monologues-one in which the Hobo compares himself to a bear, the other a Travis Bickle–like screed delivered to a roomful of increasingly distressed babies-are damn near Shakespearean. It's a shame the performance is contained in a Z-movie patchwork that's a bit too knowingly repugnant.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That T.J. and his family willingly allow this headbanging psycho(analyst) to move into their cluttered, dankly lit abode-the emotional damage is palpable, yo!-is just one of the film's many eyebrow-raising contrivances.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The kids pick up the filmmakers' lyrical slack more often than not, but this ode to the power of verse could really use a redraft.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For an animation studio that too often specializes in the frivolous and glib (begone, Shrek series!), the move to the dark side is refreshing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's commitment to representing the harsh truths of an unfortunate historical moment is admirable, but it tends to grate rather than illuminate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As to the movie's three sections, the best comes first, as an eclectic "cast" of characters (among them philosopher Alain Badiou and musician Patti Smith) pontificate their way around a lavish Mediterranean cruise ship.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That One Lucky Elephant ultimately comes down on the side of anthropomorphizing Flora and her kind is extremely disappointing - a little clear-eyed ambivalence would have helped the film feel more focused and less like patchwork.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The falsely euphoric close is a big misstep - Pulitzers, it would seem, are the ultimate Band-Aid. What was that old adage about printing the legend?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The good news is that the film's stylistic excesses don't negate the many fascinating aspects of Nim's story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Belvaux's tension-building setup is stellar; the follow-through, less so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike a great Morris film such as "Gates of Heaven" or "Mr. Death," where the quirks of character feel connected to a larger, profoundly insightful vision of humanity, Tabloid never gets beyond its idiosyncratic surface.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's especially disappointing when the story takes an inevitable turn to starry-eyed mush, dulling the sharp satire of the crazy, stupid ins and outs of romantic entanglement with an unconvincingly saccharine one-true-love-for-all moral.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The directors rarely go beyond the experiential to provide larger, lasting insight into the journey's generational and historical importance. As such, the comedown from this Trip is a real bitch.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's hard to hate a movie that affectionately references the oeuvre of Kathryn Bigelow (both The Hurt Locker and Point Break!) and uses a whiny Third Eye Blind ballad as an acidic punch line.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The subjects - a husband and wife struggling to make ends meet, mostly for the well-being of their infant daughter - are eminently engaging.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Inventive yet exhausting tale of two circus clowns.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's secret weapon proves to be Freddy Krueger–fingernailed witch Marique, whom Rose McGowan plays with the kind of fuck-it-all brio - imagine a cross between Madeline Kahn in "History of the World: Part I" and Lady Gaga - that should garner her a Razzie and an Oscar.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The jittery aesthetic is a bit grating - there's a three-cut minimum per roundhouse kick - but the spectacularly named Olivier Megaton (Transporter 3) still manages to deliver the action-film goods.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When the monsters finally show themselves, this potent theme is lost amid a lot of proficiently staged but insubstantial scare scenes - heavy on musical stingers and weightless CGI.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As the Sherlock Holmes of the second Zhou Dynasty, Lau is so effortlessly appealing that he manages to anchor the fatigue-heavy proceedings, even when his character has to outrun both the rays of the sun - don't ask - and a collapsing statue while crawling over and under a pack of stampeding horses. Now that's star power.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it still works like gangbusters - tears will be stifled by the end of the sibling vs. sibling finale - and most of the credit should go to Hardy, Nolte and Edgerton.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fists fly furiously and much blood is spilled; there's a sacrifice via sword that's both cringe-inducing and cheerworthy. Even special guest star Jackie Chan gets in on the fun with a hilarious bit of food-jitsu. It's almost enough to make you forget that this entertainingly hollow film is populated entirely with toy soldiers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is still a fascinating history, especially when Limelight touches on the club scene's dark side: A lengthy dissection of the Angel Melendez murder, complete with an appearance by weathered-looking killer Michael Alig, chillingly shows how the out-all-night lifestyle can take its toll.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Weekend settles into an intentionally minor-key groove, caught somewhere between bracingly direct honesty and cringingly mumbly pretense.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When it comes to scenes in which characters are asked to say more than two words, however, the filmmaker's a decided amateur; Moretz, in particular, seems hopelessly stranded as the attitudinal wild child.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the filmmaker at least makes a concerted effort to tweak what in most hands would be an offensively whitewashed dark-continent parable is worth some measure of praise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    But take the puppet off his arm and he seems somehow vague and incomplete, like the Wizard of Oz without his curtain.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly though, it feels like we're watching a superficial gloss on Goodman's CV rather than a probing interrogation of his legacy. For the choir only.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Other than ludicrously pulpy fun, Anonymous, true to its title, ultimately signifies nothing.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    13
    Aside from some character-defining flashbacks, a godawful score and sweat-enhancing color photography, it's the same movie as before - a divertingly tense yet superficial time-waster.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's an all-embracing openness here that belies the often cold and calculating characters she plays onscreen. She's the perfect confluence of brains and beauty, and it's a pleasure to be in her company.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is no family-friendly "Peanuts" special.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The story's half-baked environmental themes become more prevalent as Letters from the Big Man progresses to its back-to-nature finale, which unfortunately distracts from Munch's consistently sure hand with his actors.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaker's work is infinitely more exhilarating when he's relieved of the need to be in any way serious. He should play dumb more often.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The jarring juxtapositions only heighten the enigmatic air of the film's subject; even when he's right in front of us, he seems to be plotting his next wily act.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still can't help admiring the project's ambition; an odd combo of "Babe: Pig in the City" and Godard's "Histoire(s) du cinéma," Hugo is the strangest bird to grace the multiplex in a while.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A Euro gloss on "Pretty Woman" suddenly turns into "Occupy Gaul."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fincher's film tips much more in the indulging direction of crowd Comic-Con - delighting the franchise junkie above all other considerations.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Well, Ghost Protocol ultimately ends up as an eye-rollingly towering totem to L. Ron's favorite son, complete with treacly music cues and longing glances - bromantic and otherwise - that will send you screaming into the thetan-stealing clutches of Lord Xenu.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    More stupid movies should leave you with such a blissfully stupid smile.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Comparable works like John Gianvito's "Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind," or nearly anything from cine-essayist Chris Marker's oeuvre, mine similar territory much more rewardingly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Moment to moment, the film is gripping and beautiful to behold (props to cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi for the mesmerizingly grainy, achromatic visuals). But caveat emptor to those expecting a hinterlands gloss on "Taken" with rapacious curs in place of nefarious Albanians.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's not much beyond all the fawning, but the effusively talented Channing more than deserves the gush.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Miners' is tiresome and scattershot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    None of the hilarity is enough to keep Wanderlust from feeling like a late-night comedy-show sketch stretched to feature length. But why look a giggle-prone gift horse in the mouth?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Carice van Houten (Black Book) is superb as the emotionally unstable Jonker - all manically beaming highs and depressively gloomy lows, a tempestuous force of nature in a movie that too often plays it blandly polite.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Even this terrifically talented performer can't sell a Shyama-lana-ding-dong of a third-act twist that will make more eyes than heads roll.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer this "Abbott and Costello's Lethal Weapon" goes on, the more the fun dissipates - until a queasily violent climax, which, naturally, fully embraces genre stereotypes rather than dismantling them.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    In many ways, this effervescent drama from Susan Seidelman (Desperately Seeking Susan) upends conventions, even when it sticks to a familiar narrative path.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's fascinating to be so close to a then-sitting head of state as he negotiates for his homeland's survival, and the news that Nasheed was recently deposed in a coup by Gayoom loyalists makes the hard-won victories he did secure all the more poignant.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Like all of Tarsem's films, story takes a backseat to visuals, and there's plenty to pop the eyes-love those life-size string-puppet assassins!-if not, ultimately, to stir the soul.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For all the undeniable imaginativeness and visual dazzle (this is Maddin's first entirely digital feature, and it positively glistens), Keyhole ultimately comes off like a feature-length private joke that revels a bit too gleefully in its overall inscrutability. Close, Guy. But no Double Yahtzee.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can't help feeling that an initially adventurous movie has had its rough edges sanded away.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Shots of the kids and their friends running around unfamiliar environments have the fantastical qualities of Spike Jonze's "Where the Wild Things Are," minus the forced whimsy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Polisse builds to one of the most hilariously misguided climaxes ever conceived; let's just say that this soapy symphony of squalor literally doesn't stick the landing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is a movie about a subculture, made for that subculture; only hard-core Xboxers need apply.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The rousing speeches and booming battle scenes are all well done as far as blockbuster spectacle goes, but you can't help but feel the filmmakers' resistance to the story's grimmer undercurrents.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fans of Moulin Rouge–esque repurposing will be in hog heaven. Everyone else will want to hop that midnight train going anywhere pronto.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The troubling turns the story takes, which are meant as a rebuke to happily-ever-after stereotypes, are much more interesting in conception than they are in execution.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though the story's wrapped-with-a-bow finale is never in doubt-ol' Meathead remains a populist, pandering Hollywood man through and through-Belle Isle still manages to cast enough of an enchanting spell.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Both Robert and Gus seem defined purely by their eccentric speech patterns, and it takes a while for the duo to register as anything other than acting-exercise conceits. But once the story takes a defiantly odd turn into thriller territory (really an excuse to hole up two talented thespians in a single location), the affected nature of the performances becomes a virtue.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the rote plot takes over - the tension brought on by the film's you-are-there verisimilitude quickly devolves into soapily overwrought theatrics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ai is a great subject for a documentary, and his charismatic certitude helps to offset Klayman's unfortunate inexperience behind the camera.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This handsomely made spook story (love those echo-prone hallways!) becomes less involving the more the narrative's mysteries are solved. By the time all the tarot cards are on the table, it's likely that you too will feel conned.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Filho so completely calculates his causes and effects, even going so far as to have the villain of the piece literally swimming with sharks, that you never fully feel the senses-altering charge of a truly impassioned polemic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    After the story takes a cloyingly sentimental turn, this lean-and-mean thriller becomes bathetically bloated. Just a few spokes short of a wheel, guys.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unfortunately, Kim nearly wrecks the film's observational acuteness with a climax that shamelessly steals from Bob Rafelson's classic blue-collar drama "Five Easy Pieces," and this faux-gut-punch finale feels haphazardly sutured on rather than arrived at organically. Guess that ham-fisted opening shot was a sign of things to come.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A study in simplicity, perhaps too much so. The writer-director is working in the same patiently observant vein as Argentine confederate Lisandro Alonso (Liverpool), especially in the intriguing early scenes, where the adults communicate mostly through furtive glances and expertly modulated body language.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Adams gets a delectable onscreen partner in Justin Timberlake as a novice scout who takes an interest in Mickey. Even the old half-naked-moonlight-swim gambit feels fresh with these two involved.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anna Wintour? Feh! There never was, and never will be, a style icon quite like Diana Vreeland.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The documentary's scope feels a bit small overall - more concerned with capturing the episodic adventures of these disparate subjects than with connecting their experiences to larger societal ills.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though the tale demands a darker outcome, the director disappointingly goes the Mouse House happy-ending route with a reprise of the original short film's finale - one that somehow plays with even more cringeworthy sentimentality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Walken is particularly alive in a way he's rarely been since "Catch Me if You Can," adding untold shades to Hans's mystery-shrouded past - wait until you see what's under his cravat - while still giving his singularly eccentric line readings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Getting old's a bitch. But the long-in-the-tooth quintet (Chaplin, Fonda, Guy Bedos, Claude Rich and Pierre Richard) at the center of Stéphane Robelin's featherweight French comedy has it all figured out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tediousness sets in eventually; there's only so much zoological abyss-gazing one can do.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This aesthetically undistinguished yet still engrossing documentary follows the emotionally charged lead-up to the vote on Question One, a 2009 Maine referendum that put the marriage rights of gay and lesbian couples on the state ballot.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's numerous idiosyncrasies - virtues at the outset - ultimately suffocate it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The four leads more often than not transcend the material's calculated moroseness; Ivanir is especially good as a man whose perfectionist facade masks a soul in perpetual turmoil.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The more that fright-flick conventions take over, the more the movie's recognizable and resonant human fears are dulled.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it's impossible to shake the sense that what felt thrillingly, cohesively alive in the director's earlier movies plays here with more laurel-resting creakiness than go-for-broke verve. Russell's once-mercurial assets have become a formula.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's almost worth wading through the wearisome setup to get to the fun stuff. But there is a reason fast-forward buttons were invented.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, there are a good number of Yen-choreographed action scenes to break up the monotony.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hyde Park could have been fawningly ponderous; that it's merely an airy trifle puts it a cut above the usual Oscar bait.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though its insights are slight-the movie feels as delicate and ephemeral as its sleepy winter surroundings - you can't help but admire the overall generousness O'Brien shows to his characters and performers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Expertly conjured atmosphere only gets Muschietti so far, but there's enough genuine promise here that you're willing to cut this talented newcomer some slack.

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