For 640 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done
Lowest review score: 0 The Do-Over
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 52 out of 640
640 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Such a feature-length bludgeoning, even in the service of basic social and scientific literacy, is truly discomfiting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For all of Cloud Atlas's pseudorevolutionary blather about upending the "natural order," the execution couldn't be squarer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This aesthetically undistinguished yet still engrossing documentary follows the emotionally charged lead-up to the vote on Question One, a 2009 Maine referendum that put the marriage rights of gay and lesbian couples on the state ballot.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tediousness sets in eventually; there's only so much zoological abyss-gazing one can do.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Getting old's a bitch. But the long-in-the-tooth quintet (Chaplin, Fonda, Guy Bedos, Claude Rich and Pierre Richard) at the center of St├ęphane Robelin's featherweight French comedy has it all figured out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Walken is particularly alive in a way he's rarely been since "Catch Me if You Can," adding untold shades to Hans's mystery-shrouded past - wait until you see what's under his cravat - while still giving his singularly eccentric line readings.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though the tale demands a darker outcome, the director disappointingly goes the Mouse House happy-ending route with a reprise of the original short film's finale - one that somehow plays with even more cringeworthy sentimentality.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Meier is clearly carving out a path all her own; the next one should be a gem.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    The film slowly reveals its true colors, pointing a fanatically accusatory finger at teachers' unions while using twisted Obama-esque sloganeering about "order" and "hope" to further its simplistically anticollectivist agenda.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The documentary's scope feels a bit small overall - more concerned with capturing the episodic adventures of these disparate subjects than with connecting their experiences to larger societal ills.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anna Wintour? Feh! There never was, and never will be, a style icon quite like Diana Vreeland.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Adams gets a delectable onscreen partner in Justin Timberlake as a novice scout who takes an interest in Mickey. Even the old half-naked-moonlight-swim gambit feels fresh with these two involved.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The impressively lean script by Alex Garland (28 Days Later) is shorn of almost all superfluity beyond a few dud Schwarzeneggeresque kiss-offs, while Anthony Dod Mantle's sensational widescreen cinematography harkens back to the tension-inducing inventiveness of early John Carpenter.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The movie might very well have come off as a too-clinical experiment if it weren't for Leo, who maintains a rivetingly mysterious aura even as her character's behavior becomes increasingly bizarre.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A cut above most nonfiction explorations of Katrina, thanks to the ever-empathetic Demme's talent for showcasing the uniquely human qualities of every person he films.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A study in simplicity, perhaps too much so. The writer-director is working in the same patiently observant vein as Argentine confederate Lisandro Alonso (Liverpool), especially in the intriguing early scenes, where the adults communicate mostly through furtive glances and expertly modulated body language.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lynskey has raised the quality of innumerable feature films (as a soft-spoken New Republic reporter in Shattered Glass; a housewife on the verge of a nervous breakdown in Away We Go-that film's sole saving grace). So it's a delight to see this stalwart character actor move to center stage, even when the result is so by-the-numbers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unfortunately, Kim nearly wrecks the film's observational acuteness with a climax that shamelessly steals from Bob Rafelson's classic blue-collar drama "Five Easy Pieces," and this faux-gut-punch finale feels haphazardly sutured on rather than arrived at organically. Guess that ham-fisted opening shot was a sign of things to come.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Coleman's life and work are treated as a continuum, which Clarke pulls from at will.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    After the story takes a cloyingly sentimental turn, this lean-and-mean thriller becomes bathetically bloated. Just a few spokes short of a wheel, guys.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Filho so completely calculates his causes and effects, even going so far as to have the villain of the piece literally swimming with sharks, that you never fully feel the senses-altering charge of a truly impassioned polemic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    Interminable scenes of macho posturing and mock-Tarantino dialogue (including a lengthy dissection of the word fags!) mark time between a number of ineptly staged car chases that would embarrass the makers of "Cannonball Run II."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This handsomely made spook story (love those echo-prone hallways!) becomes less involving the more the narrative's mysteries are solved. By the time all the tarot cards are on the table, it's likely that you too will feel conned.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It is the richly evocative performances of Marion (aggressive yet enticing) and Merhar (wearing world-weariness like an aged suit) that cut deepest.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The haphazardness of the film's structure mutes the power of the subjects' recollections.

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