Lisa Alspector
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For 529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lisa Alspector's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Chuck & Buck
Lowest review score: 0 Whatever It Takes
Score distribution:
529 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Writer-director Aiyana Elliott gives her father his due in this evenhanded yet impassioned documentary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This 'heartwarming' thriller refuses to distinguish realism from stylization, and much of the plot is a twisted mess of repetition and unpersuasive motivation.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A pleasure.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The hinted romance, featuring Aaliyah, makes for some decent drama and some fine comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This insidiously complex satire is filled with apparent digressions, and our complete identification with the man occurs so gradually that it's impossible to pinpoint just when our previous disdain becomes a position of relative comfort.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Chillingly beautiful cinematography makes the state's landscapes appear timeless as it sets the stage for a grim history told with archival portraits.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Though it strives for broad humor, pushing cuteness and light irony, this bland 1998 movie isn't exactly a comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Visually imaginative and even persuasively spiritual.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A mildly psychological suspense thriller with military trappings.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Luc Besson--and Andrew Birkin wrote the pandering, adolescent screenplay for this pseudosubversive hagiography, and nearly every scene screams out its sensationalist intent, though few actually achieve the status of spectacle.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's hard to tell whether these characters are meant to seem as staunchly symbolic as they do when they deliver some of the back-story-heavy dialogue.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Engagingly corny drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This bright noir, with gleaming cinematography by Jeffrey Jur, is as single-minded as a short story, but the premise is almost too clever.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This gently satirical farce is atmospheric when dabbling in religion--the chef turns to spiritual magic to defuse her passion for her husband--and moving during her heart-to-hearts with her friend.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's all very impressive without being particularly enthralling.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Beautifully regenerates the Jay Ward TV show its characters were based on.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    In a lumbering way, this depressing feel-good drama about the impact of cancer on two children, their divorced parents, and the father's girlfriend offers some useful insights into how feelings of jealousy and betrayal can limit the potential of family relationships.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The movie, which leans too heavily on the metaphorical value of the two historic events, dives from heady romance into heavy moralizing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Its depiction of teenage behavior appears calculated to seem irreverent while satisfying expectations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Until the story diverges from a similar agenda, the gags about the daily grind and what happens when a drone forgets how to be submissive make for beautifully low-key satire, and the caricatures of office types seem clever.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The running joke about coffee enemas will date this innocuous, crowd-pleasing adventure comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The vicarious catharsis offered by this adaptation of Anna Quindlen's novel is as efficient as that of any family-affected-by-illness drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The connection between his boasting about killing and killing so he can boast about it -- is made beautifully insidious.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This special-effects animal-action comedy is for heavily identified pet owners.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The deliberately obvious equating of knife throwing with sex would be funnier if it weren't so serious, and the undercut eroticism is part of what makes the movie themeless, merely a conceptual exercise.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's marvelous or unwatchable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Though I hate to ruin the complex experience of following a rather calm story about a lonely widower as it becomes something else, I feel obliged to point out that the hard-core gore and soft-core surrealism of this baroque morality play may not support any theme.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A businessman is visited by an otherworldly presence who has the nerve to fall in love with his daughter in this savory, extralong feature, whose obvious plotlines unfold with an almost painful slowness that somehow makes them deeper.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Much of the three-hour movie takes place in the prison, but the resonant characterization, expansive plotting, and judicious use of exterior locations and flashbacks remove any sense of claustrophobia or sluggishness.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Isn't terribly frightening or gory, and at times it's even atmospheric. It also has a sense of humor, and the digs at the prequels hit pay dirt.