Kenji Fujishima

Select another critic »
For 133 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 70% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kenji Fujishima's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 91 Right Now, Wrong Then
Lowest review score: 10 Honeyglue
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 67 out of 133
  2. Negative: 31 out of 133
133 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Kenji Fujishima
    Hong’s two-part structure in Right Now, Wrong Then, instead of just being a cute formal trick, reveals a character’s troubled inner life in fiendishly clever ways.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Kenji Fujishima
    Sion Sono's film is a vision of coming of age as trial by fire, a thunderous encapsulation of that period of transition in which adolescents try to discover themselves: their passions, their purpose, their sense of morality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Kenji Fujishima
    A film full of fascinating contradictions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Chiemi Karasawa's documentary is remarkable for its candor, but it's a brutal honesty that Elaine Stritch herself gladly offers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Brendan J. Byrne's documentary about Bobby Sands colors its familiar formal lines with welcome intelligence.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Among the film's many revelations is the level of self-aware humility Brando exudes while talking about his life and creative process.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Stephen Chow's distinctive vision is evident in the seemingly boundless imagination of his scenarios, and in the film's sincere spiritual concerns and generosity toward misfits and outsiders.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    '71
    It distinguishes itself from Pual Greengrass's films by virtue of its close attention to political and moral ambiguities.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Instead of finding one consistent tone and sticking to it, Serge Bozon allows the wildly hilarious and the grimly serious to uneasily coexist, exulting in the resultant clash.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    The film recalls its stylistic forbears at their best: flowing with whimsy, but never at the expense of the beating heart of its human (and animal) characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    The film ultimately succeeds in offering a fresh female-centered perspective on its genre material.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Gabe Polsky's quiet yet welcome achievement is to allow us to see the individual amid the politics, clearly and sympathetically.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Striking throughout are the seemingly caught-on-the-wing moments that subtly enrichen the film’s characterizations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    It constantly divides itself between fulfilling the conventions of the informational talking-heads documentary and aiming for a more poetically impressionistic quality.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Deepak Rauniyar may be more skilled dramatist than inspired image-maker, but his admirably balanced and humane social and political perspective is bracing nevertheless.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Though the film doesn’t quite overwhelm as horror, the thematic implications are dense enough in this case that it ends up leaving a lingering aftertaste anyway.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Arnaud Desplechin tries his hand at a coming-of-age tale, and does so with equal doses of mature reflection and youthful impetuosity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    By keeping explanatory talking-heads interviews to a minimum, the filmmakers put their trust in the audience to draw their own conclusions based on what they present to us.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    To some extent, the use of a wide aspect ratio and the doc's emphatic score takes its cues from paleontologist Pete Larson's passion.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Writer-director Joseph Cedar charts Norman's rise-and-fall arc with the attention to detail of a procedural.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Cristian Mungiu's film is more than just a cry of despair toward the hopelessness of life in modern-day Romania.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Chaitanya Tamhane's grand canvas is Indian society as represented by its legal system, and what it reveals is none too flattering.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    This singular mix of character study and mysterious mood piece might not have come off quite so successfully if not for Royalty Hightower's internal performance.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    This is muckraking journalism that moves confidently with the brio of an action thriller.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Here is a film that isn't afraid to risk didacticism in order to put across its vision of the debilitating physical and psychological effects of colonialism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    If nothing else, Heaven Knows What is one of the most harrowing cinematic depictions of drug addiction in recent memory, reliant less on formal gimmickry than on close observation of behavior.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    A coming-of-age journey of self-realization, made immensely more involving by virtue of being seen through its subject's first-person perspective.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    The film goes deeper in its allegorizing, tapping into the volatile nature of identity politics.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Failure hovers over the film as much as it did in Schulz's comic strip, infusing even its most ebullient set pieces and designs with a sense of melancholy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    With its broad performances, rapid-fire pacing, and rampant visual and verbal gags, Bernard Tavernier's first out-and-out comedy doesn't try too hard to hide its graphic-novel origins.

Top Trailers