For 249 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 The Central Park Five
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 249
249 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Most of the dialogue is invented, but the sweep of events is genuine.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Jenkins
    Like most of Rohmer’s movies, A Summer’s Tale is comic, humane and much more complicated than it seems at first. The fresh-faced actors, realistic dialogue and naturalistic performances suggest a casual approach, but as the story progresses, the filmmaker’s control is increasingly evident.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Quite aside from Shinto transformation parables or Buddhist reincarnation teachings, the final scene shows how family wisdom is conserved and recycled. It's a moment that might elicit a smile or a tear, or perhaps both.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    There's nothing unexpected in this well-made picture, aside from the name of the director: Takeshi Miike.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Although the monks don't seek death, Of Gods And Men can be seen as an ode to religiously motivated self-sacrifice. But Beauvois deliberately leaves the story open-ended. The value of these men's lives, he's noting, is not defined by how they ended.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Evil cannot triumph in a movie made in China, but Drug War's ultimate scene nonetheless manages to astonish, revealing both Choi's character and the nature of mainland justice. Rather than dodging the harshness of Chinese authority, To depicts it implacably. He does exactly what the censors want, and yet subverts their worldview.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Sensitive performances by the four main players suit the tone, which is naturalistic and even earthy — most of the characters are shown going to the bathroom — yet ultimately poignant.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie ends powerfully, with a sudden pileup of fright, death and a disconcerting glimpse of beauty. If Lebanon's goal is to keep the viewer on edge and off balance, its final minutes are exemplary.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie falls somewhere between the austere and the playful.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The director recut the movie several times as events overtook it. She may yet do so again — although if more major changes occur, they could merit beginning another documentary. As The Square makes clear, Noujaim would not hesitate to rush back into the fray.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Those who don't savor Cohen's leisurely rhythms will probably not respond to Museum Hours, and even the movie's admirers will admit that it could be a little tighter. One scene that might be trimmed is the one where museum-goers pose, naked as the people on the canvases around them. The interlude certainly isn't dull, but it is a little brazen for a film that encourages its viewers to find the beauty in more commonplace sights.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    As Arbor, nonprofessional actor Chapman gives one of the fiercest performances of this kind since Martin Compston's turn as a different sort of teenage entrepreneur in Loach's 2002 film "Sweet Sixteen." He's riveting, even in his final moment of calm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is not a story but a text, and Cedar is its playfully intrusive interpreter.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Ruiz, whose best-known films include his 1999 adaptation of Proust's "Time Regained," coolly roams the ambiguous territories between tragedy and soap opera, and between the traditional and the modern.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Wadjda offers an interesting contrast to films made in Iran. Where the latter country has a long cinematic tradition, Mansour's is the first feature shot entirely in Saudi Arabia.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Police, Adjective has considerable power, and the issues it raises linger in the mind.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Sister offers several reasons why the boy can't or won't return to ski-resort robbery next winter. But the movie also quietly suggests that, whatever he does, Simon will always be the boy from down below, boldly impersonating someone born to the heights.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Ai is a great movie subject for many reasons, but one is that he understands the power of appearing larger than life on the silver screen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie’s universal themes don’t impress, its specific details do.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The Turin Horse is an absolute vision, masterly and enveloping in a way that less personal, more conventional movies are not. The film doesn't seduce; it commands.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Watching Lorna's attempt to balance self-interest and empathy can be heartbreaking. If Lorna's Silence as a whole doesn't rank among the Dardennes's best, it does follow the money to moments and characters that are unforgettable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Although it's the fourth documentary about the West Memphis Three, West of Memphis doesn't feel superfluous. This bizarre case rates at least 18 documentaries - one for each year Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley spent in prison for murders they clearly didn't commit.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Ultimately, the bleak universe conjured by Beyond the Hills is more compelling than what happens in it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Its greatest advantage over the book is that this is a story well-documented in moving pictures. In addition to recent interviews with the five, the filmmakers deftly marshal news footage, clips from the supposed confessions, and trenchant analysis.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The deliberate pace may suggest that the film is being thoughtful, but Let Me In is really just an exploitation movie with the confidence to take it slow.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Despite the contrived climax, I Am Love has emotional power. The contrast between duty and passion is well-drawn, and Swinton's transition from winter matriarch to springtime lover is compelling, even if the circumstances are implausible.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie's mix of nihilistic violence and snarky attitude suggests "In Bruges," it's a family resemblance. The writer-director of that film, which also starred Gleeson, is Martin McDonagh, the younger brother of this one's. Despite the similarities, the older McDonagh has a lighter touch. Where "In Bruges" ultimately became a mechanical bloodbath, The Guard scampers quickly through the action scenes, delivering commentary on genre conventions as it goes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's first word is oishi, Japanese for "delicious," and what follows is a treat for sushi veterans. First-timers, however, may wish for a little more context.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    The documentary is powerful, as far as it goes, but would be stronger if the filmmakers had been able to follow the story further.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    A Touch of Sin is the most dramatic and even lurid of writer-director Jia Zhangke's movies. The film-festival star hasn't quite become a Chinese Tarantino, however.

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