Maitland McDonagh

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For 2,232 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Maitland McDonagh's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Dark Knight
Lowest review score: 0 Terror Firmer
Score distribution:
2232 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Often rings painfully true, but would have benefited from judicious editing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Weighty and downbeat though that sounds, Delpy's film is delightfully light, especially when it's parsing the infinite variety of horrible French cabbies.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    An excellent introduction to the subject, and a movie buff's delight.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    The film rests on Depp's evocation of Barrie's gentle, playfulness and deeply buried sorrows; it's difficult to imagine another actor so gracefully evoking Barrie's childlike qualities without seeming creepy or emotionally malformed, and only the hard of heart will come away dry-eyed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Not for all tastes, but produces haunting juxtapositions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Inventive visuals and funny bits abound, but the film's gritty look and unsentimental characterizations - Harry, Hermione and Ron are far from golden teens - ominously foreshadow the truly wicked shape of things to come.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Frankenheimer pretty much ignores everything that's happened in the action and thriller genres since 1975, and mostly that's a good thing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Tony Scott's thriller is flashy, but it's not dead stupid and it's never dull.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Capably directed by Betty Thomas, this freewheeling pseudodocumentary tribute to Stern's juvenile antics paints the anarchic radio idol as Everyschmo made good.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    While Costner the actor clearly imagines himself the Gary Cooper of the 21st century, he's got a crude sentimental streak that Costner the director fails to curtail.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Scenemaker Dito Montiel's rough, grating memoir of growing up in a poor, violent section of Astoria, Queens, in the mid-1980s features a few too many arty flourishes, but also packs a raw power that's hard to shake.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Its high-definition video images -- are coated with a convincing sheen of disgust, and Huston's performance is riveting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Yash Chopra's thinly veiled plea for reconciliation between India and Pakistan is cloaked in a decades-spanning Romeo-and-Juliet romance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Colorful and deceptively buoyant until it suddenly pulls the rug out from under you.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Katzir's documentary is as much a labor of love as Spaisman's theater, and it's often rough around the edges.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Foster finds the common ground on which his eclectic cast can meet (no small feat when they range from brassy Queen Latifah to "Arrested Development"'s deadpan Tony Hale) and keeps the story's sweetness from devolving into saccharine kitsch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's Buck Rogers-style graphics are cool, but the shrilly squabbling brothers -- realistic though they may be -- are insufferable, the story's your-turn/my-turn structure is tedious, and its relentlessly reiterated message about brotherly love and cooperation is really grating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    The trouble with this precious fable isn't that the Whitmans are self-absorbed ninnies: It's that they aren't characters at all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    Their mania might be funny if it weren't so creepy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Anchored by Friel and Williams's exceptional performances, the film's power lies in its complexity. Nothing is black and white, starting with the girls' complicated relationships with their parents, which are simultaneously nurturing and fraught with psychological peril.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    It's tremendously clever, but ultimately pointless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Would be funny if it weren't so horrifying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    What do you get when you cross a serial-killer movie with a sappy father/son drama and give it a time-travel twist?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Slight and whimsical.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Diop Gaï's performance is equally beguiling: She's both bold and mysterious, a femme fatale bursting with life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Crowder and Dower's film is a refreshing reminder that without Ross and the Erteguns, pundits would have had to coin an entirely different term to describe "soccer moms," since without the Cosmos' brief and shining moment in the sun, suburban soccer leagues would be as rare as collegiate boccie tournaments.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Maitland McDonagh
    The film rests entirely on Poupaud's shoulders, and he rises to the demands of a complex, deeply unsympathetic role.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's measured pace may put off impatient viewers, but the brilliantly underplayed ending is worth the wait.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    The irony is that Shakur's speaking voice is the film's greatest asset: His transformation from eager-to-please teenager to gangsta icon is vividly apparent in the sound bites.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Stone, the master of the epic conspiracy and the operatic spectacle of diametrically opposed forces at war for men's souls, is so entangled in the trees that he's lost sight of the forest -- who could have imagined?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's heart is Magdiel and the modest dreams that get him through the day but may also be the death of him.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    A quirky charmer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    If the movie overall had the bitter brio of Malcolm McDowell's brief turn as Globecom guru Teddy K, a Franken-mogul stitched together from bits of Richard Branson, Barry Diller and Rupert Murdoch, it would be a pointed black comedy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Less a sequel than a variation on a haunting theme -- the nature and origins of humanity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    The competition between man and machine is fogged by distrust and obfuscation. And for now, the result is a draw.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Maitland McDonagh
    Camille's desperate, destructive antics just don't seem especially cute or funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Picking up some 10 years after the previous film left off, this stripped-down, intelligently conceived follow-up is a respectable conclusion to the Terminator trilogy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    An illuminating glimpse into what goes on in the dance studio.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    While most anthology films have one standout and one weak link, all three tales are short, sharp shockers -- there should be at least one for every taste.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    What divides opinion is the film's tone: Are those naive, portentous pronouncements about media, voyeurism and the numbing, pornographic allure of atrocity footage a sly reflection of the YouTube generation's boundary-free narcissism and callow youth, or evidence that Romero – never one to underplay a metaphor – has become a hectoring, tin-eared fogey?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    Stuart and Margolo are genuine marvels of computer generated special effects, each feather, whisker and strand of fur beautifully rendered. But they're bland and rather boring characters, dumbed down for kids.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Roberts fans will, of course, be delighted to see her in a role that plays to all her strengths -- fresh-faced looks, charming gangliness, air of infinite approachability -- and neatly sidesteps her glaring inability to act by having her more or less play herself.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Once upon a time there was a feisty young woman who didn't sit around twiddling her pretty thumbs and singing "Someday My Prince Will Come." That's the revisionist spin on Cinderella, and it twirls very nicely.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    We've come a long way from the filthiest people in the world: Who knew Waters could be so bland?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The sci-fi wonders, including an army of shuddering robo-soldiers and one-man, steam-powered bombers with delicate wood-and-linen wings, are truly marvelous and go a long way toward making up for the film's erratic pacing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Sleek, stylish and crammed with girl-power action.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Spooky and character-driven, this stylish ghost story owes a great deal to contemporary Japanese ghost movies in general and M. Night Shyamalan's "The Sixth Sense" (1999) in particular but weaves a creepy spell all its own.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Maitland McDonagh
    Ritchie appears to have been paying attention to what made "Reservoir Dogs" (a huge hit in the UK) work, rather than coming away convinced that the formula for success begins and ends with pop-culture allusions and scarcely digested "homages" to classic crime films.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Maitland McDonagh
    A brilliantly realized series of sucker punches, a philosophical howl disguised as a muscular guy movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Lightweight, thoroughly charming fluff.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's prestige is a doozy, both dazzling and preposterous, but if you're watching closely -- as Cutter advises in the film's first few minutes -- it's flawlessly set up.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    The story is compelling enough that even glib phrases like "healing through hip-hop" can't drag it down.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's all about the amazing look, cobbled together from an astonishingly evocative range of sources: "Nosferatu" and "Mad Love," "Brazil" and "Metropolis," a haunted mosaic of bits and pieces of movie memories.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Thank goodness for Pfeiffer's Lamia, a harridan who's lived long enough to get the face she deserves and will do anything to hide it. She's a wicked delight.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    Overall this is an assured piece of genre filmmaking that delivers the goods so stylishly it hardly matters that they aren't fresh.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's ensemble portrait of women caught between nostalgia for the tough and free-spirited babes they were (however much that freedom may have been illusory) and uncertainty about what their futures hold is almost painfully on target.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Solomonoff cuts back and forth between 1984 and 1976, gradually revealing the truth of what happened, but the mystery is less important than the complex relationship between Natalia and Elena, which was sorely tested by events beyond their control.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a shame to see such dedicated performers flay their psyches in the service of such fundamentally shallow material.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    A cut above the preposterous action spectacles that now pass for espionage films.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    Never boring, often excruciating and occasionally transcendent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    As is always the case with compilation films, some segments are far better than others. But they're all so brief that the least of them passes quickly and the best are small miracles of economical storytelling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Maitland McDonagh
    It's sometimes wrenching to watch, but it's too gripping to turn away from.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Richly imagined and resolutely unpredictable, this dark and profoundly optimistic paean to passion -- for glass, for horses, for the thrill of the moment after a coin is flipped but before it falls -- is held together by Gillian Armstrong's solid direction and by strong, if occasionally strident, performances from Fiennes and newcomer Blanchett.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Maitland McDonagh
    Mediocre documentary squanders a terrific subject.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    There's way too much CGI gadgetry, some inventive, much simply flashy in the worst kind of video-game way. The kids are nearly lost in the glitz.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Solidly entertaining and surprisingly free of the Mamet-isms that can suck the life right out of the most tightly crafted story.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    The scenes from Epidemic have the high-contrast look of a 1920s horror film, are in English (much of it badly dubbed) and feature images that are handsome and preposterous in equal parts -- they're amusing, and too stylized to be disturbing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Inlike many directors with music video backgrounds, Tim Story keeps the flashy cutting to a minimum and lets the story unfold at its own unhurried pace.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Urzua's unsentimental story of shattered idealism is specific to Cuba, but anyone whose path to adulthood was paved with disillusionment, -- whether they were betrayed by faith, family or institutions – will understand her melancholy nostalgia.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Seething with suggestions of perverse pleasures and inchoate horror, this dark fairy tale won't win the Pennsylvania-born, London-based Quay brothers any new fans -- it plays to the converted, and the converted know who they are.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    The end result is the very definition of a summer movie: breezy, undemanding and a carefully balanced blend of the familiar and the not-quite-what-you-expected.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Markowitz 's low key coming of age/coming out story isn't particularly original, but features subtle performances and a vivid sense of place.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Matheson's bitterly ironic ending -- which pivots on the nature of Neville's legend -- is gutted and turned into formulaic pap.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film delivers what it promises: A look at the "wild ride" that ensues when brash young men set out to conquer the online world with laptops, cell phones and sketchy business plans.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    While sometimes evocative, they don't add up to a satisfying movie any more than, as several characters are cautioned, coffee and cigarettes constitute a healthy lunch.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Werner Herzog's self-proclaimed "science-fiction fantasy" is a meticulously constructed fiction made from a combination of real-life footage repurposed in ways a conventional documentarian couldn't imagine.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's main attractions are the Charlottes, but the price of watching their eerie psychological pas de deux is to endure muddled metaphors and goofy gadgetry.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While Canadian writer-director Eric Nicholas has no fresh thoughts about the voyeuristic nature of movie going, he knows enough to make sure when high-tech peeper Doug (Colin Hanks, son of Tom) conceals his camera in a bag, its lens pokes out of the zipper like the big, fat metaphor it is.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Bana's performance is nothing short of electrifying.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    All the right intentions but never overcomes the essential problem of showing what's going on inside people's heads.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Overall, Owen and Law are more nuanced than Roberts and Portman, but Portman's dewy youth is 90 percent of Alice (the remaining 10 is an eleventh-hour twist), and Nichols uses the unkindly costumed Roberts so skillfully that her performance looks like a revelation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    The larger message remains clear: Unified communities have more power than they realize, and the most vicious enemy of progress is learned helplessness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Though the portentous title is taken from the Old Testament -- Elah is where little David took on Goliath -- the film's concerns are painfully timely and forcefully articulated.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a shimmering, thorny, and consummately self-aware valentine to a paradise, however illusory, lost.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Curl your cynical lip if you want, but there's a place for heartwarming, life-affirming, even weepy dramas, and Robert Redford brings the best-selling novel about a traumatized teen and her wounded horse to the screen with dignity and restraint.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    A tour de force and an utter delight, studded with priceless supporting bits by Miriam Margolyes, Maury Chaykin, Rosemary Harris and Rita Tushingham, each of whom steals at least one richly deserved moment in the spotlight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Barnes, now in his seventies and relocated by the Witness Protection Program, is shot only in silhouette, but there's plenty of footage of him in his heyday, dressed to the pimpalicious nines and playing to the cameras like a movie star.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    The writers get the mix just about right, and first-time Bond director Martin Campbell moves things along fairly briskly.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A combination of muddy sound mix and players with heavy accents (particularly Chinese superstar Gong, who seems to have learned her lines phonetically) renders large swaths of dialogue incomprehensible, but the details of what's being said and done don't really matter.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Maitland McDonagh
    Insipid, formulaic and suitable for the dumbed-down sensibilities of lowest-common-denominator couch potatoes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Much of the film's appeal rests with Thai soap-opera actress Panyopas, whose bittersweet charm smoothes over the uglier aspects of Tum's spiral into crime.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Maitland McDonagh
    British documentarian Peter Bate frames a mix of archival materials and re-creations with a "trial" at which Leopold listens to testimony against him from within a wood-and-glass booth, like Nazi Adolf Eichmann at Nuremberg.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    Ultimately, Coppola's pastel-colored take on Marie's life is beguiling and annoying in equal measure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    The overall effect is either exhilarating or exhausting, depending on your emotional investment in the franchise, but credit where credit is due: Steven Spielberg and George Lucas set out to make one for the fans and delivered.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Maitland McDonagh
    A workmanlike piece of storytelling elevated by fine performances.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This loving parody is steeped in comic book trivia and lore: The more you know, the more heartfelt your response to the film is likely to be.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Maitland McDonagh
    Rests on three excellent performances, of which the most difficult is Stephen Rea's.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Even the film's ironic ending is deftly handled, its cynicism is tempered by a certain rueful wisdom.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Maitland McDonagh
    There are poignant moments in this apocalyptic "what if" exercise.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Anime enthusiasts will want to take a look, but the film is too uneven to serve as a good introduction to the form.

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