For 781 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matthew Gilbert's Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Rules of Engagement: Season 1
Score distribution:
781 tv reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The show isn't easy to warm up to, to be honest; it's draped in--and at times stifled by--meticulous period detail and too-perfect lighting, especially in Scorsese's premiere. But in episode two, the characters and the script begin to prevail, and the drama becomes more emotionally distinct and fascinating.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    There may be a smaller number of top-notch newbies this season, but Raising Hope, a celebration of parenthood and childhood, of small joys and big struggles, is certainly one of them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    [The] sentimental streak in the show is compensated by Frank's coldness and the scrappy urban realism, translated so effectively from the British original.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Based on the first three episodes, I'm thinking season 2 is going to be even better and certainly more consistent.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The Killing quickly hooks you with its steadily unfolding story line. Created by Veena Sud, based on a Danish TV hit named "Forbrydelsen," the show draws you into the tragedy of the crime, and then makes you crave its solution.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    With none of the conventional plot techniques TV viewers are accustomed to, it is a collection of rich moments and poignant characters that loosely adds up to something quite powerful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    With season two, the drama has fully come to life, with moments of savagery, hypocrisy, and bittersweet loyalty that make it a must-see show.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The Hour is not "Breaking Bad" good, or "Mad Men" good, but it's close.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The unfolding of the Parade’s End narrative has been directed (by Susanna White) and written to challenge--sometimes too much so. While you always understand the connections among the characters on “Downton,” you have to piece them together yourself in Parade’s End.... It’s the kind of demanding storytelling that differentiates “The Wire” from most other crime series.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The first few episodes of this import promise no slack--and plenty of poignancy--as the story line moves closer to the truth of the matter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s not as meticulous, cinematic, or original as those two shows ["Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad"], but it’s got the same kind of storytelling ambition. It’s the most vital new series of the year so far.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Orange Is the New Black is a funny, dramatically sound, poignant, and thoroughly addictive adventure through a bleak looking glass.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Unlike the majority of today's youth-market vehicles, Undeclared has been put together with a refreshing lack of cynicism (as well as a refreshing lack of laugh track). [25 Sept 2001, p.E1]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The story of the plague has been told before, and it will and should continue to find new life. But The Normal Heart tells it with admirable honesty and plenty of emotion.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Created by Mike Judge, it does for techies, venture capitalists, and tech-biz campuses what Judge’s film “Office Space” did for cubicle dwellers, their bosses, and office parks back in 1999.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a promising reentry. All the major themes, so subtly articulated across the first six seasons, are coming to a head.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The Knick is an astonishing new medical drama that has the potential to be one of the year’s best and most talked-about shows, as well as a breakthrough into TV series excellence for its star, Clive Owen, and its director and executive producer, Steven Soderbergh.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    As a weekly series, the effects need to remain impressive and the writers need to avoid falling into "Lost" and "Walking Dead" band-of-survivors rehash.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    This is a classic guilty pleasure, with campy twists and a fabulously diva-esque performance by Stowe.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    After the forced opening minutes, it's the best multi-cam-com of the season.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    The tone tips awkwardly between crude and romantic, and a little of Azaria goes a long way. But I'm game for episode 2.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Angel the WB's new child of "Buffy," is no ordinary spinoff, and it has the potential to become a witty hour of unearthly allegory in its own right. If it can maintain a sense of humor about itself, Angel, which stars David Boreanaz as Buffy's brooding former beau, may become one of those rare spinoffs that isn't merely a flat-out cash-in. [5 Oct 1999, p.D1]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If you're looking for sexual tension amid the laugh track, or social and political point-making between the punchlines, then "Will & Grace" may not work for you. It's a sitcom that has the potential to prove to prime time that attractions between adults are not always rooted in lust. [21 Sep 1998]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The bottom line is that "Ally McBeal" features wonderfully provocative scripts that are as clever as they are wise; supporting actors who are the definitive opposite of stock; and a carefully struck tone that balances the fantastic, the romantic, the sardonic, and the sincere. It is a uniquely imagined TV series that, with producer/writer David E. Kelley as the engine behind it, goes further than ever seemed possible. [14 Sep 1998]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    But the real question is: Will Dharma & Greg be able to expand its central, single joke into an entire series? An entertaining premiere, yes, but there may be a finite number of laughs to be had over those wacky hippies and the cold-hearted WASPs. [24 Sept 1997, p.C6]
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    A surprisingly promising hour that could become something special if it doesn't cop out and decide to become a hipped-up "Beverly Hills 90210." [29 Sept 1999, p.F10]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    This kind of material would wear thin after a while if the characters weren't as distinct and endearing as they are. [30 Apr 2005]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    A surprisingly stylish adaptation of a story that would seem to be played out after so many incarnations on the small and big screens. If Smallville can keep its supernatural plots engaging, and avoid focusing solely on Clark Kent's familiar teen alienation, it could evolve into a top-tier WB series. [16 Oct 2001, p.D16]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Compared to the grittier British version, the American Queer as Folk has a sweet, romanticized aura. At times, it even recalls the TV adaptation of "Tales of the City." The script has plenty of conflict, and the sexuality is hard-core, but the show also exudes an ensemble coziness and jokiness that finds the gang gathering regularly for late-night snacks at Debbie's diner. [1 Dec 2000, p.F1]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    As with most HBO series, "Curb Your Enthusiasm" isn't for everyone. Prerequisites include not only a desire for more of the best of "Seinfeld" but a willingness to go along with David's Brooklyn-bred grumpiness. [13 Oct 2000]