For 650 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 Someone Like You...
Score distribution:
650 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The easy, fast-talking rapport between the four young women is The Sisterhood’s biggest selling point. Too bad, then, that the premise demands they spend most of the film away from each other.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    July sees the world in a most unexpected way, and it's a shame that Me and You's preciousness sometimes overwhelms that uniqueness of vision.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Isn't quite a home run: The visually flat film leans on a pop culture crutch that probably won't age very well, and the finale – while terrifically funny – feels piped in from another, far sillier movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There are just too many damn characters, with the best ones taking a backseat to the dullish love quadrangle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Manages the neat feat of feeling sweetly inevitable rather than boilerplate predictable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Cornish, in her first film seen stateside, is astonishing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There are significant stretches of talky tedium, more than a few “huh” moments for neophytes – especially whenever anyone starts nattering on about Dust with a capital D – and the ending plays abruptly, but there’s plenty here to hang a franchise on.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This kind of a dance film lives and dies by the routines, and this one wins: Mixing elements of gymnastics, karate, and break with the almighty step – an exceedingly polite term for what is really an awesome stomp.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The balloon will resurface throughout, but far more interesting, and substantial, is the slow reveal of Simon's domestic situation.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You can’t read one of Clooney’s endless People profiles without hearing the Cary Grant comparison, but here, he’s all Gable – same rakishness and stubble and tanned-leather basso profundo.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    When the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River began construction in the early Nineties, an estimated 2 million people's lives were impacted. That's a staggering number to contemplate, but Up the Yangtze effectively personalizes that near-meaningless number by putting a face on at least a few of those 2 million.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It closes the film in what I suspect was intended as something of a happy ending, but it’s unnecessary: Thirty happy years should be happy ending enough.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    But by the time this imperfect little film wends its way to one of the most winning exit lines I've heard in a long time, it's turned into something, well, perfectly lovely.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Filmmakers nicely mix the historical and the tributary, honoring both Bennett's cultural landmark and the dancers who dream of joining its ranks.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This first release from Disney’s self-explanatory new arm, Disneynature, is at the very least peripherally concerned with the planet and its dwindling prospects, but the real renewable resource here is the groundbreaking "Planet Earth" miniseries.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Bandslam belongs to Connell. He has the unruly 'fro and endearing shamblingness of a young Daniel Stern, and he ably brings to life that rarest of cinematic qualities: decency.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The twentysomething talents behind Mystery Team are still in the comedy minors, but this nerdy, nutty, perfectly pitched first swing suggests there are major things to come.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they're terrific. But in this overpacked ensemble cast, it's Binoche you want to see more of.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    These women are marvelous, with ancient, creased faces and the kind of admirable f...-all attitude that comes with age. I couldn't take my eyes off them.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Everybody likes to watch the messy guts-stuff of other peoples' lives, if only because we know then we're not alone in our weird ways.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An absorbing human drama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With all its emphasis on beat, Brown Sugar can't maintain a steady one, yet when it finds it, the film surely soars.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's the tortoise and the hare, Nepalese-style, and it's surprisingly dramatic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and friendly and all-inclusive and unremarkable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Authenticity is strangely lacking in Laurel Canyon, although Cholodenko’s exquisite eye for framing remains uncorrupted. Laurel Canyon is often visually captivating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Square peg, round hole. That's what the twentysomethings who drift through Margarita Happy Hour are like.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A nice-looking, nice-feeling exercise in conventionalism that sure could use a couple of transvestites and maybe a house falling from the sky.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somewhere in that chirpy half-pint frame dwell some meaty comic chops. Goldie Hawn may have found her successor.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Jet Lag's romantic fluffery is somewhat beneath these old pros, but they make its meet-cute scenario work, mostly -– and most especially when crusty, grumpy, grizzled Jean Reno announces he's "totally in love."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect that, like the Coen brothers, David Lynch, and Wes Anderson -– our American masters of idiosyncrasy -– Kaurismäki has a limited appeal. Those who get him, really get him.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The senseless violence of a Jean-Claude Van Dammer, no point to that, but this, this has purpose. This is an ass-kicking a girl can get into. So why do I feel like crying mea culpa?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Movingly captures the terrors and delights of being lovesick at 17. Would that it hadn't felt constrained to target only the 17-year-olds.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Throughout, the documentary is fun and engaging, even whimsical when using (to good effect) illustrations and Gilliam’s own storyboards.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Falling in love with the wrong person makes for a far more toothsome melodrama, a fact this small, satisfying picture rightly recognizes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all boils down to trying too hard, when everybody knows a good grift is one that appears effortless.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Franklin injects life into a flat format and has in the process done something nearly unheard of in Hollywood as of late: He's brought class back to the genre film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a goofy, tongue-in-cheek, my-gawd-how-could-we-be-so-dumb shrine, but a shrine nonetheless.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The latest installment in the Austin Powers series has stopped making much sense at all, but it sure gets its giggle on, and good.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s best to situate yourself in the middle of the row; a seat at the end will most likely leave you feeling cross-eyed for an hour.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As an experiment in mood, as a love song to Paris and to the French New Wave, as a fun, flirty little number, Charlie provides a giddy satisfaction.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Taking a cue from the horse in question, Ross’ film takes its time getting into the race, but once it gets going, the going gets good.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Murphy's screentime takes a back seat to Douglas', of course, but from that back seat she makes a very big noise.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Medem's film is a bleached-out beauty, hitting our most commanding human emotions -- lust to love to grief to rage and back again -- while only occasionally striking a wrong chord.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The darker stuff begs to be handled less delicately than this dance, and in that respect the director stumbles.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not foreign, but not in the sense of national demarcations of language and custom. It speaks a different cinematic language, one that tosses off the usual rules of camerawork and narrative structure.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Ao relentlessly, gleefully dumb -- without being the slightest bit sardonic -- that you just can't help but guffaw … or groan … but probably both.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film stumbles a bit in its third act, when war kills the good times for good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Saved! initially gets in some good gags at the expense of religious hypocrisy, it eases off, opting not to skewer religion but rather to poke it gently with a stick to see what happens.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a dirty, ugly, joyless world these fathers and sons live in, and for all the passion involved, of retribution and a father's fierce love, Perdition is as emotionally distant as Sullivan. The feelings are all there, just submerged.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Did I fall in love with Undertow? Not in the least. But I liked it alright, and amidst the mediocrity, even rot, that constitutes 98% of contemporary American movies, that'll do fine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Dreamers is infused with the same kind of wistful melancholy that made the French New Wave films so winning, and it’s all gorgeous to look at.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, either you get it or you don't. Film critics and senators with election prospects don't. Kids in the mood to laugh at stupid shit for 87 minutes do. I'll toss my hat in the latter ring with glee.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    [Keaton's] lost none of the spunk, sass, and ditzbomb charm of her "Annie Hall" days. She, quite simply, is marvelous. Too bad her similarly iconic co-star is such a toad. Jack never stops being Jack, to great distraction.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Three actors play Bobby at different ages, and none of them quite jibe with the other – 16-year-old Bobby seems far savvier than the twenty-something version (who is played by a defanged Colin Farrell).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script also takes the occasional dip into hokeyness, but even that is buoyed by its ballsy leading ladies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film also inspires, if unconsciously, the viewer to rethink what exactly constitutes art.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As obvious as they get, and it wears its message on its bloodied jersey.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An admirable effort, but too many words, words, and more words, and not enough of the ache of that half-smile.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A pretty spot-on distillation of human weakness, but my god, must they all be so inhumane in the process?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Penn's Bicke is often so pitiable it's hard not to want to look away – but what else to expect from perhaps our most compulsively watchable contemporary actor?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To do no disservice to the impressive work of Bridges' co-stars, anytime his ragged writer, in flowing caftans and floppy hats, is on screen, it's impossible to take in anything else, so commanding is his presence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Affectionate but uninsightful biopic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Columbus never quite captures the depth, the rich complexities of Rowling's novels. She's written four Harry Potter books for kids that adults swoon for, too. Columbus has made two Harry Potter movies for kids … and we'll leave it at that. That isn't bad. But I suspect there's something better just around the bend.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Kinsey is too tasteful by half, and while it may have its gentle charms, it never thrills.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Understandably, a filmmaker tackling the retelling of a national hero must do so with great delicacy, but The Sea Inside presents not so much a hero as a saint in Sampredo.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What we get is more of the same from Ferrell – funny faces, goofy accents, pratfalls aplenty – and that ain't bad. It just could have been a lot better.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All herky-jerky camera movements and no pussyfooting around with the interior lives of these characters.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Makes for a playfully enthralling hour and a half.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A Girl Cut in Two is Hitchcock sans the whodunit, essentially a long preamble of seduction and spiritual ruin, capped by a crime everyone saw coming (and an eye-dazzling coda that twists the title from metaphor to … something else).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Just as marriage does not banish aloneness, proximity to the characters onscreen doesn't unlock any special connection to them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is Gary Winick atoning for his sins? If “Bride Wars” was an acid spill -- and that’s putting it generously -- then Letters to Juliet is like the safety shower in your high school chemistry class, delivering an unsubtle blast of sanitized sentimentality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Tonally, it all makes sense, but there’s such a thing as overmuchness. Gibney laudably launches a withering attack here on the pay-to-play relationship between lobbyists and lawmakers. But this viewer felt withered, too, by the end of his battering ram of a movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The subdued characters I can abide, intellectually speaking, but subdued filmmaking with material this fundamentally gut-punching is a lot less easy to swallow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Megamind gets existential, but only in blips, and while it is never anything less than vibrant and exceedingly clever, it is also a rather slight thing for such mega-sized proportions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Those moments, as affecting as they are, can't surmount the overworkshopped feel of the whole film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Hedlund's got a hell of a voice, rotgut-ragged, and whether he's crooning or wooing, whatever he's selling, and no matter how cornpone, I'm buying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You didn't actually think Stephin Merritt was going to cozy up to the camera and reveal his deepest-darkest, did you?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Far more engrossing are the long, dialogue-free stretches that fix on, say, bobbing feet or curled fists on a speed bag. The soundscape, too, is endlessly fascinating, a layer cake of squeaks, grunts, gasps, and rattling chains that, combined, catches a rhythm that sounds an awful lot like song.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The middle of a movie is often where filmmakers lose their way, but Friends With Benefits nails this stretch, in which nothing very remarkable happens as two people talk, in bed and out of bed. There's a fine line between fun-dirty and ick-dirty – sometimes you can't identify the line until it's been crossed – and this film keeps its toes on the right side of raunch.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's all vastly superior to Brett Ratner's scorched-earth "X-Men: The Last Stand," of course.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Has very little soul to speak of, but it's got swagger to burn.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Descendants is beautifully shot (by Phedon Papamichael) and compellingly performed, especially by its young stars, and it has moments of startling tenderness. If only it didn't feel phony to its bones.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The U.S. cut, which Wong endorses, runs a slim 108 minutes, and has by all accounts been reshaped for American audiences, who, by and large, don’t have the same foreknowledge of Ip Man, or martial arts, as Asian audiences do.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Big Miracle is all formula, but with just enough savvy to temper the gentle-spiritedness and qualify it as that rare family film with an emotional manipulativeness that doesn't leave a sick slick in the mouth.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The space prison set-pieces get the job done; only in the film's terrestrial bookends does this nuts-and-bolts action film show its rust.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Sturgess, saddled with a caddish character, is less compelling, but he does provide the film's only spot of unloosed, raw emotion. Everything else feels too precisely and too compactly assembled for much impact.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What's in a name? Lately, less and less. With Daniel Craig's third go at 007, I'm not sure there's much left that distinguishes Bond from Bourne from Batman. They're all slurping from the same soup – think: death-haunted, self-righteous, tight-lipped and -quipped, parkour enthusiast.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    White couldn't stay away, and neither can the band's legions of fans, who bop up and down in sold-out arenas at the reunion tour that provides the film's hopeful coda.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    (It should also be noted that Page One wears its pro-Times bias on its sleeve, right up to the rankling but now-common inclusion of a "get involved" Web address at film's end.)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There's no question that the actors and filmmakers have fashioned a compelling (if unformed) love story of a certain age – which is not to be confused for a love story for the ages.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Snyder has cast Man of Steel with dramatic actors, not action stars, and it pays off.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect it's that spirit as much as the injustice of her incarceration that drew so many people to her cause and inspired this labor-of-love documentary about her journey to hell and back.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After the recent rash of superhero end-spectacles as long-winded and self-serious as a term paper, the limited ambition of The Dark World’s climax is a relief. It scuttles all term paper aspirations and instead humbly lobs a thesis statement-slash-open invitation: Let’s have some fun, shall we? And so we did.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script is chockablock with al dente amusements – obvious targets still make for wickedly funny one-liners – and the German actor Waltz (Inglourious Basterds) is terrific as the only parent unburdened by decorum.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Does Apatow understand his heroes are assholes?
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As a portrait of what happens to a family when its glue disappears, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close wrung a bucket of tears out of me.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hunger Games franchise, both in print and onscreen, has been exceptionally clever about cozying away imaginative space for fans to fill in the blanks and cast themselves in the rich drama. That this latest film leaves us hungering for more only means that it’s working.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Way never arrives anywhere you couldn't see coming a mile away, but it does so with such empathy that its conclusions feel comforting rather than overly predictable.