Kimberley Jones
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For 702 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 0 The Women
Score distribution:
702 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As much a portrait of a community as of its brilliant, de facto mayor, Harmontown is a stirring tribute to the restorative power of finding your people.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Wild lands some hard punches, but it can’t sustain the impact. Some of that lies in its inherited arc: Strayed found some peace – the whole point of the trek – but arriving-at-peace is less provocative than the struggle, at least in a movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A rattling and ruminative piece of speculative fiction, Ex Machina is good enough to wish it were even better.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The language barrier borders the Babel-esque; it’s a surprise fount of humor, too, as when a translator is terrified to pass along an Italian tailor’s request to the French-speaking chief seamstress, knowing she’ll be furious at the added work.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With all its emphasis on beat, Brown Sugar can't maintain a steady one, yet when it finds it, the film surely soars.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As obvious as they get, and it wears its message on its bloodied jersey.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and friendly and all-inclusive and unremarkable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Everybody likes to watch the messy guts-stuff of other peoples' lives, if only because we know then we're not alone in our weird ways.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Makes for a playfully enthralling hour and a half.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's the tortoise and the hare, Nepalese-style, and it's surprisingly dramatic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A nice-looking, nice-feeling exercise in conventionalism that sure could use a couple of transvestites and maybe a house falling from the sky.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Medem's film is a bleached-out beauty, hitting our most commanding human emotions -- lust to love to grief to rage and back again -- while only occasionally striking a wrong chord.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a dirty, ugly, joyless world these fathers and sons live in, and for all the passion involved, of retribution and a father's fierce love, Perdition is as emotionally distant as Sullivan. The feelings are all there, just submerged.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Throughout, the documentary is fun and engaging, even whimsical when using (to good effect) illustrations and Gilliam’s own storyboards.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all boils down to trying too hard, when everybody knows a good grift is one that appears effortless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As an experiment in mood, as a love song to Paris and to the French New Wave, as a fun, flirty little number, Charlie provides a giddy satisfaction.
    • Austin Chronicle
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Columbus never quite captures the depth, the rich complexities of Rowling's novels. She's written four Harry Potter books for kids that adults swoon for, too. Columbus has made two Harry Potter movies for kids … and we'll leave it at that. That isn't bad. But I suspect there's something better just around the bend.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The senseless violence of a Jean-Claude Van Dammer, no point to that, but this, this has purpose. This is an ass-kicking a girl can get into. So why do I feel like crying mea culpa?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somewhere in that chirpy half-pint frame dwell some meaty comic chops. Goldie Hawn may have found her successor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film also inspires, if unconsciously, the viewer to rethink what exactly constitutes art.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a goofy, tongue-in-cheek, my-gawd-how-could-we-be-so-dumb shrine, but a shrine nonetheless.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Falling in love with the wrong person makes for a far more toothsome melodrama, a fact this small, satisfying picture rightly recognizes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Authenticity is strangely lacking in Laurel Canyon, although Cholodenko’s exquisite eye for framing remains uncorrupted. Laurel Canyon is often visually captivating.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An admirable effort, but too many words, words, and more words, and not enough of the ache of that half-smile.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An absorbing human drama.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, either you get it or you don't. Film critics and senators with election prospects don't. Kids in the mood to laugh at stupid shit for 87 minutes do. I'll toss my hat in the latter ring with glee.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The latest installment in the Austin Powers series has stopped making much sense at all, but it sure gets its giggle on, and good.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Taking a cue from the horse in question, Ross’ film takes its time getting into the race, but once it gets going, the going gets good.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The darker stuff begs to be handled less delicately than this dance, and in that respect the director stumbles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Dreamers is infused with the same kind of wistful melancholy that made the French New Wave films so winning, and it’s all gorgeous to look at.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Saved! initially gets in some good gags at the expense of religious hypocrisy, it eases off, opting not to skewer religion but rather to poke it gently with a stick to see what happens.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What a glorious weepie The Notebook might have been if they’d just found a way to get rid of the damned notebook.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Affectionate but uninsightful biopic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To do no disservice to the impressive work of Bridges' co-stars, anytime his ragged writer, in flowing caftans and floppy hats, is on screen, it's impossible to take in anything else, so commanding is his presence.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What we get is more of the same from Ferrell – funny faces, goofy accents, pratfalls aplenty – and that ain't bad. It just could have been a lot better.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All herky-jerky camera movements and no pussyfooting around with the interior lives of these characters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film stumbles a bit in its third act, when war kills the good times for good.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Penn's Bicke is often so pitiable it's hard not to want to look away – but what else to expect from perhaps our most compulsively watchable contemporary actor?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Square peg, round hole. That's what the twentysomethings who drift through Margarita Happy Hour are like.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not foreign, but not in the sense of national demarcations of language and custom. It speaks a different cinematic language, one that tosses off the usual rules of camerawork and narrative structure.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With so many soldiers interviewed, some only fleetingly, it's impossible to keep track of them all.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Mercifully, the frosted icing-icky title bears little relation to the film's actual content.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The easy, fast-talking rapport between the four young women is The Sisterhood’s biggest selling point. Too bad, then, that the premise demands they spend most of the film away from each other.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    July sees the world in a most unexpected way, and it's a shame that Me and You's preciousness sometimes overwhelms that uniqueness of vision.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Isn't quite a home run: The visually flat film leans on a pop culture crutch that probably won't age very well, and the finale – while terrifically funny – feels piped in from another, far sillier movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There are just too many damn characters, with the best ones taking a backseat to the dullish love quadrangle.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There are significant stretches of talky tedium, more than a few “huh” moments for neophytes – especially whenever anyone starts nattering on about Dust with a capital D – and the ending plays abruptly, but there’s plenty here to hang a franchise on.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This kind of a dance film lives and dies by the routines, and this one wins: Mixing elements of gymnastics, karate, and break with the almighty step – an exceedingly polite term for what is really an awesome stomp.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    When the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River began construction in the early Nineties, an estimated 2 million people's lives were impacted. That's a staggering number to contemplate, but Up the Yangtze effectively personalizes that near-meaningless number by putting a face on at least a few of those 2 million.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It closes the film in what I suspect was intended as something of a happy ending, but it’s unnecessary: Thirty happy years should be happy ending enough.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s always a pleasure to be in the company of Potter, and when looking back at the just-competent first outings – well, baby, you’ve come a long way – but still: Where’s the magic, huh?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A Girl Cut in Two is Hitchcock sans the whodunit, essentially a long preamble of seduction and spiritual ruin, capped by a crime everyone saw coming (and an eye-dazzling coda that twists the title from metaphor to … something else).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It neither embarrasses the original, nor is superior to it in any way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This first release from Disney’s self-explanatory new arm, Disneynature, is at the very least peripherally concerned with the planet and its dwindling prospects, but the real renewable resource here is the groundbreaking "Planet Earth" miniseries.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Funny People – sensitive, shaggy, a little bit draggy – is as much about the maturation of Ira as a performer and George as a man as it is about Apatow’s maturation as an artist.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As for that central question: Yep, it’s art, all right. One only wishes they’d gotten down to the business of it sooner.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a little bit silly – as is Dafoe’s Kentucky-fried cowboy mechanic named Elvis – but silly is fun. In fact, one wishes it were sillier still.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Giamatti is masterful.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not an altogether convincing portrait, but it is an entertaining, even moving one, and the forcefulness of Bullock's presence goes a long way in pulling the film back from the brink of cuddliness.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The twentysomething talents behind Mystery Team are still in the comedy minors, but this nerdy, nutty, perfectly pitched first swing suggests there are major things to come.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There is Clooney’s deceptively layered performance, some startling bits of laugh-out-loud absurdity, and the not-at-all-negligible pleasure to be had in a cockeyed point of view.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an enjoyable enough exercise in teen angst triumphing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    These women are marvelous, with ancient, creased faces and the kind of admirable f...-all attitude that comes with age. I couldn't take my eyes off them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is Gary Winick atoning for his sins? If “Bride Wars” was an acid spill -- and that’s putting it generously -- then Letters to Juliet is like the safety shower in your high school chemistry class, delivering an unsubtle blast of sanitized sentimentality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Far more engrossing are the long, dialogue-free stretches that fix on, say, bobbing feet or curled fists on a speed bag. The soundscape, too, is endlessly fascinating, a layer cake of squeaks, grunts, gasps, and rattling chains that, combined, catches a rhythm that sounds an awful lot like song.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Those moments, as affecting as they are, can't surmount the overworkshopped feel of the whole film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Has very little soul to speak of, but it's got swagger to burn.

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