Kimberley Jones
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For 691 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Force Majeure
Lowest review score: 0 View from the Top
Score distribution:
691 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In the end, we know Andie and Ben will kiss and make up -– how could too alliteratively aligned pretty people not? -– but first we must wade through the protracted and wholly unwarranted period in which both huffs about the other’s deceptions.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable but good-natured all the same.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is long on atmosphere, but short on smarts: Plot points are easily unraveled 20 minutes in advance (no fun sleuthing for the audience here), the ending is an unsatisfying pastiche off too many horror tropes, and it would take a week to plug all of Gothika’s gaps in logic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's just no reconciling the film's ambivalent message. Newell hangs a modern sensibility on a supposed period piece, and hangs his film in the process.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When The Company owns up to what it is -– a performance piece -– it’s glorious. Everything else -– the window-dressing of a fiction film -– just gums up that gloriousness.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Their travelogue-ready romance is utterly doofy but not disagreeable, and this sort of wish-fulfillment fantasy will strike the right chord with Moore’s fan base of preteen girls.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The bland script and direction are spruced up by a likable cast.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In manipulating its many disparate characters to bump into each other and set plot lines in motion, Intermission walks a fine line between clever and contrived, with the scale tipping more often toward contrived.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The trouble with retooling fairy tales to jibe with our more enlightened times is that too often the fun gets stripped along with the offensive parts.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Although the transvestites’ plight – mishandled, misunderstood, and/or misappropriated – is meant to supply Connie and Carla's emotional core, one never gets the feeling of anything stronger than an at-shoulder-length's sympathy from this film.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Knoxville, in his first dramatic role, does what he can with script and direction that aggressively eschew any insight into Kaufman's grief.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In terms of a pre-teen instructional, Sleepover offers throughout a laudable emphasis on the importance of friendship, but parents may rightfully flinch at a protagonist who is ultimately rewarded for breaking all the rules.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps the more appropriate question to put to this remake would be "What the hell’s the point?"
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Grace and Johannson's courtship has all the heat of a wet wipe and, worse yet, leaves Quaid offscreen for long stretches.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Either you like your movies to be, well, movie-like: imitations of life, with musical accompaniment and artificial lighting and tracking shots and looped dialogue; or you like them to be re-creations of life, sans the artifice. The King Is Alive clearly falls into the latter camp.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Leaves me wanting to watch Tomei and company in something more worthy of their abilities.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's all pretty goofy, which I assume is the point, but it's also pretty dull.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    I’m all for ambiguity, but Dear Frankie’s multiple dangling threads indicate incoherent storytelling, not profundity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This isn’t Nicole Kidman’s first dalliance with witchcraft, and it is one of Bewitched’s unfortunate achievements that it actually makes one pine for Kidman’s 1998 dud, "Practical Magic." That witch at least had some sass; this cardigan-clad witch, alas, is an altogether more benign being, and by "benign" I mean boring.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Myla Goldberg's novel about spelling-bee fever, a family in chaos, and religious/mystic exploration arrives on the screen with all its faults intact, but few of its charms.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Much of the original film's geniality – and all of its pro-environment stumping – has gone missing; what we have instead is a watered-down likeness that curiously turns disaster flick in its too-scary third act.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As the songs pile up and the plot putters along, Romance & Cigarettes wears thin, like a moral for the titular addiction: Sure, there’s the sweet dream of that first drag, but a whole pack’ll do a body bad.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps there was some confusion – should we play this as a lark or a lesson in geopolitical unrest? – or maybe there was some studio involvement to defang the politics; whatever the case, the noncommittal Charlie Wilson's War treads a good-natured but yawning in-between.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Book of Secrets isn’t so much a romp as a long trudge through American history factoids and conspiracy-theory gobbledygook. Cool car chase, though.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This British rom-com is all soft and plodgy, a by-the-numbers redemption tale that careens uncomfortably from sentimentality to stomach-turning sight gags.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Alexander's script considers context anathema, leaving us to wonder, among other puzzlers, why these two jerks are friends to begin with – and, perhaps, on what bad breakup or neglected childhood one may blame the film's dispiriting misanthropy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kit Kittredge is a dutiful bore. Still, I couldn't help but wonder if, in the face of all-out market collapse, it might serve a dual purpose as primer for kiddies on economic depression – because food stamps always taste better with a side order of spunk. Or is it pluck?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a curiously inert, workmanlike production: a whole lot of pomp and incircumstance.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Mancini's character boils down to a lot of self-loathing and unresolved mommy issues – which is as tedious as it sounds.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Everything that was sharp in the original text has been rounded and buffed.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Once spoiled by the gossamer disquietude of Kim Jee-woon's original Tale, it's difficult to view this Americanized version in anything but the blandest light.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's some funny stuff here that doesn't involve degrading its female protagonists, and the cast, by and large, is appealing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A decent enough spot of silliness.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The only thrill here comes from the adrenaline kick of the chase. Alas, it's an empty, Pavlovian kick at best.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The misfits, as ever, must take a back seat to the morality, and the result – while in no way migraine-inducing – traffics in rote truisms.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The opening montage is a jazzy, grabby thing, artfully layering the kids’ auditions to mimic the frenzied pace of the day. But that freneticism never really goes away, nor does the staccato timing.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Most devastating to the film’s effectiveness is its inability to convey that one essential to the story of Amelia Earhart: the tangible pleasures of flying.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The first act is very nearly unbearable, leaden and doomy and generically plotted.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    They’re not all hideous, the men who sit for interviews with a graduate student (Nicholson) and unload their dirty laundry. Sometimes they’re just feckless, or crass; some are even pitiable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Short to short, it’s a Russian roulette.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The camera may dive deep, but the content skims mere surface.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Frankly, I don't like to be bullied, and bullying is exactly what Knight and Day – overly cute and overconvinced of its own cool – does best.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Sure, it's nifty enough to see dust particles swirling or hands swooshing at you, but mostly the 3-D muddles the invention and exquisiteness of the film's raison d'être: the dancing.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A lot of gunk: dance-offs, sing-alongs, awkward exes, and a dirty-talking White blasting through, I'm afraid, the last bits of her novelty. That again?
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's hard, as a viewer, not to shudder in tandem with Lisa – this isn't a love match, it's two would-be motivational coaches swapping slogans.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Bell steals every scene she's in, and her abrupt dismissal feels all the crueler for so much charisma wasted: She shoulda been a contender.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's nothing that feels like real rage, nothing that even remotely approximates the spiritual decimation of a termination.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This is no more (but no less?) than what we have rather oddly come to expect from Neeson in his late period (Taken, The A-Team).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Wimpy Kid's filmmakers have gone off-book, so to speak, to inflect Greg with a surprising cruel streak.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As an unsparing portrait of disaffection among the small-paycheck, faux-creative class, The Future is rather astute … which isn't to say it isn't also bang-your-head-on-the-wall annoying.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's nothing here for the viewer to do, no kinks to work out, no double-crossings to anticipate, not even a half-hearted flail at figuring out how Danny ticks.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The Big Year's biggest disappointment is its inadequacy in elucidating the passion of the birder. What ardency, and what an exceptional, impenetrable world they move in. I for one wanted a better look at it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Still, once you accept Paul W.S. Anderson's entirely unnecessary adaptation on its own terms (nonsensical, underachieving), it has its limited charms, which include a snigger-inducing alphabet soup of accents, a standout rooftop swordfight, and British comedian James Corden as the Musketeers' put-upon manservant.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    For a comedy, The Sitter is frightfully spare on full-bodied laughs.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Wouldn't it make more sense on basic cable? Plum screen incarnate (and film producer) Katherine Heigl got her start in TV, on Roswell and Grey's Anatomy, and her public persona – a combination of prickliness and adoration-seeking that has famously grated on viewers' and critics' nerves alike – has historically played better there.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps Sucsy was overwhelmed by his immersion in such colorful and outré material; he's chosen for his followup, the I Can't Believe It's Not Nicholas Sparks weepie The Vow, the cinematic equivalent of a lie-down.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    If A Thousand Words' formula seems familiar, that's because writer Steve Koren has tripped down this quasi-metaphysical path before in "Bruce Almighty" and "Click."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This is fussy filmmaking, overly made-up (the costume mandate seems to include the buzzwords "coffee filters," "croquembouche," and "Day-Glo paint") and bereft of wit.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    By film's end, you'll wish they tossed Allen in the rainforest and left him for the leopards to snack on.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Amusing but never rousing, this fourth installment in the Ice Age cartoon franchise comes fretted with freezer burn.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Liberal Arts is not unlikable: There are some intelligent observations about how humans woo, and the film is so suffused with sincerity you want to give it a pat on the head just for trying so hard.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kiddos: I'm sighing, too, but only from relief it's all behind us now.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Fine to look at, but good luck feeling anything.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s clear this director sees carnage as nothing more than an opportunity for music-video production values.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This film adaptation feels like YA, with cat’s-cradle love matches, soft-focus sexuality, and a main character who never satisfactorily makes the transition from page to screen.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann has always had a knack with the fever of passion, but here he only catches high fever’s empty gibberish.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Tiny and well-intentioned but dramatically inert and sham-kooky, Girl Most Likely is for Kristen Wiig completists only, and even they may squirm at spending a whole movie waiting for her character to pull her head out of her ass.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    For such a deft wit, Jane Austen sure has inspired some nitwitted entertainments. Actually, the Austen influence here is negligible.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a bold and certainly credible move, but the execution is something of a belly flop. Thanks for Sharing isn’t really about a disease, only the cure, and that bias makes it a plausible picture of the Friend of Bill community-based recovery, but kind of a sham as a portrait of actual human beings.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Thrillers don’t come much more nondescript than this: If Runner Runner were a color scheme, it would be beige, with an accent wall in taupe.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The richly hued CG animation is quite nice – a mix of hyperdetailed character work and painterly cityscapes and pastorals – and the script putters along with small but regular amusements.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The promising-sounding football movie would turn out to be a movie about men talking on phones.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A bright idea, disappointingly dulled in the execution.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Amusing enough, but weirdly joyless.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Patinkin and King’s characters’ wrangling with spirituality is sincere, and specific. Everything else in this everything-and-the-kitchen-sink film feels like too many ideas stored up over an especially long winter.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an impossible standard, maybe, but in 42 minutes, TV’s "Friday Night Lights" delivered all-star-level emotional complexity and action. When the Game Stands Tall is strictly JV squad.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Saving Christmas will hold little interest for anyone not already a believer. It’s too single-minded in its instructional purpose, too averse to multidimensional characters, too youth-pastor-like in its dorky humor.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Fails because it takes itself so seriously, and because it is itself so seriously dull. Soderbergh's straining to give us a wink -- come on, guys, this is fun -- but really it just feels like some awful eye twitch -- a spasm of yawning self-indulgence in a mostly captivating career.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    If LaBute wants to plumb the depths of human unkindness, have at it -– only dig deeper next time.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    It's a botched job through and through, made all the more distressing by Bullock's recent announcement that she's throwing in the romantic comedy towel for a while.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Bait equals bad.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Christina Applegate, of Eighties white-trash pinup fame, is a comic foil par excellence, delivering a snazzy, self-assured performance that lands the biggest laughs in a movie made mostly of hollow chuckles. She, in fact, is the sweetest thing in this sour, sucky film.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    The jokes just aren't there, which makes it very hard for the stars -- who are trying very, very hard -- to really make a dent.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    The fictionalization of their journey is simply not that engrossing, nor are their alter egos, with their tightly scripted character arcs.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Head Over Heels whitewashes the originality and, well, weirdness Waters showed in his first film, although it's impossibe to imagine anything starring young poster-pups Potter and Prinze Jr. could be particularly edgy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    "By practicing his art, he revealed himself to us." Fellini: I’m a Born Liar provides proof positive: The art indeed reveals far more than this pedestrian documentary ever does.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Very little here begs to be paid attention to.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Another casualty of the uncomfortable branding so common to the teen genre, the same branding one sees in a film starring Hilary Duff, or Amanda Bynes, or the next sweet but bland blond actress that comes down the assembly line.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    If Affleck stumbles, Smith's script does nothing to catch his fall. Surprisingly, Smith's truest talent – that of writing – is Jersey Girl's weakest link.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    There’s nothing especially offensive about the actress (Hudson); if anything, it’s that lack of offense, her overwhelmingly benign vibe, that has become increasingly repugnant with every picture she puts out.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Clearly the film is archly trying to connect the dots between Rove and the supreme mishandling of Iraq – and a compelling case might be made – but it isn't made here.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    The actors do a fine, if unsoulful, job, but the real problem with A Love Divided is its unwillingness to unromanticize its heroes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    A stiff drink or maybe some pharmaceutical assistance might have made me overlook the film's sour tone, or the unremarkableness of its direction.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    This one has the feel of being penned on rolling papers, with room to spare.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    What this really comes down to is the film's central lie. Made of Honor pins its hopes on a character who acts utterly without honor, and on an actor who has only two settings – sensitive or smarmy. The smarm wins.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    From "Hands on a Hard Body" to an 89-minute ogling of another hard body: It boggles the mind that 11 years after his engrossing documentary about an endurance competition to win a truck in Longview, Texas, filmmaker Bindler has channeled his talents into this regrettable comedy.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Ghosts indeed: This romantic comedy by name alone attempts to make funny – not to mention culturally relevant – the kind of swinging-dick misogyny that went out of fashion years ago.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    This is the kind of movie in which every other line of dialogue feels like a metaphor – and from there on, the film seesaws between the uncomfortable extremes of glum and twee: an overwrought dirge keyed to a xylophonic ping.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    I’m told Bella’s helplessness is true to the spirit of the novels, but so what? It’s almost 2010 – let’s get hip, people.

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