For 1,253 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kyle Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 100 Last Days in Vietnam
Lowest review score: 0 September Dawn
Score distribution:
1,253 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Provides a different take on its subject than many of us are accustomed to: Nelson Mandela is no Martin Luther King Jr., and he was far more radical than even Malcolm X. If you’re under the impression that his ideas got him imprisoned for 25 years, think again: It was his bombs.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Destined to enchant the slumber parties.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Suggestion: When making a film called Run Fat Boy Run, how about hiring a fat boy?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A supernatural take on "Death Wish" meets "Faust," Heartless is an uneasy mixture of B-movie shocks, social commentary and sentimentality that shows a potent imagination at work.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    There's a geyser of ambition in the visually stunning The Fountain, but the story of a thousand-year quest for the Fountain of Youth eventually trickles out.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    For a kiddie adventure, the movie, based on the Jeanne DuPrau book, has a pleasingly moody, eerie quality.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The dialogue isn't ridiculous, and sometimes it's witty: A cynical cop (Donnie Wahlberg) doesn't buy Jamie's theory that the doll had something to do with the murder: "The mystery toy department is down the hall. This is the homicide department."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Shailene Woodley, already a subtle and rangy actress, easily carries the film as Hazel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    On the one hand, Black Book has the artiness of subtitles, the dramatic weight of history, and the desperate heroics of Jews hiding from Nazis. On the other hand, it has Paul Verhoeven.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Any movie that finds a plausible reason to give Lindsay Lohan a nun's habit and a machine gun is worth your attention.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Good grindhouse fun until a last act that's like a meeting of a psychoanalysts' convention.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Although the payoff is creepy, it takes a little too long to arrive -- and when it does, it's about as worn-out as the movie's title.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Just when things should be getting exciting and complex, they become repetitive and predictable. Subtext becomes hint becomes statement becomes declaration. For once, Pinter is a little too easy to understand.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Final Destination 5, which, despite its lowbrow story, turns out to be one of the fastest-moving films of the year, is a suspenseful and macabre exercise in dread for the absurdly cosseted.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An entertaining but routine rock flick.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    First-time writer-director Andy Muschietti, an Argentine discovered by Guillermo del Toro, relies too much, especially in the early going, on horror clichés (sudden loud noises and jagged blasts of music), but he does make the tension hum.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Rio 2 is not what I would call Amazon prime, but it’s got enough silly songs and daffy critters to keep the little ones happy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It has a pleasing smallness -- it's cinematic chamber music -- that almost makes you overlook its inability to really explain its subject.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Arch, wry and dry, with its exquisite wallpaper and impeccably blocked fedoras, Married Life is bracingly malicious noir for a while, a sort of gray-flannel-suit take on the Coen brothers' "Blood Simple." Every character seems morally capable of anything.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It has a certain commitment to its cause, and by that I mean it supplies the necessary flayings, slayings, beheadings and, um, a be-nose-ing, all of it dancing to the tune of those amusingly stilted He-Man declaratives - King James Bible cadences applied to comic-book visions. It knows it's a B movie, and gets on with it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A wet, red chunk of pulp that knows what it is and doesn't care.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It isn't every day that one witnesses, via a camera mounted with the driver, some of the final images in a man's life before he crashes into a wall at enormous speed. Whether you'll feel good about yourself after watching is up to you.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    On the M. Night Shyamalan scale of stupid endings, The Prestige isn't as bad as "The Village" but it's comparable to "Unbreakable."
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It is a better option than the third "Santa Clause."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Willis is at his relaxed best this time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An uneasy mix of Richard Linklater and Abbott and Costello, Prince Avalanche is an oddment, but one that brings some small, peculiar pleasures.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A boldly original undertaking: It's the first movie ever to come up with the idea of remaking "The Truman Show."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A Most Violent Year is a small picture, but each brushstroke is laden with detail and craftsmanship.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Melding a morality play with a glossy soap, Italy’s Human Capital is a fairly successful balance of entertainment and ideas.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Maybe the Midwest isn't actually like this, but if it were, would that be so bad?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This is grim, bleak material that at times is monotonous, but its woe feels authentic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    In To Rome With Love, Allen approaches the leitmotif in a strange, oblique and interesting way. I fear, though, that the Italian entry in his "Let's Go: Grab Some Euro-Film Subsidies" period will be remembered as being forgettable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Bug
    Buzzes around in random menace for an hour until its third act, when - zzzzzt! - it flies straight into the zapper.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    That's My Boy is pretty raunchy, and by "pretty," I mean "amazingly," as in Howard Stern- or Seth MacFarlane-style gags.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film has enough funny lines and weird situations - some comedy business with a sex chair lovingly constructed by the Clooney character is the highlight - that it could age into a cult film like "The Big Lebowski."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Alfred Molina gives a warm and engaging performance as an occupying British soldier.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    All three segments are heavy on blame-America speeches, which may be a fair snapshot of Iraqi opinion, but it's strange how fond Longley seems to be of Saddam Hussein.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    One of the pleasures of films about being stuck in a place -- "The Wicker Man" is maybe the best example -- comes from the skill with which the writers keep their protagonist locked in his box. On this test, The Last Exorcism pretty much flunks.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Thanks to an unexpected twist and a clever motivation lurking in the back story of the super-villain, G-Force has enough going on to more or less maintain grown-up interest, and there's plenty to please the kiddies.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It's fine for kids, though, and it doesn't try too hard.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This is a one-joke skit that trots in a straight line, and your enjoyment of it will depend entirely on how many times you need to see gonzo sheep rip out human entrails.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Not many surprises are in store, but the film’s affection for the dramatist is pleasing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The best Parisian action movie of the week is District 13: Ultimatum, a serviceable thriller with a lefty message.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    So what starts out as fascinating sci-fi becomes just fi, and winds up pulp fi.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    All of this is secondary, even tertiary material, even if much of it is interesting and even wrenching to behold.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    What begins as an alert and witty barbed satire degenerates into a senseless bloodbath in the black comedy Sightseers.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The insult comedy is sometimes brilliant.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This Michael Mann-directed film is full of Michael Mann-isms, many of them familiar from, and done better in, “Heat.”
    • 94 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Stretched both timewise and for plausibility.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film's attempt at a sort of beautiful anguish works best in its middle section. It takes far too long to get going, and it doesn't have much of an ending.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    "Babe" was a classic because of its gentle simplicity. Charlotte's Web, with its insistently "magical" theme music, an overbearing climax and a trough full of bad jokes, is merely adequate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film is occasionally heavy-handed, and the priest character is almost absurdly saintly, but there is an awful power to scenes such as one in which the Europeans are evacuated on trucks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The movie has enough big-city wickedness and merry cruelty to keep things skittering unpredictably.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Though thin on story, the film shows poise and vision, using bleak cinema-realité techniques with chilling effect. Campos promises to be heard from again.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The movie is at its best when Gekko gets back into the game, with his impish smile and his perfect hair.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Its characters are likable enough to settle in with for a pleasant hour and a half.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    On a technical level Buried is impressive, at times blisteringly suspenseful.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    There can only ever be one Bad Lieutenant: Harvey Keitel. In Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans, Nicolas Cage, pretend tough guy (Malibu accent, long floppy coiffure, nervous smile), is more like the Bad Used-Car Salesman.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    France's friendship dramedy Little White Lies is such a blatant rip-off of a far better American movie that it could have been called "Le Big Chill."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The gorgeous heartache of songs by the group Belle and Sebastian gives God Help the Girl its dreamy appeal, but thanks to a poky story line it essentially amounts to a series of music videos.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The atmosphere is convincing - there is an "Eight Mile" desperation to Raya's plight - but nothing makes sense.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The chatty killer and the nervy atmosphere are both so depraved that the film, though it contains hardly any explicit violence, is like stepping into a blood Jacuzzi, and there is a biblical severity to the ending.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This one-sided documentary, told entirely by supporters, paints Swartz as a hero pursued by malign forces.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Gritty visuals and a strong central performance elevate the routine crime story at the heart of Sweden's Easy Money, a sort of mash-up of "Goodfellas" and "The Great Gatsby."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Possibly the least sexy vampire flick ever to crawl out of the crypt (it never occurs to anyone that biting someone's neck is kinda intimate; the act is strictly utilitarian), but it's unusually detailed in its imagining.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    For short stretches, the movie has a touch of surreal "Office Space" brilliance, but it's broadly acted, its characters are thin, and the production values are ragged. Still, it's hard to resist its goofy hostility: "You're like the drummer from REO Speedwagon. Nobody knows who you are."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    As familiar as the costumes and decoration are, the conflicts are unsettlingly vivid and strange.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Though a bit stiff in the joints and acted by an undistinguished cast amid TV-movie trappings, this low-budget adaptation of Ayn Rand's novel nevertheless contains a fire and a fury that makes it more compelling than the average mass-produced studio item.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The script, narrated by Queen Latifah, is so embarrassingly dorky (it was co-written by Kristin Gore) that it's like Fred Rogers gone hip-hop.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Reflective but only mildly engaging dramedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    I won't reveal the twist -- but the marketing crew is aware that their only chance of selling this non-mind-blowing documentary about the people you might meet on Facebook is by promising a big surprise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Fascinating though it is, the movie is thin on historical materials.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A clever setup that harkens back to “You’ve Got Mail” and “The Shop Around the Corner” doesn’t quite pay off in India’s warm-hearted comedy-drama The Lunchbox.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It’s photographically yummy, heaving with sun-dappled vistas and four-star dining. The boys float around a bit in the sea and enjoy homemade pasta while trundling out their impressions of, say, Marlon Brando.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The beginning and end are classics.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Despite the pace, though -- pedal, have you met my friend metal? -- Ninja Assassin still has some of its best stuff left at the end, when the master returns to demonstrate his extra-special, super-most-deadliest technique.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It's all a gorgeous error, a bonfire of overreach.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Morris is likely to disappoint liberals in The Unknown Known by failing to take down an apparently weak target.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It’s adequately visionary, it’s routinely spectacular, it breathes fire and yet somehow feels room-temperature.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It's got enough going on to sustain five blockbuster thrillers. That is its blessing and its curse.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A black-and-white fantasia shot against a bright backdrop of famous sites, and it has potential to be a cult hit on its dreamy-hipster look alone.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    There's plenty of smash, thunder and brawl for the kids. But in taking a bit of Hulk and a bit of Superman while re-imagining Excalibur as a hammer, Thor amounts to putting new horns on old ideas. And the screenplay sounds like the lyrics of Spinal Tap.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An intriguingly Hitchcockian premise gradually takes on a preposterous air in the art-world noir The Best Offer.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    I kept hoping the meaning would click into place, but it never quite did.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Wilkinson's reflective and regretful searcher, burdened by secrets, is also touching, as are Dench and Nighy's creations, so it's easy to cheer them on as they inch toward revelations and rebirth.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Like Provence itself, Auteuil is in no hurry to get anywhere, reveling instead in the southern region's brilliant light and whispering crickets. His tangy accent and evident fondness for his character make the picture enjoyable enough as it plods along, and the final act wraps things up on a fulfilling note.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film’s mix of elements of “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” and “Bad Santa” is amusing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Cédric Klapisch’s film is meandering and cutesy, but his characters are endearing and every so often he comes up with a deft insight, such as how this city’s streets are like a flayed zombie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    As a French Resistance thriller, Free Men is so-so, but it is driven by a mischievously interesting idea: that Muslims and Jews have more in common than they normally allow.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It wouldn't be right to say that, half an hour after Kung Fu Panda 2 ended, I was starving for laughs again. In truth, I was starving pretty much all the way through.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Though far too long for its wisp of a plot, this stylish film has a nerve-cinching grip that makes it more alarming than most horror flicks, let alone most movies about a couple having a tiff.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A decent football movie, just about good enough to be the 40th best episode of "Friday Night Lights" . . . which has aired 39 episodes.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Funny and promising as the first act is, the entire second act is pretty awful, as the script chucks in one tiresome, unlikely gag after another.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A disarming but low-impact documentary that amounts to an odd dual biopic, Shepard & Dark can feel a bit like intruding on a conversation between two old friends.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The big new addition in Shrek the Third is Justin Timberlake as the high school-age future King Arthur, but if Timberlake contributed a song to the soundtrack it would have to be "WhinyBack."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Annabelle is mostly a grab into the Great Big Bag O’ Horror Clichés: sound-bombs of shrieking violins explode randomly, doors slam unbidden, rocking chairs creak by themselves, machines suddenly whir to life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The movie is just a situation salad, at least until the end, when things start to pull together a bit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The movie jogs along nicely without ever getting a case of the stupids; far from being a bloated “John Carter,” it’s just a pared-down yarn of survival: “Die Hard” on a planet.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film is primarily interested in the music that accompanied this turmoil, which is a bit like covering the American Revolution with the focus on the wigs Washington and Jefferson wore.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    You may protest that this is just a splattery feature-length sketch, and you’d be absolutely right. Why not have a laugh at this absurdly trite concept? I’ll take the cheesy breeziness of “CVZ” over the frowny somberness of “World War Z” any day.

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