For 666 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 View from the Top
Score distribution:
666 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Filmmakers nicely mix the historical and the tributary, honoring both Bennett's cultural landmark and the dancers who dream of joining its ranks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    White couldn't stay away, and neither can the band's legions of fans, who bop up and down in sold-out arenas at the reunion tour that provides the film's hopeful coda.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An inner-city tragedy that plays its story simply, sorrowfully, and beautifully.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The elements are all here for something spectacular – and in brilliant bursts, Jeunet really gets it – but in the end, all that potential is sunk by a terminally confused tone and milquetoast pairing of lovers. Pity that.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Living in Emergency, then, is like a hard slap to the face: There is nothing remotely romantic about this grim depiction of two missions in Liberia and Congo in the mid-2000s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A funny, seductive, and surprisingly honest dramatization of the ways we snooker ourselves into incompatible love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    July sees the world in a most unexpected way, and it's a shame that Me and You's preciousness sometimes overwhelms that uniqueness of vision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed, I cried, I longed for a pet dragon to call my own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a period piece about the origins of psychoanalysis and the sexual confusions of its progenitors that is eloquent and handsomely made, if never quite revelatory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Going dramatic, Stiller commits to the role completely; there's something rather admirable in his refusal to pander or soft-pedal the self-serious, frankly unlikable Greenberg.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Mamet does a shrewdly skillful job with these Tinseltown terrors.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    While The Art of the Steal makes a very convincing – even bone-chilling – argument that the people and foundations that essentially hijacked the Barnes Foundation are primarily concerned with tourist dollars and not the preservation of Barnes' legacy, the film fails to even ponder why easier access to some of the world's greatest art treasures might not be an entirely bad thing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sisley is a former stand-up comic, although you'd never guess it here: Finding himself in the eye of a colossal shit storm of his own making, his Vincent is brusque and action oriented, his face, a picture of ulceration in progress.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Rush, a film about two real-life titans of Formula One racing in the Seventies, splits its narrative between these oil-and-water personalities, which feels about right: It's only half of a good movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Just as marriage does not banish aloneness, proximity to the characters onscreen doesn't unlock any special connection to them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In an age of doggedly unambitious comedy, one marvels at the finesse these first-time screenwriters and director Feig bring to marrying raunch, romantic comedy, and the tested but ever-true bond between women.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The issue of late-term abortions tends to inspire polemics from both sides of the debate; Shane and Wilson’s approach – sensitive, measured, workmanlike – is a welcome one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard truths to be found in Finding Vivian Maier (really, how could there be?), but it’s an engrossing doc nevertheless – a portrait of an American artist hiding in plain sight, a mystery with too few clues, and a sincere inquiry into how best to divine the wishes of the dead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The camera may dive deep, but the content skims mere surface.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hunger Games franchise, both in print and onscreen, has been exceptionally clever about cozying away imaginative space for fans to fill in the blanks and cast themselves in the rich drama. That this latest film leaves us hungering for more only means that it’s working.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Appropriately belongs to Lopez. His mannequin glaze and never-wavering smile provide more creepy-crawlies than a thousand quivering violins or perfectly timed thunderclaps.