Lisa Alspector
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For 529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lisa Alspector's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Chuck & Buck
Lowest review score: 0 Whatever It Takes
Score distribution:
529 movie reviews
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Demands to be treated with conviction as parody if not as science fiction.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    This mild thriller's consistently dark atmosphere makes the scene-of-the-crime tableaux...transcend exploitation and even suggest a kind of feminist odyssey.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The twists and revelations of this rigorous noir reduce it to canned psychodrama.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    An open-mindedness in the plotting of this romantic comedy set on Ireland's Donegal coast adds a couple of mild surprises to the story.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Disturbing--if less sophisticated than the best SF (science fiction)-horror TV.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The script, which infantilizes one of the older siblings as much as the father does, undermines its own admonitions against parents and adult children meddling in one another's lives.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The lawyer is marvelously played by Evelina Fernandez, who wrote the screenplay based on her play.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Because so many female characters spend so much time trying to seduce Harrelson (usually successfully), the notion that multiplicity enhances intrigue is pretty worn out by the time any duplicity is revealed.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    I never thought I'd see a slapstick animal action movie about the beauty of interracial relationships and nonmarital sex, but that's what this is, and kids seem to love it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Takes too long to get its themes and characters out on the field.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Has the enthusiasm and naivete of a first feature.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The Griswolds, headed by Chevy Chase, are taking what could be one of their last family vacations.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Not unlike "Eyes Wide Shut," this is an eerily earnest contemplation of fidelity, and it's pitched as farce.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    DeVito's low-key midlife crisis is consistently moving, but Spacey, saddled with the role of provocateur, is demonically boring.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    It's a bitter story played for humor, in which a callous character is never quite allowed to see herself as such.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The feminist veneer is the most deeply disturbing part of this callow thriller, whose fetishizing of a dead woman's body (and a live woman's sexual behavior) is far more questionable than anything even "The Silence of the Lambs" has been accused of.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Antonio Banderas signs up for charisma lessons from Anthony Hopkins -- but they just don't take.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The makers of this eclectically animated adventure, a follow-up to "The Rugrats Movie," know their audience, though all the "Godfather" references will be thoroughly puzzling to at least half of it.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    This underdog comedy and its title character have considerable charm.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Arch yet earnest.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    A series of stunts with bears and lots of stage fighting involving characters who are unambiguously good or evil.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Its charm and humor will be overshadowed for some by the exploitation of gay stereotypes--which is ironic, since their arch usage ultimately allows the movie to be progressive, if only slightly.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The narrative emphasizes coincidences, but they're nicely understated. If it didn't seem gimmicky and self-indulgent...the movie might be more affecting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Stylishly realized, but its striking cinematography, nontraditional editing, and consistently reflexive use of genre conceits add up as methodically as a math problem.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Slower, more earnest, and not as gory.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The ingenious if erratic slickness is disorienting and makes the movie more like drama than journalism.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Pales in comparison to the controversial "Life Is Beautiful"--a more provocative fiction, if only because it's even less realist.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    This watchable 1998 psychothriller deflects its cliches with canted angles, metonymic cropping, and a creeping pace, making it as much a parsing of "Twilight Zone"-brand irony as an example of it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Self-congratulatory feature, which artificially exalts the character--a classic saint with clay feet--by casting a grande dame and by reducing her motives to facile psychodrama
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The gangster-movie plot, themes, and allusions aren't nearly as intriguing as the earnestly kitschy black-and-white wide-screen images or the mesmerizing, minimalist sound effects.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Has an adolescent energy and a tempered sexuality.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Elmo's obsessive reaction is never examined, compromising the ability of this rambling minor spectacle to put across its obvious lesson about sharing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The filmmakers realize that playing baseball isn't nearly enough to fix what's wrong in these kids' lives, which might have made a more provocative ending than what follows.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    If spelling out stereotypes were inherently funny the movie would be a hoot.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The childish humor and sensationalistic effects undercut the movie's philosophical agenda.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Leaking platitudes and cutesy ambience, this comedy folds a smarmy, social-issue subplot into a Saturday-morning-kids'-show sensibility; it's full of geeky gadgetry, and must've been a lot more fun to make than it is to watch.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Sometimes come together exquisitely.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Nobody ever shuts up in this schmaltzy, mannered drama.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Two obnoxious, swaggering brothers -- whose sexual naivete is supposed to make them endearing as well as pathetic -- find happiness in this more schmaltzy than funny Saturday Night Live spin-off.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Director Ron Howard makes too much of camera and editing tricks, as if momentarily confusing us about where a character is or which character's point of view the movie is taking will somehow deepen the narrative.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The perfectly acceptable shtick executed by Williams--whose I-know-you-better-than-you-know-yourself seduction techniques ought to make him a hotter leading man--occasionally justifies the relentlessly light tone of this preachy 1998 comedy-drama.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The plot keeps switching tracks.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Not even supercool Robert De Niro can enliven this boring tale about a team of mercenary operatives.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Told from too many perspectives, the narrative puts suspense above substance, and its social consciousness seems contrived.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Writer Philip Stark ("That '70s Show") and director Danny Leiner ("Freaks and Geeks") apply mature comic instincts to an adolescent genre.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The best short on this program of five is Bradley Rust Gray's 18-minute "Hitch."
    • 21 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Sweetly mediocre.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Sappy.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Its blurring of the line between parody and exploitation only makes it totally innocuous.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    This serious if assaultively stylish meditation on faith uses traditional elements of religion-based horror in a way that's more innocent than calculating.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Instead of a credible main character this 1999 button pusher has lots of showy cinematography and generic dread.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The comic timing and Gibson's mugging are skillful, but the movie fulfills expectations of plot twists and ironic atmosphere only after having made clear that it won't be offering much else.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Big, schmaltzy melodrama with mini melodramas.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Bruce Willis's marvelous performance as a contract killer only makes everything else about this comedy seem more pathetic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The plot is more convenient than intriguing, the characters more cartoonish than iconic--especially the heroine, who grapples with feminism in a way that should have been fascinating.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The more pathetic the role, the more evident Robin Williams's conscientiousness--but his professionalism doesn't make this fantasy worthwhile.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Time and space are condensed by means both elegant and crafty, and rarely are any of the characters made to be more--or less--than allegorical.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    All the movie's free-form horror phenomena might have been more interesting if the plot didn't keep insisting on a systematic explanation for them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Somewhat depressive anecdote drawn out to feature length.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Overwhelmingly grisly.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The scenes set on earth--messy, predictable satire about the commercial exploitation of fevered genius. The unconscious/underworld scenes may be boring because neosurrealism is a cliche.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The draggy narrative of this 1997 comedy is tough to sit through--there are even several overproduced musical numbers--but it does have an intriguing subversive element that I don't want to give away.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The acting--especially Dreyfuss's ability to roll with the mood swings--is impressive if not redemptive.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    An ounce of self-awareness about its almost gleeful use of cliches would have improved this dance soap opera.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Geek-triumphs-after-all comedies can be charming, but in this one the triumphing begins so early it's hard to feel for the geek.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    This earnest yet cynical drama makes the gang-infiltration genre seem exhausted.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Yet another unironic war movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The rest of these animated sequences...depend on gimmickry, cuteness, or facile ideology, and don't come close to demonstrating the complex relationship between sound and image found in "The Sorcerer's Apprentice."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The clunky plot is set in Santa Fe, and includes a foil character who might as well wear a sign on his forehead.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Pesci proves he can act his way through anything.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    This 1998 movie is essentially a compilation of things-aren't-what-they-seem games played on the viewer; all its little tricks, including Ricci's snide and smart-alecky voice-overs about movie conventions, are really old--except one. But it's not worth the wait.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Neither good nor terrible.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Oscar baiting is the main point of this unintentionally silly drama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Stodgy storytelling and a hyperbolic score reduce their experiences to melodrama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Hokey.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    An intriguing noir whose conceptual sophistication is partly undermined by naive execution.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Satisfying in small ways.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Rowan Atkinson's recalcitrant TV character is the hub of this 1997 feature that will disappoint fans and nonfans alike.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Never seems to find its tone.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Nat Mauldin and Larry Levin's screenplay, indifferently directed by Betty Thomas, is simply an excuse for tired scatological jokes involving animal characters with the voices of well-known actors.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The tectonic shifts in this camp-horror extravaganza are unsettling.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Cliched narrative, which isn't funny as often as seems intended.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Clunky and obvious.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    All of this comedy's jokes are old.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The feature has some lovely effects.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    A narrative that tries to juggle thriller elements, tons of pop culture imagery, and way too much philosophical baggage.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Olympia Dukakis and Illeana Douglas come off poorly in silly supporting roles that make Aniston seem to have screen presence by default. Her character's habit of compulsively adjusting her bodice ensures our attention has the proper focus.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The buildup to social criticism in what at first appears to be pointless and partly misogynist exploitation is subtly impressive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Partly because the seducer's technique is methodical--as a former conquest explains to the naive heroine--the movie's answers are too easy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Blends extremes of violence and humor to create an irreverent tone that nullifies everything; the plot is so clever it crushes the characterization, making all the action seem perfunctory.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The result is an exploitation movie that seems like it's about something -- though what exactly I couldn't say.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    It's all corny and contrived and usually sensitive. The filmmakers even dare to show the effects of illness--a subject frequently glamorized to the point of being insulting--in a love scene of rare honesty.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunet ("Delicatessen") bend over so far backward to make Weaver's and Ryder's roles beefy that they end up mocking the characters' bravura.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Ultimately this is a sharp-focus issue movie, decrying intolerance as it explores the effects of labeling, the complexity of fetishizing, and the differences between business and crime.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    A better disaster movie than it is a thriller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    This 1998 romantic comedy mostly bores with its cumbersome exposition and close-ups of trivial objects scattered throughout lackluster montage sequences.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Romantic comedy is set mainly in NYC, where the plight of its ambivalent lovers seems particularly trivial.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    The ultimately uncomplicated view of sexual and emotional violence in a family is only tragic, not insightful.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    A cute send-up of preadolescent stereotypes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Lisa Alspector
    Becomes blandly idealistic.

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