Lisa Alspector
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For 529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lisa Alspector's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Tarzan
Lowest review score: 0 Whatever It Takes
Score distribution:
529 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    As the driven competitor who learns to make hubris work for him, Jared Leto gives a complex performance that suggests a deep, intriguing interior to the character even as he maintains a convincing one-dimensional facade.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There's tenderness, humor, a gratuitous body double, and splashy lighting in this ho-hum action drama, which takes itself at times too seriously and at other times not seriously enough.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This fairly serious meditation on conventionality and monogamy blames his ennui on external forces, remaining adolescent even when it suggests its hero has grown up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    An admirable if frequently soporific 1992 adaptation of Norman Maclean's account of life in Missoula, Montana.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Includes extensive performance footage but never drags, and it isn't exposé or self-mockery.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    As an undiscovered beauty who frequents open-stage night at the local performance-art club, her rack hidden under paint-spattered overalls, her chiseled face obscured by glasses, Rachael Leigh Cook is charming and sincere, and ultimately so is Prinze, whose character's realization that he's not as shallow as he'd thought is convincing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Poor execution sometimes points up the difference between the telling of a story and the story itself--in this case, without diminishing the power of the latter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The force of the social criticism is diminished by contrivance and the inclusion of peripheral material.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Doesn't quite support the weight of its allegory.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The script, which infantilizes one of the older siblings as much as the father does, undermines its own admonitions against parents and adult children meddling in one another's lives.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Nicely toned.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The lawyer is marvelously played by Evelina Fernandez, who wrote the screenplay based on her play.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    This thriller largely succeeds in putting quotation marks around its use of genre conventions, mixing subtlety and overkill to create a pensive mood that transcends the plot.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    This watchable 1998 psychothriller deflects its cliches with canted angles, metonymic cropping, and a creeping pace, making it as much a parsing of "Twilight Zone"-brand irony as an example of it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The violence is suggested in a way that's neither overwhelming nor insulting to a child's intelligence as this crafty fairy tale ultimately finds a way for human and vampire characters to live and let live.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Arch yet earnest.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    A series of stunts with bears and lots of stage fighting involving characters who are unambiguously good or evil.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Unfortunately the allegory tends to overpower the characterizations even as it deepens them.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Has the enthusiasm and naivete of a first feature.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The ingenious if erratic slickness is disorienting and makes the movie more like drama than journalism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The movie's strength is in its comedy; a tragic subplot feels merely manipulative.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The gangster-movie plot, themes, and allusions aren't nearly as intriguing as the earnestly kitschy black-and-white wide-screen images or the mesmerizing, minimalist sound effects.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Nothing's wrong with this movie--the hockey footage is exciting, the characters quirky, the subplots idiosyncratic--but nothing's special about it either.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Elmo's obsessive reaction is never examined, compromising the ability of this rambling minor spectacle to put across its obvious lesson about sharing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The unusually thoughtful dialogue and soul-searching performances make this romantic drama seem deeper than it is.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    This culinary fantasy is mildly inspired.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The new sexism -- the old sexism plus the idea that everything is ironic -- is getting old.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    The filmmakers have created a pretentious extended "Twilight Zone" episode with obscenely high production values.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Its charm and humor will be overshadowed for some by the exploitation of gay stereotypes--which is ironic, since their arch usage ultimately allows the movie to be progressive, if only slightly.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Lisa Alspector
    Demands that we see as coincidental if not ironic the ease with which Fraser cuts a rug at a swing club when he's hopelessly naive about everything else that's being revived in the 90s when he emerges.