Matt Zoller Seitz

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For 327 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Zoller Seitz's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Oz: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 327
327 tv reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Paradise Lost 3 never loses sight of the sickening black humor of it all--how Echols, Baldwin, and Misskelley became, in effect, mere extras in a shadowplay about the omnipotence of the state. In the shadow of such sickness, all the personal dramas can't help but pale, but there are still surprising and powerful moments.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    [The first three episodes] contain no evidence that it'll rival or exceed season four, an intricately wrought and unexpectedly spare and bluesy batch of hours whose quality exceeded anything that Terence Winter's gangster saga had given us in seasons one through three.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Not great, but good, and promising.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The show is more successful when the Donovans are interacting with rich or otherwise spoiled people than when they’re dealing with their own problems, because the problems, however sympathetically written and acted, are a potluck stew of elements you’ve seen in other stories about South Boston Irish-Americans.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Noah didn’t fade into the wallpaper, though. Although the broadcast preserved much of The Daily Show set, the opening theme, most of the recurring bits, and even closed with a Moment of Zen, there were many moments where the skinny South African (who is 31 but could pass for 21) gave us hints of how his Show might differ from Stewart’s--starting with energy, which is cool and aloof in a Johnny Carson vein, bordering on unflappable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Has a fine, film noirish vibe and an irresistible mystery hook. [25 Sep 2002]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's fair to say that there isn't a single element in The Flash that you haven't seen before. It should all be a big yawn. And yet it's not. The earnestness puts it over.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    I wouldn't say season two of The Newsroom is a big improvement over season one, but the show's definitely more measured and confident--and now that we've accepted that certain tics, such as setting the stories in a recent, real past, aren't going away, it's easier to appreciate what Sorkin and company do well.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The show is derivative but passionate, verging on corny. It means what it’s telling us and showing us, and there’s a sense of curiosity and commitment in every frame.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The supporting cast is excellent, even though their characters feel a bit one-note right now.... As long as Andre Braugher is employed, it's a force for good in the universe.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    There are times when it takes itself too seriously as modern mythmaking, as if we haven't already seen tales like this before. But even when the momentum flags or the rhythm seems slightly off, the show's sheer gorgeousness is compelling, and it's clear that Darabont has a vision for this thing, even though we can't deduce every detail based on two episodes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    I doubt any gay person will see him- or herself represented on Queer as Folk with absolute realism and accuracy. It's basically a trashy soap opera with a veneer of social criticism a gay, sexually explicit "Melrose Place." But it's fun all the same addictive, suspenseful and sometimes moving, a populist glimpse of a subculture that pop culture rarely examines. [1 Dec 2000, p.F1]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is still a cheeky, trashy, nasty series, one that'll do or show pretty much anything if it thinks it'll get a rise out of you. But its sense of itself has become more refined.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    "Reno 911!" isn't quite as rich and subtle as the best improvised comedy - the basic format becomes repetitive, and the performers sometimes drive the material into absurd directions when it might have been funnier to keep things smaller - but all in all, it's still a very funny show. [23 Jul 2003]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    You don't immediately sense how all of the characters are connected or how they might eventually become connected--most of the pilot is scene-setting and mood-building--but what's onscreen is compelling.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This A&E miniseries is exuberantly batty.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    the film is as smart and sexy as it is extravagantly silly; its silliness is knowing and affectionate.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    These subplots aren't inherently dull, but they're not as compelling as the sight of a singer belting a new ballad while its authors and their patrons look on.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Pacino and Mirren’s teamwork keeps Phil Spector watchable even when it’s dousing itself in dramatic ethanol and lighting a match.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Vegas isn't art and doesn't knock itself out pretending otherwise. But its no-fuss directness is appealing, and Quaid's ropy scowl keeps it centered.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Gracepoint is a good show--not great, but good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The more frequently Birthday Boys returns to seemingly unfunny or barely funny bits, the funnier they eventually become--another Python borrowing, and a good one.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Colbert didn’t reinvent the wheel, but he took it for quite a spin, and his charisma enlivened even the bits that didn’t quite work, like his “gotcha” question to Bush about the ways in which he differs politically from his brother George.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    If the season-three premiere is any indication, although AHS has lost its novelty, it still has that seventies and eighties grindhouse/drive-in/midnight movie feeling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It might take some time to adapt to what the gang is trying to do here, but it’s definitely in sync with the Muppet mission of entertaining everyone at their own level, and for every misjudged moment there are several more that are sublime.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    A to Z glides, mainly because its stars, Mad Men's Ben Feldman and How I Met Your Mother's Cristin Milioti, are a flat-out great couple, with an understated screwball energy that Howard Hawks would've known what to do with.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Hipsters will roll their eyes at the show's many cliches - decent small-town folk, cynical city slickers, the healing power of the great outdoors, etc. - but everyone else will be grateful. And fortunately, some of the performances are just odd and striking enough to reduce the sugar quotient. [16 Sept 2002, p.23]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    There's still a sense that The Walking Dead is shambling along too lackadaisically. Great pulp is propulsive, ruthless. But the show's embrace of "B"-movie values is a heartening sign.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It’s hard to imagine Hannibal scaling new peaks of originality as drama--not with characters and situations that have, in more than one sense, been done to death. At least there’s life in the acting and in the show’s inventive visuals.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Too much of the show may remind you of the experience of being trapped in a bar with shrill drunks who aren’t anywhere near as fascinating as they seem to think. Still, the series lingers in the mind. With its hurts and silences, its yellow-brown lighting and oak-and-sawdust textures, and its sense of impending doom, it is unlike anything else that calls itself American television.

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