For 650 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 Yu-Gi-Oh!: The Movie
Score distribution:
650 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Tonally, it all makes sense, but there’s such a thing as overmuchness. Gibney laudably launches a withering attack here on the pay-to-play relationship between lobbyists and lawmakers. But this viewer felt withered, too, by the end of his battering ram of a movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Something that falls just shy of greatness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The film can feel a touch overscripted, but Polley and her actors effect true-to-life rhythms of speech.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and fierce and deeply moving.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The only weak link here is Aniston's character – her Olivia, stuck in a holding pattern, feels like a holdover from Holofcener's previous, single-girl pictures, and Aniston underplays the role to the point of expressionlessness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    (It should also be noted that Page One wears its pro-Times bias on its sleeve, right up to the rankling but now-common inclusion of a "get involved" Web address at film's end.)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they're terrific. But in this overpacked ensemble cast, it's Binoche you want to see more of.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This is provocative stuff, to be sure, in which the stakes are so high that a pratfall concludes with exploding limbs and the anguished effect of its final minutes is a quiet shock to the system. A comedy of errors and terrors? Who woulda thunk it?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Moon doesn't belabor anything, really, so confidently measured and philosophically nuanced it all plays out (aided by a striking, under-the-skin original score by Clint Mansell).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s best to situate yourself in the middle of the row; a seat at the end will most likely leave you feeling cross-eyed for an hour.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What a weird, winning little movie is Robot & Frank, which explores what happens to the essential self as the memory goes. Oh, and it's a heist picture. With robot butlers. I'm not sure I've ever seen anything quite like it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To do no disservice to the impressive work of Bridges' co-stars, anytime his ragged writer, in flowing caftans and floppy hats, is on screen, it's impossible to take in anything else, so commanding is his presence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    "By practicing his art, he revealed himself to us." Fellini: I’m a Born Liar provides proof positive: The art indeed reveals far more than this pedestrian documentary ever does.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Isn't Lee's most personal piece, but it may very well be his most mature.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear if Van Sant intends to inspire guilt; here, as elsewhere, he is exasperatingly abstruse. And in this striving to not say too much, he ends up not saying much of anything at all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Chbosky surrounds his hurting characters with the cinematic equivalent of a hug circle – which is sweet, but rather antithetical to tension-building.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Teenage is an art film – an engrossing one at that – so it isn’t required to respect Queensberry rules vis-à-vis documentaries.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As an unsparing portrait of disaffection among the small-paycheck, faux-creative class, The Future is rather astute … which isn't to say it isn't also bang-your-head-on-the-wall annoying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Girl Who Played With Fire's chief frustration is in how removed Salander and Blomkvist are from each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and sweet and guaranteed to flood you with good feeling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Grace and Johannson's courtship has all the heat of a wet wipe and, worse yet, leaves Quaid offscreen for long stretches.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A romantic comedy, too, but this time the romance is between two women, and one of them, truth be told, is a dud.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It has a basic goodness of heart that counteracts, if not entirely cancels out, the film's broadness and busyness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    [Keaton's] lost none of the spunk, sass, and ditzbomb charm of her "Annie Hall" days. She, quite simply, is marvelous. Too bad her similarly iconic co-star is such a toad. Jack never stops being Jack, to great distraction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's easy enough to forget there are special effects involved, so convincing is Stu's rippling fur and big beamy eyes filling up with tears.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear where the buck stops in terms of creative authority – at one point, Clayman complains that "the only thing I feel in control of is the money" – which renders OC87 at once a remarkable achievement, and a fatally compromised film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The sights are ingenious, impressively rendered in 3-D, and the sounds – including cheeky voice work by Mr. T, Neil Patrick Harris, and Benjamin Bratt – are a blast.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Much to cheer here, from its treasure trove of early and alternate versions of songs to the triumphant finale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Square peg, round hole. That's what the twentysomethings who drift through Margarita Happy Hour are like.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The final conflict is so protracted as to comfortably accommodate a bathroom break. Don't worry. You won't miss anything you haven't seen before.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A pretty spot-on distillation of human weakness, but my god, must they all be so inhumane in the process?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You didn't actually think Stephin Merritt was going to cozy up to the camera and reveal his deepest-darkest, did you?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The easy, fast-talking rapport between the four young women is The Sisterhood’s biggest selling point. Too bad, then, that the premise demands they spend most of the film away from each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Bandslam belongs to Connell. He has the unruly 'fro and endearing shamblingness of a young Daniel Stern, and he ably brings to life that rarest of cinematic qualities: decency.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, Pitch Perfect isn't all that good – but it's an awfully good sport.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    In a media landscape that only has eyes for the sex lives of nubile young things, Hope Springs' sincere, considered, and unembarrassed exploration of mature sexuality marks a welcome exception.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    In its third act, Life, Above All takes a bit of a dip into la-la land, in terms of believability – how precisely is an impoverished family supposed to have afforded an ambulance and hospice care? – but that doesn't diminish the emotional impact of Manyaka's performance and the idea that courage can be infectious, too.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The film's "never grow up" refrain plays like a broken record, until, in an abrupt (but not unexpected) turnaround at film's end, it fixes itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's all vastly superior to Brett Ratner's scorched-earth "X-Men: The Last Stand," of course.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not like Monsters University is a bad movie. It’s just not a terribly interesting one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Feels like a Fincher film: It possesses the same smarts, the same visual panache, the same violence. But not the same heart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Medem's film is a bleached-out beauty, hitting our most commanding human emotions -- lust to love to grief to rage and back again -- while only occasionally striking a wrong chord.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is a quest movie, with a lot of ground covered, and just as our heroes never stay long in one place or feel safe in their surroundings, neither does the audience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Way never arrives anywhere you couldn't see coming a mile away, but it does so with such empathy that its conclusions feel comforting rather than overly predictable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There isn’t a false step from the quietly devastating Farahani; her tour-de-force performance carries the film through its rocky stretches.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Bardem injects a shaggy, compassionate humor throughout, aided by a wry and moving ensemble cast and co-writer/director Fernando León de Aranda's eye for the offbeat.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    You don't just root for Harold and Kumar to get the girl, get the weed, and, above all, get the burger – you want to hang out with them while they' doing it, and see if they'e free next Friday night, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Warmed my heart about as much as the cold cream Angèle slathers all over her wrinkling clients.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In manipulating its many disparate characters to bump into each other and set plot lines in motion, Intermission walks a fine line between clever and contrived, with the scale tipping more often toward contrived.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film, a distinctly secular take on Waugh's religiosity, is far more interested in the battle of blind faith vs. rigid unbelief and its devastating effects. Herein, everyone is complicated – by their station, their philosophy, their God – and everyone is complicit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    All told, The Young Victoria is a very well-made if not especially memorable picture, moving with all the grace and steadfastness of a waltz Victoria and Albert share, but absent any urgency or anything particularly exclamatory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    For a film about looking for a sign, looking for solace, Room quite brazenly offers neither. It isn't an easy film, but the world's already got plenty of easy and easily digestible films.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It neither embarrasses the original, nor is superior to it in any way.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is at once elegant and sublimely silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    A stiff drink or maybe some pharmaceutical assistance might have made me overlook the film's sour tone, or the unremarkableness of its direction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film stumbles a bit in its third act, when war kills the good times for good.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Manages the neat feat of feeling sweetly inevitable rather than boilerplate predictable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A staggering document of the lengths parents will go to for the sake of their child.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie can be funny in fits, but too often the scripters go for the obvious and uninspired.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 11 Kimberley Jones
    It's all infuriatingly simplistic, and the performances help matters little. Quinn and McTeer are wholly uncompelling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Good, clean fun, with none of the icky aftertaste so common to “family friendly” ware, Drumline proves irresistible in more ways than one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Has very little soul to speak of, but it's got swagger to burn.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    I’m all for ambiguity, but Dear Frankie’s multiple dangling threads indicate incoherent storytelling, not profundity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This kind of a dance film lives and dies by the routines, and this one wins: Mixing elements of gymnastics, karate, and break with the almighty step – an exceedingly polite term for what is really an awesome stomp.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There's no denying the dazzling effect, but a fireworks sequence midfilm only underscores the sad fact that there's no lasting illumination here, only the fast-burn spitzing of bang snaps.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    They don't make women, sexy but regal, like Pfeiffer much anymore, and Cheri is quite a monument to her.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The middle of a movie is often where filmmakers lose their way, but Friends With Benefits nails this stretch, in which nothing very remarkable happens as two people talk, in bed and out of bed. There's a fine line between fun-dirty and ick-dirty – sometimes you can't identify the line until it's been crossed – and this film keeps its toes on the right side of raunch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Boden and Fleck's unabashedly warmhearted film is a sensitively wrought but also very funny portrait of the way we respond to pressure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    When Les Misérables is good, it is very, very good, and when it is bad, it's usually because Russell Crowe has opened his mouth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What we get is more of the same from Ferrell – funny faces, goofy accents, pratfalls aplenty – and that ain't bad. It just could have been a lot better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Bruckheimer -– always eager to egg on the public’s thirst for bigger, louder, stupider –- has done a scandalous amount of damage to contemporary cinema, but for once, his dubious talent for big-buck bombast is exploited for good rather than evil.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Penn's Bicke is often so pitiable it's hard not to want to look away – but what else to expect from perhaps our most compulsively watchable contemporary actor?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Columbus never quite captures the depth, the rich complexities of Rowling's novels. She's written four Harry Potter books for kids that adults swoon for, too. Columbus has made two Harry Potter movies for kids … and we'll leave it at that. That isn't bad. But I suspect there's something better just around the bend.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Did I fall in love with Undertow? Not in the least. But I liked it alright, and amidst the mediocrity, even rot, that constitutes 98% of contemporary American movies, that'll do fine.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Yes, this is the stuff of fiction, where individuals can drift in and out of another's life and make extraordinary, unbelievable things happen.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Falling in love with the wrong person makes for a far more toothsome melodrama, a fact this small, satisfying picture rightly recognizes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Echotone is scattered, for sure (the sound ordinance battle is poorly handled), but as an anecdotal account of Austin in the first decade of a new century, it's rarely anything less than compelling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kit Kittredge is a dutiful bore. Still, I couldn't help but wonder if, in the face of all-out market collapse, it might serve a dual purpose as primer for kiddies on economic depression – because food stamps always taste better with a side order of spunk. Or is it pluck?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Megamind gets existential, but only in blips, and while it is never anything less than vibrant and exceedingly clever, it is also a rather slight thing for such mega-sized proportions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an enjoyable enough exercise in teen angst triumphing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Everybody likes to watch the messy guts-stuff of other peoples' lives, if only because we know then we're not alone in our weird ways.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a curiously inert, workmanlike production: a whole lot of pomp and incircumstance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A manic, lithesome thing, 2 Days in New York flexes between broad comedy and a beautifully observed portrait of family life – especially life after death.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The latest installment in the Austin Powers series has stopped making much sense at all, but it sure gets its giggle on, and good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Marshmallow nation, you may now exhale: Rob Thomas did ya right.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Still, when The Yellow Handkerchief finally hooks into the meat of Hamill’s source story, the narrative tension puts enough wind in the film’s sails to arrive at its corny but sentimentally satisfying conclusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Perfectly passable film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A nice-looking, nice-feeling exercise in conventionalism that sure could use a couple of transvestites and maybe a house falling from the sky.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The characters in The Claim suffer under the weight of very big things -- betrayal, abandonment, disease, death -- but they do so quietly, stoically, until, by God, they just can't take it anymore.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Carrey is a bit of a conundrum: He's the best and worst thing about Lemony Snicket.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Saved! initially gets in some good gags at the expense of religious hypocrisy, it eases off, opting not to skewer religion but rather to poke it gently with a stick to see what happens.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Dreamers is infused with the same kind of wistful melancholy that made the French New Wave films so winning, and it’s all gorgeous to look at.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Stoller and Segel don't shy away from rational, relatable adults, which may be an unsexy selling point for a romantic comedy, but that attention to authenticity elevates the likable, low-stakes The Five-Year Engagement.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s the funniest, friskiest date movie in a good long while.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Help may be more interested in the moral at the end of the story than the story itself, but what saves the film from its meticulous one-dimensionality is that nuanced, deeply moving cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Counselors and campers' moms tend to tear up when they talk about the lessons these girls are learning, lessons that go way beyond how to tune a bass, but this isn't exactly a "rah-rah" film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What is so surprising – even exhilarating – about The Names of Love is that it shucks off the desultory roadblocks that engine the modern romantic comedy – all that razzmatazz of missed connections and dunderheaded misunderstandings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny, bewildering, giddy spectacle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Movingly captures the terrors and delights of being lovesick at 17. Would that it hadn't felt constrained to target only the 17-year-olds.