For 919 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Roush's Scores

Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Downton Abbey: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Emily Owens, M.D.: Season 1
Score distribution:
919 tv reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    As you'd expect from co-creator Ryan Murphy (Glee), the tone can wobble from sappy to flamboyantly snarky, but there's a real emotional undercurrent that makes Normal a good fit with Matthew Perry's new sitcom Go On.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Some of the episode is forced--Sarah's babbling job tryout with Hank, for instance--but in those universal moments of family togetherness and transition, as these grown-ups who sometimes still feel like kids marvel at the mystery of parenthood, Parenthood is worth its weight in sentimental angst.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Familiarity points deducted, Arrow is still a very slick piece of work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The twists are solid, if never as electrifying as on Showtime's Homeland, while George clearly learned her lessons well at the feet of Sydney Bristow.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    At just 90 minutes, The Girl can feel rushed and only occasionally convinces us that an actual movie is being made--this is so focused on Hitch-and-Tippi you'd think The Birds was a one-woman show.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    This agreeable, though hardly groundbreaking, hour-long buddy comedy-with-music is almost as catchy as the cover tunes these wedding (and occasional Bar Mitzvah) singer/musicians specialize in.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Once again the veterans wipe the floor with the young whippersnappers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Cougar Town is as unrepentantly shallow and silly as ever.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The cast is solid and admirably diverse.... While never as engaging as Grey's Anatomy nor clever enough to make us forget the void left by House's departure, Mornings at least does no harm.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Much of the casting is disappointingly flat, and the character development as shallow as in any video game.... Still, ambition counts for a lot in this expansive genre, and Defiance gets better with each episode.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    It's a step above the typical CW soap, and worth penciling in an appointment in your own TV diary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Their [Jim and Billy's] relationship deepens as the series continues, and while I'm not sure there's an actual series in this set-up, for now Legit achieves a legitimately engaging balance between the shockingly grotesque and the genuinely heartfelt.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Curiously compelling.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    His easy camaraderie with these women [in prison] forms the core of the film, HBO's eighth collaboration with filmmaker Alexandra Pelosi, and their mutual affection and hope for a better future is genuinely inspiring.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    It's too early yet to know if the writing can avoid the pitfalls of the "Who Killed Rosie Larsen?" story, but this is off to a promising start.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Recovery won't be easy, but so far it's an enjoyably bumpy ride.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The sardonically squirm-inducing Maron alternates between slice-of-rant sitcom and self-obsessed podcast from the comedian's garage.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The intriguing three-part The Bletchley Circle, which admirably avoids preciousness as it depicts the teamwork of four women who during WWII worked secretly for the government as code breakers (Bletchley Park was their HQ).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Dexter's scenes with Vogel and Deb are so electrifying and morbidly juicy that the subplots involving Dexter's co-workers in Miami Metro Homicide seem more than ever like dreary padding.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Like many HBO half-hours, this is a slow, slow burn to get to a payoff. The smiles here are of recognition that even the most ordinary families can have wonderfully strange roots.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The dumb-laugh ratio is surprisingly high. Much of the credit goes to pros like Beau Bridges and Margo Martindale.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Earnest but rarely saccharine.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Adapted from three overlapping page-turners by the prolific Philippa Gregory, this enjoyably propulsive high melodrama replays the classic Wars of the Roses family feud (York vs. Lancaster) from the perspective of the women who are both pawns and players in a violent, turbulent game of claiming and keeping the English throne.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Homeland has its own rebuilding to do, and while some may miss the faster pace of last season, these are dark times, and the show is better for dealing with that reality in uncompromising terms.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The Marshal is retro action stuff, every week a different chase and capture, but the ungroomed MacBride has enough character - and so does the show - to distinguish it from TV's legion of mediocrities from Matlock to The Commish. [31 Jan 1995]
    • USA Today
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Three seasons in, Cinemax's Strike Back is the ultimate shoot-first think-later exercise in outrageous mayhem and explosively over-the-top buddy heroics.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Despite a cliché video-journal gimmick that has everyone talking to the camera Modern Family style, which ends up belaboring each point, and schmaltzy life lessons ("Sometimes you underestimate the ones you love") wrapping each of the three episodes I've screened, the Fox Show has an appealingly unforced rhythm to its humor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    If the S.H.I.E.L.D. pilot is a bit of a slow-burner, not so much a "wow" as a "hmmmm" as it assembles its team of head-turning secret agents--they're the heroes behind the superheroes, operating in the shadows as the more famous good guys reap the headlines--the potential is sky's-the-limit huge for this clever action romp.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The visuals help distract from the hokey sampler-ready dialogue: "When you really love someone, you don't need proof. You can feel it."... but I'd be happy to follow this White Rabbit just about anywhere. On a less busy night.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    While this Little League comedy doesn't quite measure up to the big leagues, we shouldn't be surprised if family audiences rally around the team, turning a solid base hit into something potentially worthy of extra innings.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    What Mob City may lack in originality it compensates for in atmosphere and sharp characterizations.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Resurrection subverts expectations by sidestepping the creepy and macabre--although there are layers of mysteries and secrets in the small town of Arcadia, Missouri--and dwelling in a more bucolic and even tear-jerking manner on the spiritual and societal ramifications of this apparent miracle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The pilot is enjoyable, but it's hard to know where it's heading.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Because for all of the show's high-octane action trappings, the human connection between these buddy cops is what ultimately will make Almost Human compute.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    While the show is uniformly silly and slight, it becomes rather endearing the more we get to know this band of knucklehead brothers within a Bad News Platoon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Paradise is based on a Zola novel but is redolent of Dickens, envisioning the store as an insular world full of colorful characters, with its sentimental and romantic upstairs-downstairs intrigues opulently packaged.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Downton is on much firmer and more satisfying ground when charting the new romantic possibilities for Lady Mary (Michelle Dockery) or spinning sentimental morality tales among the colorful servants below stairs.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    A high-concept guilty pleasure that comes as a bit of a creative relief after a dreary season of derivative spin-offs, reboots and retreads.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    There's some lovely Jazz Age music (by Adrian Johnston), charismatic performances and a story worth telling in Starz's evocative but languorous five-part miniseries.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    It's the best original comedy TBS has yet produced--which may not be saying much, but given the mostly lousy track record among broadcast sitcoms this fall, it's hardly bargain basement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Silverman performs her proudly raunchy set before an intimate 39-seat audience, which is only fitting for someone who is so defiantly in-your-face.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    It may not be not the most original premise, and the supporting cast leaves much to be desired (with the exception of droll Catherine Lemieux as a feisty veterinary pathologist), but Helix creates an intense atmosphere of dread and fear in which a fade to snowy white can be as scary as the deepest black.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Vikings has a primitive grandeur, with generous helpings of sex and savagery. Missing Spartacus this winter? Give these warriors a look.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    If the brisk 90-minute film can feel incomplete at times--almost no mention is made of the colorful circus of opponents Romney defeated to gain the 2012 nomination, and running mate Paul Ryan isn't shown until the actual election day--Mitt is less concerned with being a chronicle of recent political events than it is with providing an unguarded profile of a man who rarely let his hair down in public.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    A breezy new keepsake documentary that relives the Academy Awards' 85-year history.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    I suppose you could save time by just going back and watching the original movie (which starred George Clooney and Quentin Tarantino, who wrote the script), but if you liked that one, you'll almost certainly dig this.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Jack's "surrounded by idiots" misanthropy and drill-sergeant parenting threatens to wear thin, but Meloni sells it with an underlying intelligence and empathetic warmth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Expectations couldn't be lower for this unrequested reunion, which is why it comes as such a nice surprise that Playing House, while hardly anything new, provides a much happier showcase for these gals' effortlessly snarky chemistry.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The novelty--and thus, a bit of the edge--is gone as Fox's 12-part 24: Live Another Day seeks to prove that less is more, slowly revving up the comfortably formulaic engine while visceral split-screen editing once again intensifies the literally explosive twists. And yet, because a sad, mad, badass Jack Bauer is the only Jack we've ever known, there's something grimly satisfying when he mutters bleakly to one of his few allies, "I don't have any friends."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    First impression is that Halt is fresh and fraught with calculated promise, but whether that's enough to catch fire remains to be seen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Better than the movie...How often can you say that about a network knockoff? [30 Sept 1996, p.3D]
    • USA Today
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The best parts of this sleek but scaled-down show are what made the first film such an unexpected gas back in 1987: cartoonish mayhem, puns and visual gags, a cheeky tweaking of TV "infotainment" and a cheerful cynicism about a corporate culture grown even more mendacious on the back of the computer chip. [14 Mar 1994]
    • USA Today
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    It's a little cheesy, but never takes itself very seriously.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    While Wednesday's pilot episode of Extant (all that was available for review) lacks the sort of unforgettable "wow" moment provided by the severed cow in Dome's opener, the new series also seems less likely to lapse irrevocably into silly hysteria.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Provocative and sexily surprising, reminiscent at times of HBO's Hung, only more entertaining than depressing, the Trumans' story plays out with a funny-sad poignancy that rings true even when some of the details feel off.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Gordon bristles with self-righteousness as he grimly takes the measure of Gotham's considerable underbelly. And that's where the lurid fun, such as it is, of Gotham can be found. And savored, as in Jada Pinkett Smith's sinewy nightclub gangster Fish Mooney.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The mysteries he and Martinez tackle are rather pro forma, but that's not what tends to keep shows like Castle and Bones on the air season after season. It's more about enjoying being in the company of these charismatic characters, and there's strong chemistry between the debonair Gruffudd and the earthy De La Garza.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    There are still pleasures to be found in Boardwalk Empire, but it's definitely time to wrap--and enjoy a good stiff drink as a reward.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    [An] amusing docu-reality series.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    A grueling but intriguing new double-fisted drama set in the world of mixed martial arts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    In a summer with so many heavy and dour alternatives (hello, Leftovers), this escapist fluff will be for some just what the doctor ... you know.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The less revealed about the story the better. Let's just say that if you make it to the end of Monday's introductory chapter, you'll very likely feel compelled to see where else this unusual space/soap opera is heading.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    Lifetime gives the [western] genre a try with the enjoyably chaotic Civil War-era potboiler Deliverance Creek.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    The Newsroom returns for a truncated six-episode final season, it appears that less may be more--as in, more absorbing and more entertaining, with less irritation from slapstick rom-com subplots that tend to make smart people (especially the women) look insultingly stupid.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Roush
    TNT complies with a delightful series version of its Librarian TV-movie franchise, mixing elements of Indiana Jones, The DaVinci Code and even Warehouse 13 in jaunty and fantastical capers extolling the power and allure, and sometimes danger, of magic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Roush
    Fringe returns in fine form for its second season.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    If Fontana's goal is stark realism, it's undercut by the overly theatrical device of a funky narrator, an inmate who uses a wheelchair (Harold Perrineau) and who barks his thoughts into the camera. A sample commentary: "People kill to stay alive. That's as true in prison as out. But I'm wondering why in here we fight so hard to stay alive." [11 July 1997, p.3D]
    • USA Today
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    This one's a notch better than some, with Ben Savage (Fred's younger brother) only slightly overdoing it as Cory Matthews, the brat of his pack, boasting with his buds about how late they made it through last night's late-TV monologue. [24 Sept 1993, p.3D]
    • USA Today
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    At best, and most, 3rd Rock might catch on as the silliest of guilty pleasures, a Benny Hill burlesque where the leering material is enlivened by some outstanding physical comedy. ... When goofy, 3rd Rock rolls. When dirty, it's stone-cold bad. [9 Jan 1996]
    • USA Today
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    A one-joke domestic sitcom redeemed by the joke's effectiveness. [17 Sep 1991]
    • USA Today
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    Defiantly deadpan and amusing. [26 May 1995]
    • USA Today
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    At least this feels like a culture-clash adventure, not merely an audition for the seven callow cuties sharing yet another fab flat. [27 Jun 1995]
    • USA Today
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    An intriguing, brainy but strangely unappealing catalog of short film pieces, the sort of nervy, smug spoofs that NBC's Saturday Night Live specializes in. [25 Sep 1992]
    • USA Today
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    This earnest Texas saga of high-school football and larger life goals really does go against the grain. It's not an annoying sitcom, for one. And it has a generally terrific cast and positive values. But in terms of ambition and depth, it fumbles on a gridiron of self-righteous improbability. [1 Oct 1993]
    • USA Today
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Roush
    Too much of Band is either overly familiar or overly unfamiliar, such as the young boy in a coma (Griffin Gluck) who serves as an omniscient narrator and who, through some metaphysical stretch, can speak to other patients whenever they lose consciousness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Roush
    Like most other Cheers fans, it's impossible not to miss the gang back East. But given the disappointing season at hand, Frasier will do. [16 Sept 1993, p.1D]
    • USA Today

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