Kimberley Jones
Select another critic »
For 681 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 The Women
Score distribution:
681 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers no doubt had a hell of a time whittling the material down; unfortunately, what they came up with was something long on the mundaneness of GovWorks.com and short on the personalities behind it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Appropriately belongs to Lopez. His mannequin glaze and never-wavering smile provide more creepy-crawlies than a thousand quivering violins or perfectly timed thunderclaps.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    These women are marvelous, with ancient, creased faces and the kind of admirable f...-all attitude that comes with age. I couldn't take my eyes off them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard truths to be found in Finding Vivian Maier (really, how could there be?), but it’s an engrossing doc nevertheless – a portrait of an American artist hiding in plain sight, a mystery with too few clues, and a sincere inquiry into how best to divine the wishes of the dead.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morris has found a real character in McKinney, but to what end, I couldn't say.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It gives the illusion of a conclusion and cuts to black before it has to answer for how many more questions have been raised.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As for that central question: Yep, it’s art, all right. One only wishes they’d gotten down to the business of it sooner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s worth a watch to see these two reliably comic actors do some heavy dramatic lifting and tenderly spot for each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Capitalizes on the audience’s familiarity with the many players and their complex backstories, but never advances the ball down the field, tenders no new thought or wrinkle to the franchise. It’s the difference between a diverting entertainment, and a riveting one.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Understandably, a filmmaker tackling the retelling of a national hero must do so with great delicacy, but The Sea Inside presents not so much a hero as a saint in Sampredo.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Nolan’s end-act pacing has always felt ponderous – but it’s not enough to ruin what is surely the most intellectually and viscerally engaging action film in years. The soul doesn’t stir, no, but everything else is wildly somersaulting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Serenity evinces the kind of swashbuckling bonhomie that made so many of us fall in love with the original "Star Wars" films, a love that was mightily tested by George Lucas' humorless prequels.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Like a kindler, gentler "Bully," Mean Creek hinges on the bullied fighting back against the aggressor, but offers a more expansive examination of aggression and, even more significantly, passivity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Winnie the Pooh doesn't reinvent the wheel, just gives it an affectionate spin, and that is no more and no less than what one would hope from a family reunion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are good guys we don't care much about and bad guys that we do and even badder guys we're supposed to hate. But on the sliding scale of culpability, everybody's just a few clicks away from the next guy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Throughout, the documentary is fun and engaging, even whimsical when using (to good effect) illustrations and Gilliam’s own storyboards.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Burrus has a face that does all the talking for him -- deep creases, sad eyes, and a gray hue that hangs over him like a rain cloud. It's a remarkable performance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There’s gore, all right, although the real terror lies in the tease, and the often dark, herky-jerky DV format ratchets up the tension to an almost unbearable degree.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There’s an undeniable thrill to watching something so experimental and yet totally accessible to those of us who speak only layman’s Dylanese, and it’s Haynes’ warmest film yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's the tortoise and the hare, Nepalese-style, and it's surprisingly dramatic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All herky-jerky camera movements and no pussyfooting around with the interior lives of these characters.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Forget divining who’s predator and who’s prey. Everybody’s chum here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Cornish, in her first film seen stateside, is astonishing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Leaves you scratching your head a bit, wondering what just happened, and worrying if maybe it could happen to you too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    First, to dispel the two talking points attending The Impossible, Juan Antonio Bayona's dramatization of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: No, it's not racist, and no, you don't have to be a parent to feel the film in your bones.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Although Super Size Me benefits from a number of interviews with nutritionists, lobbyists, lawyers, and the like, the film inevitably (but not unenjoyably) is dominated by Spurlock, who offers his sober-minded statistics and cheeky asides without ever devolving into an off-putting Michael Moore-like moralizing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Roger Michell and his frequent writer Hanif Kureishi (their last film together was Venus) regularly dance to the very cliff’s edge of despair, and only for the grace of good casting do you not wish they’d just jump and get it over with.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A rare achievement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Linklater has crafted an always genial and at times even joyful period charmer about that moment on the cusp: before a boy becomes a man and another man becomes a mythological figure.