Kimberley Jones
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For 688 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 Someone Like You...
Score distribution:
688 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Although Super Size Me benefits from a number of interviews with nutritionists, lobbyists, lawyers, and the like, the film inevitably (but not unenjoyably) is dominated by Spurlock, who offers his sober-minded statistics and cheeky asides without ever devolving into an off-putting Michael Moore-like moralizing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    You don't just root for Harold and Kumar to get the girl, get the weed, and, above all, get the burger – you want to hang out with them while they' doing it, and see if they'e free next Friday night, too.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Like a kindler, gentler "Bully," Mean Creek hinges on the bullied fighting back against the aggressor, but offers a more expansive examination of aggression and, even more significantly, passivity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Terribly tender, good-hearted picture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny, bewildering, giddy spectacle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Carrey is a bit of a conundrum: He's the best and worst thing about Lemony Snicket.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    But for all the film's griminess and doom, bad behavior and bad luck, it's hope that engines Head-On.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Forget life lessons: I much prefer a lemur king doing the robot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Happy Endings is unabashedly sentimental (cheekily couched in a black-comic guise), with Roos acting as a sort of benevolent god over his characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's the kind of movie that lives and dies by a viewer's own idiosyncrasies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Serenity evinces the kind of swashbuckling bonhomie that made so many of us fall in love with the original "Star Wars" films, a love that was mightily tested by George Lucas' humorless prequels.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The fault does not lie with Hoffman (who doesn't so much act out Capote's distinctive mannerisms and high-pitched lisp as channel them); his performance is undeniably great. Everything else – solid, satisfying though it may be – falls short of that greatness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    One wishes perhaps for a more thumping conclusion, but what we have instead is something perfectly in the spirit of the piece, reaffirming that life, big and little, happens in 10 minutes chunks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Quite astonishingly, amidst all the chaos – and there's no better word for Tristram Shandy's inspired, breakneck madness – what emerges is a featherlight, moving meditation on new fatherhood.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The only weak link here is Aniston's character – her Olivia, stuck in a holding pattern, feels like a holdover from Holofcener's previous, single-girl pictures, and Aniston underplays the role to the point of expressionlessness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    For a film about looking for a sign, looking for solace, Room quite brazenly offers neither. It isn't an easy film, but the world's already got plenty of easy and easily digestible films.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There’s an undeniable thrill to watching something so experimental and yet totally accessible to those of us who speak only layman’s Dylanese, and it’s Haynes’ warmest film yet.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As with "Sunshine," I'd call Juno a family film if only it didn't make teen pregnancy look so sporting. Instead, we'll settle for that rare bird, an indie comedy that uplifts – funny and smart, totally trying to be cool and succeeding, and heartfelt to boot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Pray maintains a steadfastly objective viewpoint, and it's a testament to his film's success that it can accommodate the audience's inevitably shifting allegiances from one family member to the next.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Post-viewing, I was still coasting on the giddy high of kinetic cinema, only to have the astonishing callousness of its conclusion slowly settle in. It's a better film for it – one only wishes that Reprise on a whole had been of the same mind: a little less cool, a little more cruel. That's where the really good stuff is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is at once elegant and sublimely silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film, a distinctly secular take on Waugh's religiosity, is far more interested in the battle of blind faith vs. rigid unbelief and its devastating effects. Herein, everyone is complicated – by their station, their philosophy, their God – and everyone is complicit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a rattling, heartrending performance (Moore) in, yes, a long, hard slough of a film – one that is well worth the journey, if not a repeat trip.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The upshot to a ticking bomb is that it only explodes the once, but Rachel's sister, Kym (Hathaway), goes off again and again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The deeply heartfelt Milk is more of a surface skim: a fairly standard biopic – if a very fine one, indeed – but never the transcendent work one would have hoped from the filmmaker or his subject.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and fierce and deeply moving.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Because Wendy and Lucy is so lean on plot and dialogue, there are long spaces to contemplate Wendy and her situation, and the logistics are mind-boggling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The Hangover instantly has the feel of one for the ages.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A funny, seductive, and surprisingly honest dramatization of the ways we snooker ourselves into incompatible love.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The sights are ingenious, impressively rendered in 3-D, and the sounds – including cheeky voice work by Mr. T, Neil Patrick Harris, and Benjamin Bratt – are a blast.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Cotillard doesn't look part Native American or sound like a Thirties Chicago moll, but damned if she isn't a sight and sound to behold. Whatever her technical limitations, she rises above them to breathe a flesh, blood, and battered verisimilitude into the part. You can't tear your eyes off her, any more than you can Mann's flawed but still engrossing picture.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Why wait for 2012? If you're hankering for a taste of the apocalypse, the opening sequence of this eye-opening, stomach-queasing doc has plenty to go on – witness menacing superimpositions on a bleak, blighted landscape – and the hits just keep on coming.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    They don't make women, sexy but regal, like Pfeiffer much anymore, and Cheri is quite a monument to her.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The middle is terrific, especially in a lengthy, unassuming scene in which the three leads sit, sip drinks, and have a good chat: It marks one of the great celluloid pleasures of the year, so virtuosically written, performed, and filmed is it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A staggering document of the lengths parents will go to for the sake of their child.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refn’s artful and energetic film never goes further than face value.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Hair is personal. It's also political.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Linklater has crafted an always genial and at times even joyful period charmer about that moment on the cusp: before a boy becomes a man and another man becomes a mythological figure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    All told, The Young Victoria is a very well-made if not especially memorable picture, moving with all the grace and steadfastness of a waltz Victoria and Albert share, but absent any urgency or anything particularly exclamatory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    While The Art of the Steal makes a very convincing – even bone-chilling – argument that the people and foundations that essentially hijacked the Barnes Foundation are primarily concerned with tourist dollars and not the preservation of Barnes' legacy, the film fails to even ponder why easier access to some of the world's greatest art treasures might not be an entirely bad thing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There is, quite simply, a rather refreshing ordinariness to Remember Me in the unflashy, knuckle-down attention it gives to character development and the building of plausible and involving family and friend dynamics.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Going dramatic, Stiller commits to the role completely; there's something rather admirable in his refusal to pander or soft-pedal the self-serious, frankly unlikable Greenberg.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Living in Emergency, then, is like a hard slap to the face: There is nothing remotely romantic about this grim depiction of two missions in Liberia and Congo in the mid-2000s.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An entirely sympathetic portrait of the artist at an advancing age. That's right, artist – and to a generation that knows Rivers only as a screeching red-carpet provocateur or as an overknifed monstrosity, that revelation alone is worth the cost of admission.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Nolan’s end-act pacing has always felt ponderous – but it’s not enough to ruin what is surely the most intellectually and viscerally engaging action film in years. The soul doesn’t stir, no, but everything else is wildly somersaulting.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refreshingly anti-princess and sweet without degrading into sugary, Ramona and Beezus animates Ramona's frequent flights of fancy with DIY-like sequences that literalize, quite charmingly, how a kid colors the world.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are good guys we don't care much about and bad guys that we do and even badder guys we're supposed to hate. But on the sliding scale of culpability, everybody's just a few clicks away from the next guy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A surprisingly warmhearted examination of hypocrisy and social insecurity, unlikely camaraderie and stutter-stepped formation of adult identity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    LaBeouf plays Jacob as no naif – he can be as slippery and savage as the next suit – but there's also real tenderness in his scenes with Mulligan and Langella (in a small but significant role as Jacob's mentor).
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The scoped camerawork is a shrewd tactic; only occasionally does its flat, proscenium effect make the action feel overly staged.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Boden and Fleck's unabashedly warmhearted film is a sensitively wrought but also very funny portrait of the way we respond to pressure.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly this is a tense, portentous, and provocative piece.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This is provocative stuff, to be sure, in which the stakes are so high that a pratfall concludes with exploding limbs and the anguished effect of its final minutes is a quiet shock to the system. A comedy of errors and terrors? Who woulda thunk it?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    So potent it nearly succeeds even as a vacuum sits squarely at its center.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This revisionist Western – intellectually, aesthetically, and narratively absorbing – rattles to the bone, but never quite rends the heart.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Quite simply, Midnight in Paris is charming – très charmant, to ape the argot of the locals. I say that somewhat tongue-in-cheek, as this is very much an outsider's valentine to the City of Lights.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    So much here is equally befuddling and beguiling; I caught myself leaning in toward the screen repeatedly, trying to somehow get closer to the gorgeous impenetrability of the story, of the boy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Part 2 is something else altogether. Such digital effects as the marauding giants that squash baby wizards like bugs or the inky terror that is the Death Eaters – acolytes to the mad, bad wizard Voldemort (Fiennes) – are magnificent and experienced in one long, clutched breath. But what's missing is what has been the chief pleasure of the series: the chemistry between its young leads.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Winnie the Pooh doesn't reinvent the wheel, just gives it an affectionate spin, and that is no more and no less than what one would hope from a family reunion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Undeniably gripping stuff.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    In its third act, Life, Above All takes a bit of a dip into la-la land, in terms of believability – how precisely is an impoverished family supposed to have afforded an ambulance and hospice care? – but that doesn't diminish the emotional impact of Manyaka's performance and the idea that courage can be infectious, too.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What is so surprising – even exhilarating – about The Names of Love is that it shucks off the desultory roadblocks that engine the modern romantic comedy – all that razzmatazz of missed connections and dunderheaded misunderstandings.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they nail the humor, all right, but they also, quite crucially, humanize the high concept.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a period piece about the origins of psychoanalysis and the sexual confusions of its progenitors that is eloquent and handsomely made, if never quite revelatory.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Stoller and Segel don't shy away from rational, relatable adults, which may be an unsexy selling point for a romantic comedy, but that attention to authenticity elevates the likable, low-stakes The Five-Year Engagement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sisley is a former stand-up comic, although you'd never guess it here: Finding himself in the eye of a colossal shit storm of his own making, his Vincent is brusque and action oriented, his face, a picture of ulceration in progress.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Ambitious, brutish, ruthlessly unromantic – has the right idea casting its heroine as a Joan of Arc-type crusader and its evil queen a dissertation (albeit first draft) on beauty as the most direct path to power for the disenfranchised female.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    And yet, it works, so much so that after two and a quarter hours, I was startled – and not a little disappointed – when the closing credits kicked in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This documentary does boast some bowl-you-over reveals best experienced blind.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What a weird, winning little movie is Robot & Frank, which explores what happens to the essential self as the memory goes. Oh, and it's a heist picture. With robot butlers. I'm not sure I've ever seen anything quite like it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With a saga this sprawling and byzantine, it makes sense that the emphasis is not on Schiele, but rather on what the sorely wronged Bondi never stopped calling "my Schiele."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film is studded with stirring moments of surprise.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Keep the Lights On feels like a first-rate, late-Seventies experimental student film, or early Scorsese. But then the cycle of addiction takes over the film, and the plot about stagnancy ends up stagnating the film itself.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Cooper mostly tamps down that Sexiest Man Alive demeanor that follows him from film to film, and Lawrence – a continually startling young talent – counterpoises her Bardot beauty with a blistering snarl. They both play hurt people clawing their way toward wellness, but it's Lawrence who makes you feel the hurt in your heart – and the hope that it'll get better soon.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    When Les Misérables is good, it is very, very good, and when it is bad, it's usually because Russell Crowe has opened his mouth.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    First, to dispel the two talking points attending The Impossible, Juan Antonio Bayona's dramatization of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: No, it's not racist, and no, you don't have to be a parent to feel the film in your bones.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With "50/50," his last stint in the director's chair, Levine upended convention to make a feel-good cancer movie. He's still defying expectations: In animating the inner workings of the undead, he's made a movie that is both clever and heartfelt.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A spirited and eye-popping stealth charmer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Berger’s low-key, likable ensemble film flares with brilliance in its framing concept.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Blancanieves never lags, per se, it’s just awfully in love with itself: with its gorgeous black and white chiaroscuros and whirling-dervish first-person camera perspectives, the Spanish-guitar-scored dance sequences (that include the undeniable dance of the matador in action), and battering winds of emotional extremes. By the end of this sumptuous and sincerely felt melodrama, I was rather in love with it, too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and fanboys’ favorite whipping boy, Damon Lindelof, keep the film moving at a quippy clip; there’s really no fat here until the film feints a climax only to lurch the coaster-car back up the hill again.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sweetgrass’ unbroken shots of often-repetitive activity have a beguiling quality to them, their very monotony encouraging a deeper absorption and reflection, but hard facts aren’t easy to come by.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It gives the illusion of a conclusion and cuts to black before it has to answer for how many more questions have been raised.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Maybe someday there will be a better commercial comedy about a girl taking charge of her sexual education, but for now, this is the only one we’ve got, and it’s a filthy-fun charmer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An outstanding cast have crafted a delicate, eloquent picture of believable humans in so many gradations of hurt, but it stops just shy of catharsis.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An ambitious comedy with not-negligible dramatic depth, but Bell, a first-time feature writer and director, is frankly too generous with her large cast.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The World’s End affectionately takes a page from our Fifties sci-fi films.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Much has been made of the fact that Swanberg has cast for the first time bona fide movie stars and not just his mumblecore pals: In fact, it's the making of the movie. If you're going to build an entire film on microexpressions, then a certain innate magnetism is required. Swanberg gets it in spades from his top-shelf cast.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    High spirits mark the first half of the film; quite simply, these guys are just fun to be around – most especially Howard, all half-lidded, cat-who-got-the-cream coolness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s the funniest, friskiest date movie in a good long while.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The spirit of the thing – the way it champions intellectual curiosity and critical thinking – warmed this nerd’s heart tremendously.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard truths to be found in Finding Vivian Maier (really, how could there be?), but it’s an engrossing doc nevertheless – a portrait of an American artist hiding in plain sight, a mystery with too few clues, and a sincere inquiry into how best to divine the wishes of the dead.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers have cast their underdogs well: Madhur Mittal plays the anxious, upright Dinesh; Suraj Sharma is the loose-limbed, pizza-loving Rinku; and they’re both funny and endearing, two words that apply to the whole of the supporting cast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Elgort’s performance is more mannered than Woodley’s open-faced, direct line to the heart, but it works.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed, I cried, I longed for a pet dragon to call my own.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sweet-spirited and sometimes meandering but always working in the service of its young protagonists’ perspective, We Are the Best! might come off as slight if you aren’t paying attention, or you pay too much attention to the too-cute closing credits montage.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Forget divining who’s predator and who’s prey. Everybody’s chum here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Guardians of the Galaxy is an outlier: a space opera in a largely earthbound movie cycle (excepting the occasional red-eye to another dimension in the Thor pictures), candy-colored and bopping where the other Marvel movies are muted and imposing, and the funniest one to date, without a doubt.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film provides invaluable context in its detailing of institutional racism in the Sixties and Seventies and in its emphasis on Ellis as an advocate for equality and as a righteous shit-stirrer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As much a portrait of a community as of its brilliant, de facto mayor, Harmontown is a stirring tribute to the restorative power of finding your people.

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