Kimberley Jones
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For 677 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Past
Lowest review score: 0 Ultraviolet
Score distribution:
677 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It's huge and bewildering and it hurts to watch, but it hurts so good it's gorgeous.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a movie made of moments, the antithesis of "plot-driven," but the sum of these moments is magnificent, the culmination of so many elements: acting, scripting, score (by locals Michael Linnen and David Wingo), and cinematography.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    Do we ever get the whole truth? Only this: The past is never the past. In Farhadi’s wounding worldview, the past is the present and, most certainly, the future, too.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The Grand Budapest Hotel is nothing short of an enchantment.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The tension is enough to make you slightly sick, and the overall mood of the thing is deeply dispiriting, but then, nobody ever said that war isn't hell.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is an animated film that happily has room for both an existentialist dread of death and a grinning joie de vivre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Fish Tank isn't an easy watch – it's like two hours of ache – but there are rich rewards to be had in the many ways Arnold and her terrific team rend us to and fro.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I don't want to oversell the thing. It is, quite simply, something very special indeed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Moon doesn't belabor anything, really, so confidently measured and philosophically nuanced it all plays out (aided by a striking, under-the-skin original score by Clint Mansell).
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Bahrani's small marvel of a film.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I don't know if the many plot swerves withstand a second viewing, but I suspect the meat of the matter – the swooning visuals, the expert choreography, the teasing love story – does.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not quite as brutalizing as McEwan’s brilliant source novel – it bears too much of a Great Art buff – but it ravishes nonetheless in its grand exploration of the sins of the daughter and a lifetime spent making reparations.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The sum is something deeply profound: about awkwardness, culture clash, failed connections, and – ultimately – the strength that comes from surviving a trial by fire.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It packs a hefty emotional wallop.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Nothing short of majestic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all so goddamn realistic and reminiscent of real-life love (and how often does that happen onscreen?) that The Puffy Chair would be hell to watch if it weren't so funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and sweet and guaranteed to flood you with good feeling.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In its cinematic incarnation, Sex and the City has lost none of its bawdiness yet gained a more profound sense of soberness. Parker, especially, who in the last season of the show bordered on insufferable in her affected squeaks and shrieks, is allowed to go to very dark places – to be, in fact, quite unfabulous.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Vuillards, however fractured, know one another's rhythms and rituals, and Desplechin knows just how to convey them in the subtlest of ways.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Kazan appears in every scene of The Exploding Girl’s perfectly paced 80 minutes, and you’d miss her if she ducked out for even a moment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Dogme pedigree rarely distracts; there is too much emotional investment to care much about dogmatic fidelity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all about the little things, and the way in which the little things can steal into your heart in big ways.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Smart, uncanny, resistant to the short cuts of pop psychology, and shocking in the best since of the word, Steers' debut is a stunner.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A triumph in anguish.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The characters in The Claim suffer under the weight of very big things -- betrayal, abandonment, disease, death -- but they do so quietly, stoically, until, by God, they just can't take it anymore.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Sexy, sophisticated comedy that only occasionally falls short of its admirable ambition: that is, to be a fun, fizzy, razzle-dazzle thing. Straight to the moon, indeed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The actors, as a powerful and convincing ensemble, are equally understated and just as devastating.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Moments of almost unbearable beauty.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A film that wants you to get happy.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A lovely, quietly thrilling thing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A rare achievement.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This modest French-language film follows the time-honored cinematic tradition of plot as spearheaded by a simple twist of fate.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Delicious.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed more (sincerely, full-throatedly) at Toy Story 3’s smart comedy than at any other film of the still-young summer movie slate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Wright takes the tools of a bloodless medium, the video game, and crafts an action-comedy with a true-blue beating heart.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Blisteringly entertaining.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is a quest movie, with a lot of ground covered, and just as our heroes never stay long in one place or feel safe in their surroundings, neither does the audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In an age of doggedly unambitious comedy, one marvels at the finesse these first-time screenwriters and director Feig bring to marrying raunch, romantic comedy, and the tested but ever-true bond between women.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Grief doesn't exactly sound like a promising starting point for a love story, but, really, what a bounty Mills presents to us of beauty and buoyancy and possibility.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I can't remember the last time I felt so seduced by a film.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    One wishes for a chewier whodunit – there just aren't enough clues for the viewer to work with – and the reveal of the mole is perversely anticlimactic. But maybe that's just stickling. We always knew Smiley'd get his man.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly it's just terribly funny and sad and beautifully acted and terrifically feel-good for being, you know, a cancer comedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The film can feel a touch overscripted, but Polley and her actors effect true-to-life rhythms of speech.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Anderson and his co-writer Roman Coppola have crafted an elegant and emphatic metaphor for adolescence, that tumultuous province of firsts and lasts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Screamingly funny. Like I said, terrific stuff.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Looper makes a full-meal entertainment out of piecemealing genres: It boasts the kicky mental gymnastics that come with time-travel terrain, the relentless rapid heart rate of a crackerjack thriller, and the bursts of extreme violence, buttressed with black humor, of a modern actioner.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Equally harrowing and heartrending, Shame is a film that feels akin to going into battle, and I for one didn't emerge unscathed.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Shot in winter grays with no warming ambers and the whiff of tuberculosis hanging around all the players, Inside Llewyn Davis is a chilly thing – a nominal comedy in brisk shivers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Excepting the occasional shot that forces the eye on a particular dancer, Wenders largely films the action in a way that re-creates the effect of attending a performance in a proscenium theatre – only without having to scrabble for the best seat in the house. No matter where you are, you're already in it.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's a mistake to confuse Zero Dark Thirty for "truth" – that would be a disservice to the high level of craftsmanship, from first-billed actors to below-the-line production crew, at work in this movie fiction – but there is admirably little fat on its bones.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A manic, lithesome thing, 2 Days in New York flexes between broad comedy and a beautifully observed portrait of family life – especially life after death.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Audience fortitude aside: This is compulsively watchable stuff, a masterstroke of thoughtful direction and thought-provoking performance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The movie moves episodically, leisurely, through roughly a decade, and that feels like a gift: to nestle in with these extraordinary, ordinary people and get to know them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    And yet that is what is so very remarkable about the film: In a slim 72 minutes, it heart-tethers us to these teenagers, paying tribute to their unique and private selves while allowing the audience to see its own reflection in them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Her
    If in previous films "Adaptation" and "Being John Malkovich" Jonze seemed a little squirmy about sex, his treatment here is fully adult and keenly sensitive to the complexities of sexual intimacy – how it relates to emotional intimacy, whether or not a flesh-and-blood body is required to achieve it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Snowpiercer holds its own; it’s an unruly but rattling – and ravishing – work of art. On first watch, I wondered if there was anything to scratch beneath the surface – it seemed so straightforward, I worried there wasn’t enough there there – so I rewatched it almost right away and was surprised to find it still left me panting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A restless, nervy actor, Hardy seems to get a kick out of tying one hand behind his back. He dominated "The Dark Knight Rises" even with a modified ball gag obscuring most of his face. Here, locked behind a steeling wheel and a conceptual gimmick, he only has the upper half of his body to work with. No surprise to anybody who’s been paying attention: Half a Hardy adds up to a hell of a lot.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    God Help the Girl is not so perfectly crafted, but the promise – oh, the promise is irresistible.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The middle is terrific, especially in a lengthy, unassuming scene in which the three leads sit, sip drinks, and have a good chat: It marks one of the great celluloid pleasures of the year, so virtuosically written, performed, and filmed is it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    All told, The Young Victoria is a very well-made if not especially memorable picture, moving with all the grace and steadfastness of a waltz Victoria and Albert share, but absent any urgency or anything particularly exclamatory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A funny, seductive, and surprisingly honest dramatization of the ways we snooker ourselves into incompatible love.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The sights are ingenious, impressively rendered in 3-D, and the sounds – including cheeky voice work by Mr. T, Neil Patrick Harris, and Benjamin Bratt – are a blast.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The Hangover instantly has the feel of one for the ages.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Linklater has crafted an always genial and at times even joyful period charmer about that moment on the cusp: before a boy becomes a man and another man becomes a mythological figure.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Cotillard doesn't look part Native American or sound like a Thirties Chicago moll, but damned if she isn't a sight and sound to behold. Whatever her technical limitations, she rises above them to breathe a flesh, blood, and battered verisimilitude into the part. You can't tear your eyes off her, any more than you can Mann's flawed but still engrossing picture.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Why wait for 2012? If you're hankering for a taste of the apocalypse, the opening sequence of this eye-opening, stomach-queasing doc has plenty to go on – witness menacing superimpositions on a bleak, blighted landscape – and the hits just keep on coming.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The upshot to a ticking bomb is that it only explodes the once, but Rachel's sister, Kym (Hathaway), goes off again and again.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As with "Sunshine," I'd call Juno a family film if only it didn't make teen pregnancy look so sporting. Instead, we'll settle for that rare bird, an indie comedy that uplifts – funny and smart, totally trying to be cool and succeeding, and heartfelt to boot.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refn’s artful and energetic film never goes further than face value.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The fault does not lie with Hoffman (who doesn't so much act out Capote's distinctive mannerisms and high-pitched lisp as channel them); his performance is undeniably great. Everything else – solid, satisfying though it may be – falls short of that greatness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    But for all the film's griminess and doom, bad behavior and bad luck, it's hope that engines Head-On.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Forget life lessons: I much prefer a lemur king doing the robot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Happy Endings is unabashedly sentimental (cheekily couched in a black-comic guise), with Roos acting as a sort of benevolent god over his characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's the kind of movie that lives and dies by a viewer's own idiosyncrasies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Serenity evinces the kind of swashbuckling bonhomie that made so many of us fall in love with the original "Star Wars" films, a love that was mightily tested by George Lucas' humorless prequels.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    One wishes perhaps for a more thumping conclusion, but what we have instead is something perfectly in the spirit of the piece, reaffirming that life, big and little, happens in 10 minutes chunks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Quite astonishingly, amidst all the chaos – and there's no better word for Tristram Shandy's inspired, breakneck madness – what emerges is a featherlight, moving meditation on new fatherhood.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The only weak link here is Aniston's character – her Olivia, stuck in a holding pattern, feels like a holdover from Holofcener's previous, single-girl pictures, and Aniston underplays the role to the point of expressionlessness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There’s an undeniable thrill to watching something so experimental and yet totally accessible to those of us who speak only layman’s Dylanese, and it’s Haynes’ warmest film yet.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Pray maintains a steadfastly objective viewpoint, and it's a testament to his film's success that it can accommodate the audience's inevitably shifting allegiances from one family member to the next.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Post-viewing, I was still coasting on the giddy high of kinetic cinema, only to have the astonishing callousness of its conclusion slowly settle in. It's a better film for it – one only wishes that Reprise on a whole had been of the same mind: a little less cool, a little more cruel. That's where the really good stuff is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is at once elegant and sublimely silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film, a distinctly secular take on Waugh's religiosity, is far more interested in the battle of blind faith vs. rigid unbelief and its devastating effects. Herein, everyone is complicated – by their station, their philosophy, their God – and everyone is complicit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a rattling, heartrending performance (Moore) in, yes, a long, hard slough of a film – one that is well worth the journey, if not a repeat trip.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The deeply heartfelt Milk is more of a surface skim: a fairly standard biopic – if a very fine one, indeed – but never the transcendent work one would have hoped from the filmmaker or his subject.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Because Wendy and Lucy is so lean on plot and dialogue, there are long spaces to contemplate Wendy and her situation, and the logistics are mind-boggling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    They don't make women, sexy but regal, like Pfeiffer much anymore, and Cheri is quite a monument to her.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A staggering document of the lengths parents will go to for the sake of their child.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Hair is personal. It's also political.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There is, quite simply, a rather refreshing ordinariness to Remember Me in the unflashy, knuckle-down attention it gives to character development and the building of plausible and involving family and friend dynamics.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Going dramatic, Stiller commits to the role completely; there's something rather admirable in his refusal to pander or soft-pedal the self-serious, frankly unlikable Greenberg.